Does the Onion have secret sources inside the U.S. Department of Education? its stories are typically a week ahead of the real news. Some things are impossible to satirize.


“WASHINGTON—Citing the need to measure student achievement as its top priority, the U.S. Department of Education launched a new initiative Thursday to replace the nation’s entire K-12 curriculum with a single standardized test.


“According to government officials, the four-hour-long Universal Education Assessment will be used in every public school across the country, will contain identical questions for every student based on material appropriate for kindergarten through 12th grade, and will permanently take the place of more traditional methods such as classroom instruction and homework assignments.”
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/17jdkHy

This is the regular report from Bob Schaeffer of FairTest, which has been promoting test reform for many years.


 


 


Happy Holidays to assessment reformers around the nation from everyone at FairTest, and best wishes for a New Year filled with victories rolling back test misuse and overuse.


 


You can help strengthen the movement for 2015 by making an online contribution at: http:/www.fairtest.org/donate or mailing a check to P.O. Box 300204, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130.


 


Thanks for all you do!


 


Delaware Selective School Entrance Exams Under Fire

http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/local/item/76322-delaware-school-entrance-assessments-face-tough-test


 


Florida State Government Will Investigate School Testing Concerns

http://www.tampabay.com/news/education/k12/state-says-it-will-investigate-standardized-tests-in-schools/2211152


 


Atlanta, Georgia Test Cheating Trial May Last Until Spring

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/District_Dossier/2014/12/atlanta_trial_week_11.html


 


Maryland Teachers Call for Suspension of Kindergarten Readiness Test

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2014/12/maryland_teachers_union_calls_.html


 


New Jersey Teens’ Testimony Leads Board to Evaluate Testing Requirement

http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2014/12/voorhees_student_opposition_to.html

Parents Cheer 10-Year-Old Student’s Dissection of New Jersey Common Core Test

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/12/16/i-dont-want-to-deal-with-this-nonsense-what-a-10-year-old-girl-had-to-say-about-common-core-left-parents-cheering/

12 Reasons Why New Jersey Activists Oppose PARCC Testing

https://www.facebook.com/SaveOurSchoolsNJ/posts/882113598488468


 


New Mexico Legislation Would Limit Testing Days

http://www.kob.com/article/stories/s3656903.shtml


 


New York Advocates Blast Gov. Cuomo’s Teacher Testing Scheme

http://poststar.com/blogs/a_time_to_learn/cuomo-poses-teacher-changes-advocates-say-priorities-misplaced/article_1c4d39be-870e-11e4-aa87-8332f9b35724.html


 


Over-Testing Tea Party for North Dakota Students

http://www.grandforksherald.com/opinion-letters/3637256-letter-tea-party-students-tested-enough-already


 


Purpose of Texas Schools Should Not Be Generating More Testing Data

http://www.cagle.com/2014/12/point-of-schools-isnt-more-testing/


 


Utah Grades the Wrong Things in Education

http://www.standard.net/Guest-Commentary/2014/12/20/Grading-the-wrong-things-in-public-education.html

Teacher Defense Association Seeks Reinstatement of Educator Fired for Refusing to Administer Tests

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Utah-Teacher-Defense-Association/733485876728516


 


Common Core Tests Steal Joy Out of Reading

http://www.alternet.org/how-newest-high-stakes-tests-are-stealing-joy-reading-our-kids?akid=12579.32230.NKFXSG&rd=1&src=newsletter1028778&t=11


 


More States Drop Out of PARCC Testing Consortium

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mercedes-schneider/parcc-attrition-from-2011_b_6364458.html


 


Arne Duncan’s World of Denial

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-greene/arne-duncans-denial_b_6336960.html


 


Duncan and Other “Reformers” Should Apologize

http://scholasticadministrator.typepad.com/thisweekineducation/2014/12/thompson-the-power-of-the-words-im-sorry.html


 


Teachers Cal for 360-Degree Accountability

http://www.livingindialogue.com/teacher-team-offers-new-vision-responsibility/


 


One Public School Teacher’s Open Letter to America

http://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/an-open-letter-to-america-from-a-public-school-teacher–2


 


Pushing Back Against High-Stakes for Students with Disabilities

http://www.aft.org/ae/winter2014-2015/tanis


 


Bad Assed Teachers Push Sec. Duncan on Test Misuse for Students with Disabilities

http://badassteachers.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-badass-teachers-association-open.html


 


Pearson and the Assessment Problem

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/vicki-cobb/pearson-and-the-assessmen_b_6343602.html


 


 


 


Bob Schaeffer, Public Education Director

FairTest: National Center for Fair & Open Testing

office- (239) 395-6773 fax- (239) 395-6779

mobile- (239) 699-0468

web- http://www.fairtest.org
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://dianeravitch.net/2014/12/27/fairtest-reports-on-advance-of-test-reform-movement/

If the issues were not so serious, watching test-and-punish advocates backpedal in the face of the rapidly growing testing resistance movement would be great entertainment. From U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan crying crocodile tears about the impacts of the very policies he advocated, to Rhode Island Commissioner Deborah Grist’s sudden embrace of an even longer suspension of the graduation testing requirements she long defended, to Florida Governor Rick Scott promising a commission to review the testing overkill his political allies imposed (a stalling tactic also adopted by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie), politicians are beginning to wake up to the power of grassroots activism. At the same time, courageous local leaders — such as a Colorado Superintendent, several Florida school committees and the Vermont State Board of Education — are pushing the envelope by calling for a moratorium on standardized testing to allow for development of better assessments.


No question that 2014-2015 is going to be a most exciting school year for assessment reformers as PBS education reporter John Merrow makes clear in his predictions!


Colorado District Superintendent Wants to End Standardized Testing


http://ift.tt/1qCWuWD


Feds Tell Florida: Test English Language Learners in English ASAP


http://ift.tt/1qqN0h1


Palm Beach School Board Considers Opting Out From Florida State Testing


http://ift.tt/1teNUn1


Hundreds Endorse Lee County Opt-Out Petition (now almost 1000 signers)


http://ift.tt/1teNWeG


Florida Lags on ACT . . . Again


http://ift.tt/1teNUn5


Governor Calls for Review of Florida Standardized Testing Policies


http://ift.tt/1teNUn6


Undermining Kindergarten in Illinois, One Test at a Time


http://ift.tt/1qkoWiD


Chicago Teachers Report on How to Organize a Test Boycott


http://ift.tt/1teNUn9


Illinois Super Tells Parents What Matters Most in Education


http://ift.tt/1qkoWyV


New Massachusetts Teachers Union Head: How Tests Are Failing Our Schools


http://ift.tt/1teNWeL


Concerns Grow as New Mexico Shifts to Computerized Testing


http://ift.tt/1teNUnc


New Mexico Teachers Say State Evaluation System Does Not Effectively Measure Performance


http://ift.tt/1qkoYqJ


Why New York State Common Core Test Scores Should Be Ignored


http://ift.tt/1levXTh


Final Opt-Out Numbers Show Movement Jumped in New York City


http://ift.tt/1qkoYqN


Wanted: The Whole Truth About New York State Exams


http://ift.tt/1soLb6z


Rhode Island Commissioner Back Tracks: Now Supports Longer Delay in Grad Test Requirement


http://ift.tt/1teNWeP


Texas Suspends Math Grade Promotion Test Requirement


http://ift.tt/1nk41bL


Vermont Calls on Feds to Overhaul NCLB Testing Policy


http://ift.tt/1teNUDw


See Vermont State Board of Education Resolution


http://ift.tt/1vCiEMT


Vermont Secretary of Education Speaks Out Against Standardized Testing


http://ift.tt/1teNWv6


Federal Stubbornness Falsely Labels Washington Schools as “Failing”


http://ift.tt/1qkoWz6


Parents Want an End to the Testing Obsession


http://ift.tt/1teNUDD


Kindergarten “Sweat Shop” Testing Frenzy Comes Under Fire


http://ift.tt/1pVRIHk


Predictions for the New School Year: Growing Resistance to High-Stakes Testing Tops the List


http://ift.tt/1teNUDI


Duncan Offers States One-Year Postponement on Test-Based Teacher Evaluation


http://ift.tt/1sXJZLe


See FairTest News Release


http://ift.tt/1teNUDL


Administrators Pledge Ethical Treatment of Children Whose Families Choose to Opt Out


http://ift.tt/1qkoYHa


Report Urges Fewer Tests, More Peer Review


http://ift.tt/1teNUDM


Education News: Groundhog Day All Over Again?


http://ift.tt/1qkoWzc


Standardized Testing Is Really Great: Two Poems


http://ift.tt/1qkoWPs


Public TV Airs Two Videos Showing Excellent Schools Using Healthy Assessment (check websites for dates, times and channels)


http://ift.tt/1teNUU3


http://ift.tt/1teNUU4


Bob Schaeffer, Public Education Director

FairTest: National Center for Fair & Open Testing


office- (239) 395-6773 fax- (239) 395-6779

mobile- (239) 696-0468

web- http://www.fairtest.org
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1qkoYaa

If data and research matter, the worst reform in U.S. education is the virtual charter school.


The League of Women Voters–one of the few national organizations with integrity about education issues (I.e. has not been bought by the Gates Foundation) issued a report about these floundering “schools,” that typically have low test scores, high dropout rates, and low graduation rates. Only a devotee of the Jeb Bush reform school would want to invite these ineffectual schools into their state. Poor New Mexico. Its acting state commissioner Hannah Skandera used to work for the Jebster himself, so whatever Florida has done to bring in for-profit hucksters must be brought to New Mexico, of course.


So New Mexico has a K12 virtual charter (listed on the New York Stock Exchange, founded by the Milken brothers), and a Connections Academy, owned by the much unloved Pearson.


Here is the study conducted by the New Mexico League of Women Voters.


Here is an article by Bonnie Burn in the Las Cruces Sun-News explaining why the League of Women Voters opposes for-profit schools. Actually, she is wrong on one point. There is a growing body of research that shows the ineffectiveness of virtual charters. However, they are highly profitable.


Will the Secretary of Education Arne Duncan speak out against for-profit virtual charters? Will elephants fly?
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog » K12 Inc. http://ift.tt/1mhtK35

Will Ohio Investigate K12 Online For-Profit Charters? | Diane Ravitch’s blog

Will Ohio Investigate K12 Online For-Profit Charters?

Diane Ravitch's blog[1]

A site to discuss better education for all

Stephen Dyer raises the question about whether Ohio[2] will follow in Florida’s path and open an investigation of the K12 for-profit school. In Ohio, K12 has classes of 51 students to a single teacher even though it is paid to have a ratio of 20:1.

That is way profitable for K12, though not for the students.

Dyer’s article includes a link to a story about the sharp drop in K12′s stock price that occurred after news of the Florida investigation broke. That story points out that K12 is under investigation in Georgia as well as Florida.

You do have to wonder at what point Secretary of Education Arne Duncan might speak out against the poor quality of online for-profit charter schools and other for-profit entrepreneurs that raid school budgets and produce terrible results. Will he?

Anthony Cody points out that for the past dozen years or so, Bill Gates has had his fun experimenting with education reform. Obsessed as he is with measurement and data, he imagined that he could impose his narrow ideas on American public schools and bring about a magical transformation.


Does American education need reform and improvement? Absolutely. Stuck as it is in the paradigm of testing and punishment, it sorely needs a revival of humanism and attention to the needs of children, families, and communities. It needs teachers who are well-prepared. It needs a recommitment o the health and happiness of children and to a deeper love of learning.


Yet Gates used HS vast wealth to steer national policy to the dry and loveless task of higher scores on tests of dubious value.


He wanted charter schools, and Arne Duncan, his faithful liege, demanded more charter schools,even if it was central to the Republican agenda.


He wanted national standards and quite willingly paid out over $2 billion to prove that one man could create the nation’s academic standards by buying off almost every group that mattered.


He wanted teachers to be evaluated based on test scores, and Ducan gave that to him too.


But says Cody, everything failed.


Cody writes:

.


“Last September Bill Gates said,


“It would be great if our education stuff worked, but that we won’t know for probably a decade.”


But, says Cody,


“I think we already know enough to declare the experiment a failure.


Value Added is a disaster. Any “reformer” who continues to support giving significant weight to such unreliable indicators should lose any credibility.


“Charter schools are, as a sector, not better than public schools, and are expanding segregation, and increasing inequality.


“The Common Core and the high stakes accountability system in which it is embedded is on its way to the graveyard of grand ideas.


“The only question remaining is how long Gates and his employees and proxies will remain wedded to their ideas, and continue to push them through their sponsored advocacy, even when these policies have been proven to be ill-founded and unworkable.


“Part of the problem with market-driven reform is that when you introduce the opportunity to make money off something like education, you unleash a feedback loop. Companies like the virtual charter chain K12 Inc can make tremendous profits, which they can use to buy off politicians, given our Supreme Court’s “Corporations are people and money is speech” philosophy. There are no systemic brakes on this train. The only way turn this around is for people to organize in large enough numbers, and act together in ways that actively disrupt and derail the operation.


“Along those lines, activists in Seattle are organizing a demonstration on June 26th, protesting the Gates Foundation at their headquarters. It has been a year and a half since I engaged the Gates Foundation in dialogue. Given the rather poor aptitude for learning Gates and company have shown, I will be joining this protest, and perhaps if enough of us are there, we can take the dialogue to the next level.”
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1iud4TU

The news earlier today that the Koch brothers are joining the fight against Common Core complicates the political calculus surrounding the controversial standards.


The Politico article gives the impression that the rightwingers are the main critics of Common Core by failing to mention that the most zealous advocates for Common Core are Jeb Bush, Michelle Rhee, Joel Klein, the Business Roundtable, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.


Anthony Cody tries to sort out the political contradictions here.


He writes:


“But blaming progressive critics of Common Core for the rise of this conservative movement turns reality on its head. The people who have let down our public schools are those who are willing to embrace standardization and high stakes tests as some sort of “progressive” guarantor of equity. We have been down this path with No Child Left Behind, which was sold to us by an alliance of liberal and neo-conservative politicians. We were told children in poverty would get more attention and resources once standardized tests “shed light” on just how far behind they were. We got teacher ‘evaluation’ schemes built around faulty VAM metrics, leading to mass demoralization and too-many losses of strong educators, simultaneous with a hypocritical push to replace seasoned teachers with Teach for America novices. The result? Intense pressure to raise test scores, narrowed curriculum, and school closings by the hundreds – all with the mantle of approval by our “liberal” leaders. Who really got played here?


“Then Common Core came along in 2009. Everyone was weary of NCLB, and ready for change. But some of us could read the writing on the wall. The fancy words about critical thinking and “moving beyond the bubble tests” sounded nice, but a closer look revealed standards that were originally written with little to no participation by K12 teachers. The promises to get rid of bubble tests only meant that the tests would be taken on expensive computers. The promise to escape the narrowing of curriculum only meant we would be testing more often, in more subjects.


“So many of us started raising concerns. The basic premise of Common Core was similar to NCLB – our schools are failing, and we must respond with “higher standards,” and more difficult tests. But the indictment of public education has been wrong from the start, and we should not lend it credence by supporting phony solutions.”


The bottom line, in my view, is that Common Core is getting increasingly controversial because of the way it was developed and imposed. The absence of a democratic process and the lack of transparency caused a lack of trust and an abundance of suspicion. In a democracy, major changes like national standards for public schools must be done with maximum sunlight and participation, not in secrecy. The fact that no amount of true grassroots opposition from parents is sufficient to alter the views of policymakers like Arne Duncan or Nee York’s Commissioner John King serves to feed the rage against Common Core, from right, left, and center, from parents and educators.


The Common Core is becoming increasingly toxic. As it becomes more controversial, its chances of survival will dim. The more that policymakers shun reasonable parents and teachers, the more frustrated the excluded become. If Common Core dies, don’t blame the Koch brothers: Blame Arne Duncan, the Gates Foundation, Achieve, David Coleman, the NGA, the CCSSO, and all those who thought that national standards could be imposed swiftly without the hard work of listening and participation that democracy requires.
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://dianeravitch.net/2014/01/07/anthony-cody-who-are-the-critics-of-common-core/

Anthony Cody follows up his brilliant analysis of the flaws of Common Core with this thoughtful projection of what to do next.


Cody believes that the standards are fatally flawed by the absence of any democratic process or review or trial.


There is also the indisputable fact that the standards were adopted by 45 states without their review but because the federal government made the adoption of “college and career ready standards” a condition for eligibility to win Race to the Top millions. This, despite the fact that the federal government is prohibited by law from exercising any direction, supervision, or control over the curriculum, instruction, or textbooks used in schools. Promoting CCSS, as Arne Duncan does, is probably illegal.


Cody concludes:


“…there is a deeper principle at stake here. Standards developed in secret without the active participation of K12 educators, parents, students and experts from the start are not acceptable or legitimate. There may be elements of the Common Core that are worthwhile, as jpatten suggests. The trouble is, we have not had any real process to debate these standards, or try them out with real children. And as indicated before, there is no process available to alter the standards in any meaningful way. According to their sponsors, they must be adopted as is, or dumped. I say dump them. Start over. Go back and fix the process – and the new standards we end up with will be better as a result.


“And for those who just want to skip over the issue of democratic process, and take the standards as a starting point, I challenge you to stop and think about the precedent being set, and the prerogatives we are handing to both the Department of Education and the Gates Foundation. This is our chance to set a completely different precedent, which would undermine rather than reinforce the prerogatives of the powerful. Isn’t that worth doing?”


My view:


Stop the Common Core testing. The students and teachers have not been prepared for the tests.


Stop the Common Core tests. The cut scores are aligned with NAEP proficient, which is a high level of achievement and not a reasonable pass-fail mark. it is guaranteed to fail–unfairly–70% of students.


This is what I hope will happen after the testing is called to a halt.


States and districts should review the standards and see how they work in real classrooms with real students.


The K-2 standards should be dropped or revised.


The arbitrary division between literature and informational text should be eliminated. It has no basis in evidence, experience, or research. If teachers want to teach all-literature or all-informational text, that is their prerogative.


Tests should be prepared and scored by teachers, as they are in other countries. The teachers not only get instant feedback, but see what their students understood and did not understand, and also learn what they did not teach well enough for most students to understand. The current Common Core tests do not provide instant feedback or item analysis, and nothing can be learned from them other than to rank students.


Bear in mind that no one can enforce the standards as written. Will the National Governors Association or the Council of Chief State School Officers sue a dozen states to stop them from improving the standards? Not likely.


Let us not forget that the central conversation here is not about test scores. It is about children, teachers, and education. What is in the best interest of our society? The Common Core causes scores to collapse. Its boosters say that is a good thing. But in the meanwhile, they are causing havoc in the lives of children, teachers, and schools. That is not a good thing, unless you believe that disruption is a thing of beauty and that something good is sure to emerge from chaos, disappointment, outrage, crushed egos, and upheaval.


Count me skeptical.
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://dianeravitch.net/2013/11/18/anthony-cody-what-happens-after-common-core-is-ousted/

Anthony Cody follows up his brilliant analysis of the flaws of Common Core with this thoughtful projection of what to do next.


Cody believes that the standards are fatally flawed by the absence of any democratic process or review or trial.


There is also the indisputable fact that the standards were adopted by 45 states without their review but because the federal government made the adoption of “college and career ready standards” a condition for eligibility to win Race to the Top millions. This, despite the fact that the federal government is prohibited by law from exercising any direction, supervision, or control over the curriculum, instruction, or textbooks used in schools. Promoting CCSS, as Arne Duncan does, is probably illegal.


Cody concludes:


“…there is a deeper principle at stake here. Standards developed in secret without the active participation of K12 educators, parents, students and experts from the start are not acceptable or legitimate. There may be elements of the Common Core that are worthwhile, as jpatten suggests. The trouble is, we have not had any real process to debate these standards, or try them out with real children. And as indicated before, there is no process available to alter the standards in any meaningful way. According to their sponsors, they must be adopted as is, or dumped. I say dump them. Start over. Go back and fix the process – and the new standards we end up with will be better as a result.


“And for those who just want to skip over the issue of democratic process, and take the standards as a starting point, I challenge you to stop and think about the precedent being set, and the prerogatives we are handing to both the Department of Education and the Gates Foundation. This is our chance to set a completely different precedent, which would undermine rather than reinforce the prerogatives of the powerful. Isn’t that worth doing?”


My view:


Stop the Common Core testing. The students and teachers have not been prepared for the tests.


Stop the Common Core tests. The cut scores are aligned with NAEP proficient, which is a high level of achievement and not a reasonable pass-fail mark. it is guaranteed to fail–unfairly–70% of students.


This is what I hope will happen after the testing is called to a halt.


States and districts should review the standards and see how they work in real classrooms with real students.


The K-2 standards should be dropped or revised.


The arbitrary division between literature and informational text should be eliminated. It has no basis in evidence, experience, or research. If teachers want to teach all-literature or all-informational text, that is their prerogative.


Tests should be prepared and scored by teachers, as they are in other countries. The teachers not only get instant feedback, but see what their students understood and did not understand, and also learn what they did not teach well enough for most students to understand. The current Common Core tests do not provide instant feedback or item analysis, and nothing can be learned from them other than to rank students.


Bear in mind that no one can enforce the standards as written. Will the National Governors Association or the Council of Chief State School Officers sue a dozen states to stop them from improving the standards? Not likely.


Let us not forget that the central conversation here is not about test scores. It is about children, teachers, and education. What is in the best interest of our society? The Common Core causes scores to collapse. Its boosters say that is a good thing. But in the meanwhile, they are causing havoc in the lives of children, teachers, and schools. That is not a good thing, unless you believe that disruption is a thing of beauty and that something good is sure to emerge from chaos, disappointment, outrage, crushed egos, and upheaval.


Count me skeptical.
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://dianeravitch.net/2013/11/18/anthony-cody-what-happens-after-common-core-is-ousted/

Anthony Cody follows up his brilliant analysis of the flaws of Common Core with this thoughtful projection of what to do next.


Cody believes that the standards are fatally flawed by the absence of any democratic process or review or trial.


There is also the indisputable fact that the standards were adopted by 45 states without their review but because the federal government made the adoption of “college and career ready standards” a condition for eligibility to win Race to the Top millions. This, despite the fact that the federal government is prohibited by law from exercising any direction, supervision, or control over the curriculum, instruction, or textbooks used in schools. Promoting CCSS, as Arne Duncan does, is probably illegal.


Cody concludes:


“…there is a deeper principle at stake here. Standards developed in secret without the active participation of K12 educators, parents, students and experts from the start are not acceptable or legitimate. There may be elements of the Common Core that are worthwhile, as jpatten suggests. The trouble is, we have not had any real process to debate these standards, or try them out with real children. And as indicated before, there is no process available to alter the standards in any meaningful way. According to their sponsors, they must be adopted as is, or dumped. I say dump them. Start over. Go back and fix the process – and the new standards we end up with will be better as a result.


“And for those who just want to skip over the issue of democratic process, and take the standards as a starting point, I challenge you to stop and think about the precedent being set, and the prerogatives we are handing to both the Department of Education and the Gates Foundation. This is our chance to set a completely different precedent, which would undermine rather than reinforce the prerogatives of the powerful. Isn’t that worth doing?”


My view:


Stop the Common Core testing. The students and teachers have not been prepared for the tests.


Stop the Common Core tests. The cut scores are aligned with NAEP proficient, which is a high level of achievement and not a reasonable pass-fail mark. it is guaranteed to fail–unfairly–70% of students.


This is what I hope will happen after the testing is called to a halt.


States and districts should review the standards and see how they work in real classrooms with real students.


The K-2 standards should be dropped or revised.


The arbitrary division between literature and informational text should be eliminated. It has no basis in evidence, experience, or research. If teachers want to teach all-literature or all-informational text, that is their prerogative.


Tests should be prepared and scored by teachers, as they are in other countries. The teachers not only get instant feedback, but see what their students understood and did not understand, and also learn what they did not teach well enough for most students to understand. The current Common Core tests do not provide instant feedback or item analysis, and nothing can be learned from them other than to rank students.


Bear in mind that no one can enforce the standards as written. Will the National Governors Association or the Council of Chief State School Officers sue a dozen states to stop them from improving the standards? Not likely.


Let us not forget that the central conversation here is not about test scores. It is about children, teachers, and education. What is in the best interest of our society? The Common Core causes scores to collapse. Its boosters say that is a good thing. But in the meanwhile, they are causing havoc in the lives of children, teachers, and schools. That is not a good thing, unless you believe that disruption is a thing of beauty and that something good is sure to emerge from chaos, disappointment, outrage, crushed egos, and upheaval.


Count me skeptical.
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://dianeravitch.net/2013/11/18/anthony-cody-what-happens-after-common-core-is-ousted/