Maine Virtual Academy Celebrates Start of 2016-2017 School Year

Statewide online school welcomes students back on August 29th

August 26, 2016 04:02 PM Eastern Daylight Time

AUGUSTA, Maine–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Maine Virtual Academy (MEVA),a statewide online public charter
school, will begin the 2016-2017 school year on August 29. As an online
public school program authorized by the Maine Charter School Commission,
MEVA is tuition-free for students in grades 7-12 who reside anywhere in
the state.

The first day of school for MEVA students is August 29!

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MEVA incorporates online lessons and instruction from highly qualified,
Maine-licensed teachers who monitor student progress, provide
professional insight, and work in partnership with parents. Teachers
communicate with students and parents via phone, email and the online
classroom technology in order to provide an individualized approach that
helps prepare students for post-graduation career or college success.

“At Maine Virtual Academy we ensure the success of our students through
a dedicated approach to individualized education,” said Dr. Melinda
Browne, Head of School of Maine Virtual Academy. “Our teachers work
closely with students and their families to develop an individual
learning plan, which allows each student to work at their own pace and
meet his or her academic goals. We have an exciting year ahead of us and
look forward to our students’ continued success both in class and in the
MEVA community.”

Students can chose from a diverse middle school and high school K12catalog
of courses, including many electives that are not offered in traditional
schools. Students have the freedom to progress through lessons at their
own pace, while receiving quality instruction, support, and individual
attention from teachers. The school also offers clubs, school outings,
dances and other activities to foster community.

MEVA students receive instruction from their teachers during live,
interactive online classes, as well as through recorded sessions.
Teachers are also available to students and their Learning Coachesvia
email, phone and one-on-one online instruction.

MEVA is authorized by the Maine Charter School Commission and is
governed by an independent, non-profit board of directors. The school’s
team of educators and school leaders are based at the school’s
administrative headquarters. Interested families are encouraged to visit meva.k12.com
for more information on the school and how to enroll.

About Maine Virtual Academy

Maine Virtual Academy (MEVA) is a full-time online public school program
that serves students in grades 7 through 12. Authorized by the Maine
Charter School Commission, MEVA is available tuition-free to students in
the state of Maine and utilizes the award-winning curriculum from K12
Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary
curriculum and online education programs for grades K-12. For more
information about MEVA, visit meva.k12.com.

Contacts

Maine Virtual Academy (MEVA)Donna Savarese, 703-436-3273dsavarese@k12.com

Pikes Peak Early College Teams with Fuel Education to Help Students Earn College Credit and Professional Certifications during High School

Students across Colorado can apply to enroll for the 2016-2017 school
year now to get a free community college education

August 08, 2016 08:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time

HERNDON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–According to a
report
from the Georgetown
Center on Education and the Workforce
, by 2020, 65 percent of all
jobs in the economy will require post-secondary education or training
beyond high school. Therefore, students who still experience barriers to
achieving this level of education will have limited workforce options.
To help students overcome these barriers, Pikes
Peak Early College
(PPEC) helps students start working toward
post-secondary degrees and certifications in high school.

“A college degree or a professional certification doesn’t have to be
this elusive thing students can’t grasp”

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PPEC provides students online core, elective and career technical
education courses from Fuel
Education
™ (FuelEd™). The program uses the personalized learning
platform PEAK™, in combination with personalized college and career
counseling, to create a customized degree plan based on each student’s
interests, strengths, and goals for the future. PPEC works with both
FuelEd online teachers, as well as district-employed teachers, to
facilitate a blended learning model.

“Many of our students are first-generation college students or are part
of populations that are under-represented in post-secondary
institutions,” said Dave Knoche, Executive Principal at PPEC. “PPEC
provides these students with the monetary, academic, and emotional
support they need to achieve their goals after high school. If we didn’t
help these students, it would be an enormous disservice to our youth and
our society.”

PPEC students focus on getting more than just a high school diploma.
They are working toward an associate’s degree, 60 credits to transfer to
a four-year college or a professional certification all while completing
their high school requirements. To determine what route is best for each
student, PPEC’s college and career counseling staff members conduct
individual meetings to determine each student’s interests and then
create an appropriate degree plan. This individualized degree plan takes
into account their current college and career readiness skills, their
passions, and their plans for the future. Throughout their four to six
years at PPEC, students receive personalized advisory services to make
sure they are on track with their degree plan, that their plan continues
to fit their skill level and future interests, and that their credits
will transfer to the post-secondary institution or certification program
of their choice.

Once their degree plans are made, students begin working on their high
school coursework using FuelEd
Online Courses
. Students take a combination of online core classes
to meet graduation requirements and online elective courses to help them
hone their interests for college study or their future career. The
school also plans on using FuelEd’s Career
Readiness Pathways™
for students interested in a career technical
education. Courses center around one of four Career Clusters: business
management and administration, manufacturing, health science, and
information technology.

Because they can complete their coursework online, students only attend
a physical school three days a week. When students are on campus,
teachers lead project-based learning activities to compliment the FuelEd
Online Courses. The remaining two days are open for students to study at
home, participate in internships or shadowing opportunities, or attend
classes on college campuses. In addition to being the only early college
with a blended model in Colorado, what makes PPEC so unique is that each
student can take up to 15 credits per semester at no cost to them, thus
greatly alleviating the financial burden of attending college for
students and their families.

However, not every student is ready to start taking college courses as a
freshman. For students who need remediation prior to taking
college-level courses, PPEC creates custom skill-enhancement classes.
Using PEAK, PPEC determines which skills each student is missing and
designs a custom course by piecing together units and lessons from
various FuelEd Online Courses to ensure each student learns the concepts
they need prior to taking college-level courses . Traditionally, any
college student who needs remediation must pay for and take remedial
courses, which do not count for credit. By completing remedial courses
during high school, PPEC is, once again, helping students save money and
streamline the college experience.

“A college degree or a professional certification doesn’t have to be
this elusive thing students can’t grasp,” said Knoche. “In addition to
our personalized counseling and flexible learning environment, we are
guiding students in the direction of a four-year college, but in a
fiscally responsible way so students aren’t riddled with debt. We’re not
just educating, we’re changing lives.”

To learn more about PPEC, visit d49.org/ppec.
Students from all over the state of Colorado are eligible to apply. To
learn more about the enrollment process for the 2016-17 school year,
click here.

About Fuel Education

Fuel Education™ partners with school districts to fuel personalized
learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the
classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through
12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and
blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning
Platform, PEAK™, enables teachers to customize courses using their own
content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open
educational resources. Fuel Education offers one of the industry’s
largest catalogs of K–12 digital curriculum, certified instruction,
professional development, and educational services. FuelEd has helped
2,000 school districts to improve student outcomes and better serve
diverse student populations. To learn more, visit getfueled.com and Twitter.

©2016 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education, PEAK,
and FuelEd are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All
other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Contacts

Fuel EducationBeth Halloran, 703.436.3263bhalloran@getfueled.comorRachael
Ballard, 410.975.9638Rachael@kehcomm.com

UPDATE: Silicon Valley Flex Academy closes due to financial hardship

Parents left scrambling to find new schools

Posted:

UPDATE: Silicon Valley Flex Academy closes due to financial hardship

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Hundreds of families were caught by surprise July 26 when they received email notification that Morgan Hill-based Silicon Valley Flex Academy was closing its doors less than three weeks before the start of the new school year.

Those parents—a majority whose children have special needs—are now scrambling to find new schools for their children.

“It was like being sucker-punched,” said single father Chris McKie, whose 13-year-old son who suffers from dyslexia was expecting to start the eighth grade at Flex as a first-year student. “It just knocked the wind out of our sails.”

But the school has a history of financial unsteadiness going back several months. County education officials have questioned Flex’s operational viability after discovering the academy had been submitting late and inconsistent financial statements and was regularly delinquent in its payment of county oversight fees and CALSTRS retirement payments.

McKie, however, met with the Flex principal and special education staff earlier in the summer before deciding on enrolling his son there and “it seemed to be a perfect match,” he said.

Flex, a free public charter school authorized through the Santa Clara County Office of Education beginning in 2011, was granted a five-year renewal from the county board back in November 2015. The 6th through 12th grade secondary school, located at 610 Jarvis Drive, boasted a blended learning model by combining an online K12, Inc. curriculum with offline lessons and small-sized breakout sessions.

However, in the July 27 email authored by Flex Board President Mark Kushner, parents were notified that the school was closing. Kushner blamed the school’s service provider K12 for terminating its service contract with Flex on July 1.

“While the Board disagrees with K12’s grounds to terminate the service contract, it cannot operate the school without K12’s financial support, and does not have alternative funding for the school,” Kushner wrote. “Silicon Valley Flex has served its students and families well for the past five years, and our sincere hope was to find a way to ensure it could continue to do so. Sadly, in the past week it became clear that we are simply out of options and can wait no longer.”

For the past five years, K12 provided all of its products and services, including on-site staff to Flex, at no fee for each upcoming year, according to Mike Kraft, Vice President of Communications for K12.

“However, even with this, the school’s budget could not support the school’s operations. In the past, although not contractually obligated to do so, K12 had advanced the school additional funding to cover this structural deficit,” Kraft explained. “The company was not, however, able to do so going forward and made the board aware of this in the Fall of 2015.”

Flex is the only K12 school in California that is closing, Kraft said.

Parents surprised

Kushner’s message came as a complete shock to parent Mary Joy, whose 12-year-old son with Asperger’s syndrome was planning to enter his second year at Flex as a seventh grader.

“I’m definitely frustrated because apparently they’ve known since the first of July. I understand they were trying to pull out all the stops in trying to figure out a way to stay open,” Joy said. “But it definitely would have been useful to get this information to families at that time.”

Joy explained that Flex was “a really good fit” for her son with flexible scheduling and small class sizes. Now, with the 2016-17 school year only weeks away, there are “very limited options” in Morgan Hill for her son and it would be difficult to home-school since she and her husband both work.

McKie said he’s already been in contact with staff at Morgan Hill Unified School District and is considering Britton Middle School for his son, but is still looking for other options.

“Two and half weeks before the start of school is a huge surprise. I can’t even guess what all the other families who are affected are going through,” McKie said. “It must be a mad scramble.”

In March, the Times published a story about the county’s concerns over Flex’s operations and the possibility of revoking its charter if they were not fixed. County staff claimed “significant” discrepancies with Flex’s finances and enrollment numbers. However, then head of school Caroline Wood brushed off any concerns as minor, claimed to have “a great working relationship” with county staff and even slammed the Times report in a rebuttal letter to the editor.

“Ultimately, I don’t think this is going to slow the school down,” said Wood in March. She claimed then that Flex had 314 students enrolled for the 2016-17 school year with even more expected to commit prior to the start of school.

County board member Claudia Rossi, of Morgan Hill, originally voted in favor of the five-year renewal back in November that passed by a 5-2 margin, but became increasingly wary of Flex since then.

“It’s not unexpected. We are not surprised,” said Rossi when contacted Wednesday morning. “At the time, our board did everything it could to be as supportive as possible. They fell under their own weight.”

Rossi said county staff was constantly dealing with issue after issue regarding Flex but it is their role as authorizers to be supportive and work with them to remedy any shortcomings. In the November renewal hearing, Rossi said Flex officials told the county board that enrollment was up, staffing was fine, funding was not a problem and they were being creative to make the school viable.

“The parent community was asking us to give them a chance to succeed,” said Rossi, who added that MHUSD was made aware of Flex’s situation and has been in contact with local families.

Kushner explained in his email on behalf of the entire Flex board that “this late notice is very unfortunate,” but they did not want to put families in an even worse situation by closing mid-year.

“Our first and highest priority is always the wellbeing of the students,” said County Superintendent Jon Gundry, who has been in contact with MHUSD Superintendent Steve Betando “to ensure students and families will have options and opportunities following this decision by the Silicon Valley Flex Academy board.”

K12, the school’s service provider that pulled the funding, has been under fire by state officials, recently agreeing to a multi-million dollar settlement in a case brought by the California Attorney General’s Office. A story on the settlement and the AG’s accusations can be viewed at morganhilltimes.com.

Scott Forstner is a general assignment reporter who covers education and other community issues for the Morgan Hill Times. Reach him at (408) 963-0122 or via email at sforstner@morganhilltimes.com

The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning Applauds the Selection of Board Member Dr. Rod Paige to the National Charter Schools Hall of Fame

Former U.S. Secretary of Education recognized as a champion of strong school options for America’s children

CASTLE ROCK, CO (PRWEB) June 14, 2016

Dr. Rod Paige, former U.S. Secretary of Education and a founding member of the Foundation for Blended and Online Learning’s Board of Directors, has been selected as a 2016 inductee to the National Charter Schools Hall of Fame. Established by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools in 2007, the Hall of Fame recognizes individuals and organizations for their commitment to the development and growth of innovative public charter schools. Dr. Paige joins fellow 2016 inductees Bill Kurtz and Kim Smith. They will be honored June 28th in Nashville at the 16th Annual National Charter Schools Conference.

Amy Valentine, Executive Director of the Foundation for Blended and Online Learning, said, “Dr. Paige has long championed greater access to different school options, including online, blended, and traditional charter schools. Induction into the National Charter Schools Hall of Fame is a testament to his relentless pursuit of educational equality and opportunity for America’s children. I am just as inspired as they are by Dr. Paige’s passionate advocacy for school choice and education reform on behalf of families around the country.”

Kevin P. Chavous, Chairman of the Foundation’s Board of Directors, said, “Rod has dedicated his life to the improvement of our nation’s schools, closing the persistent achievement gaps separating our students, and providing educational options to families regardless of their zip code. I am thrilled to see my friend and colleague celebrated for his tireless leadership by the national charter school community.”

About The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning

The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning is an independent charitable education organization. The mission of the foundation is to empower students through personalized learning by advancing the availability and quality of blended and online learning opportunities and outcomes. To become involved with The Foundation or to learn more, visit http://www.blendedandonlinelearning.org.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/06/prweb13482681.htm

California Virtual Academies defend online charter schools as model of school choice

By Jessica Calefati, jcalefati@bayareanewsgroup.com

Posted:
 
04/19/2016 05:26:24 AM PDT

In a vigorous defense, officials behind the California Virtual Academies branded this news organization’s investigation into their online charter schools “wrong and insulting” and an attack against a model of school choice.

But critics of K12 Inc., the Wall Street-traded company that runs the profitable but low-performing academies, called for greater oversight of its practices.

The newspaper’s two-day series examined how K12 Inc., reaps tens of millions of dollars in state funding while graduating fewer than half of the students enrolled in its high schools.

Elizabeth Novak-Galloway, 12, who used to be an A student, received C s because she was missing work she never knew had been assigned, her mother said. (Dai Sugano, Bay Area News Group)
(
Dai Sugano
)

In a letter sent to teachers Monday afternoon, the schools’ academic administrator, April Warren, called the newspaper’s investigative series “a gross mischaracterization of all of the work that you all do on a regular basis.” But despite their broad condemnations, neither Warren nor other school officials alleged any specific factual inaccuracies in the series.

The investigation, published Sunday and Monday, also reported that teachers have been asked to inflate attendance and enrollment records used to determine taxpayer funding.

K12 says the schools operate independently and are locally controlled. But the newspaper’s review of the academies’ contracts, tax records and other financial information suggest the Virginia-based company calls the shots, operating the schools to make money by taking advantage of laws governing charters and nonprofit organizations. K12’s heavily marketed model in California has helped the company collect more than $310 million in state funding over the past 12 years.

State Sen. Jim Beall, D-San Jose, said the performance of any publicly financed school should be a matter of concern for taxpayers — and lawmakers.

“Charter schools were created to give parents and students an alternative to how public schools were delivering instruction,” Beall said Monday. “But it has never been the state’s intent to permit online for-profit charter schools to fail students or gouge taxpayers. Students must not be viewed as cash cows.”

However, the company, a top administrator for the online school network and the board of directors for one of the academies serving Bay Area students all released similarly worded statements Monday, blasting the newspaper’s investigation.

Together, members of the California Virtual Academy at San Mateo’s board of directors called allegations that they have “any other interest except for our children” and their families both “wrong and insulting.”

The statement said the network of online schools has for years endured similar attacks on its track record from charter opponents and the California Teachers Association, which is attempting to unionize employees at the schools.

“Parents want choice in education,” the statement said. “Students deserve options because one size does not fit all. We love our school.”

The board insisted in its statement that each of the K12-partner schools are “governed independently by their nonprofit school boards made up of California residents including parents, educators, and local community leaders.”

The newspaper’s investigation revealed that two of the four board members at the San Mateo County school — board president Don Burbulys and member Stephen Warren — are related to top academy administrators who are hand-picked by K12.

Burbulys, who is married to Dean of Students Laura Terrazas, lives in Soquel in Santa Cruz County, and Warren, who is the brother-in-law of April Warren, lives in Riverside County.

Defending her brother-in-law’s oversight of her work, April Warren wrote in her letter to teachers that “relatives are permitted to serve on a California nonprofit board” and that “several school districts have people who sit on their boards that are either parents, employees or are related to employees of the district that they serve.”

The California Charter Schools Association and California Teachers Association on Monday said the Legislature should take a hard look at whether for-profit companies like K12 should be operating schools in California and whether the state can do more to ensure charter schools are overseen properly.

“When taxpayer money is used to fund education, those dollars should go to help kids,” said California Teachers Association President Eric Heins. “In this case, we have no idea how the company is spending our tax dollars and it’s not right. This is pretty basic stuff.”

Online charter schools only work with a fraction of the kids enrolled in California’s roughly 1,200 charters, but that doesn’t mean they should be held to a lower standard of accountability, said Emily Bertelli, a spokeswoman for the California Charter Schools Association, which publicly called for the closure of a K12-run school in 2011 only to see the school reopened with a new name under the same authorizer.

Former Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman said in an interview Monday that none of the newspaper’s findings surprised him. He said he’d seen many of the same issues unfold in his state, where he tried, and failed to shut down K12’s Tennessee Virtual Academy because of poor performance.

“This company’s efforts to grow bear no relationship whatsoever to the quality of their results in California and across the country,” Huffman said.

“You would hope that an online virtual school — especially one run by a for-profit company — would only have the opportunity to grow with really high-quality results,” Huffman said. “K12 isn’t coming close to meeting a high bar in terms of quality.”

One Redwood City parent who contacted this newspaper, saying the investigative series “hit close to home,” said his son, who is now a sophomore in college, took K12’s advanced courses, earned A’s and B’s and finished at the top of his class when he was a student at one of the company-run California schools. But when his son applied to a local community college, he was stunned to learn he had to take remedial math and English courses because he was so far behind.

Other parents, however, contacted the newspaper to defend the schools, saying the online learning model was vital to their sons’ and daughters’ academic success.

Maureen Behlen said her son thrived in K12’s school because she “put everything into it,” spending several hours a day teaching him and guiding him through his coursework. She said an online school isn’t the right fit for families who can’t devote as much time to the program as she did.

“Would you send a bunch of kids into a classroom with no teachers? Of course not,” said Behlen, who lives in the foothills in East San Jose. “There has to be an adult responsible for overseeing what they’re learning, and if there isn’t, you’re setting them up to fail.”

Contact Jessica Calefati at 916-441-2101. Follow her at Twitter.com/Calefati.

California Virtual Academies defend online charter schools as model of school choice

By Jessica Calefati, jcalefati@bayareanewsgroup.com

Posted:
 
04/19/2016 05:26:24 AM PDT

In a vigorous defense, officials behind the California Virtual Academies branded this news organization’s investigation into their online charter schools “wrong and insulting” and an attack against a model of school choice.

But critics of K12 Inc., the Wall Street-traded company that runs the profitable but low-performing academies, called for greater oversight of its practices.

The newspaper’s two-day series examined how K12 Inc., reaps tens of millions of dollars in state funding while graduating fewer than half of the students enrolled in its high schools.

Elizabeth Novak-Galloway, 12, who used to be an A student, received C s because she was missing work she never knew had been assigned, her mother said.
Elizabeth Novak-Galloway, 12, who used to be an A student, received C s because she was missing work she never knew had been assigned, her mother said. (Dai Sugano, Bay Area News Group)
(
Dai Sugano
)

In a letter sent to teachers Monday afternoon, the schools’ academic administrator, April Warren, called the newspaper’s investigative series “a gross mischaracterization of all of the work that you all do on a regular basis.” But despite their broad condemnations, neither Warren nor other school officials alleged any specific factual inaccuracies in the series.

The investigation, published Sunday and Monday, also reported that teachers have been asked to inflate attendance and enrollment records used to determine taxpayer funding.

K12 says the schools operate independently and are locally controlled. But the newspaper’s review of the academies’ contracts, tax records and other financial information suggest the Virginia-based company calls the shots, operating the schools to make money by taking advantage of laws governing charters and nonprofit organizations. K12’s heavily marketed model in California has helped the company collect more than $310 million in state funding over the past 12 years.

State Sen. Jim Beall, D-San Jose, said the performance of any publicly financed school should be a matter of concern for taxpayers — and lawmakers.

“Charter schools were created to give parents and students an alternative to how public schools were delivering instruction,” Beall said Monday. “But it has never been the state’s intent to permit online for-profit charter schools to fail students or gouge taxpayers. Students must not be viewed as cash cows.”

However, the company, a top administrator for the online school network and the board of directors for one of the academies serving Bay Area students all released similarly worded statements Monday, blasting the newspaper’s investigation.

Together, members of the California Virtual Academy at San Mateo’s board of directors called allegations that they have “any other interest except for our children” and their families both “wrong and insulting.”

The statement said the network of online schools has for years endured similar attacks on its track record from charter opponents and the California Teachers Association, which is attempting to unionize employees at the schools.

“Parents want choice in education,” the statement said. “Students deserve options because one size does not fit all. We love our school.”

The board insisted in its statement that each of the K12-partner schools are “governed independently by their nonprofit school boards made up of California residents including parents, educators, and local community leaders.”

The newspaper’s investigation revealed that two of the four board members at the San Mateo County school — board president Don Burbulys and member Stephen Warren — are related to top academy administrators who are hand-picked by K12.

Burbulys, who is married to Dean of Students Laura Terrazas, lives in Soquel in Santa Cruz County, and Warren, who is the brother-in-law of April Warren, lives in Riverside County.

Defending her brother-in-law’s oversight of her work, April Warren wrote in her letter to teachers that “relatives are permitted to serve on a California nonprofit board” and that “several school districts have people who sit on their boards that are either parents, employees or are related to employees of the district that they serve.”

The California Charter Schools Association and California Teachers Association on Monday said the Legislature should take a hard look at whether for-profit companies like K12 should be operating schools in California and whether the state can do more to ensure charter schools are overseen properly.

“When taxpayer money is used to fund education, those dollars should go to help kids,” said California Teachers Association President Eric Heins. “In this case, we have no idea how the company is spending our tax dollars and it’s not right. This is pretty basic stuff.”

Online charter schools only work with a fraction of the kids enrolled in California’s roughly 1,200 charters, but that doesn’t mean they should be held to a lower standard of accountability, said Emily Bertelli, a spokeswoman for the California Charter Schools Association, which publicly called for the closure of a K12-run school in 2011 only to see the school reopened with a new name under the same authorizer.

Former Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman said in an interview Monday that none of the newspaper’s findings surprised him. He said he’d seen many of the same issues unfold in his state, where he tried, and failed to shut down K12’s Tennessee Virtual Academy because of poor performance.

“This company’s efforts to grow bear no relationship whatsoever to the quality of their results in California and across the country,” Huffman said.

“You would hope that an online virtual school — especially one run by a for-profit company — would only have the opportunity to grow with really high-quality results,” Huffman said. “K12 isn’t coming close to meeting a high bar in terms of quality.”

One Redwood City parent who contacted this newspaper, saying the investigative series “hit close to home,” said his son, who is now a sophomore in college, took K12’s advanced courses, earned A’s and B’s and finished at the top of his class when he was a student at one of the company-run California schools. But when his son applied to a local community college, he was stunned to learn he had to take remedial math and English courses because he was so far behind.

Other parents, however, contacted the newspaper to defend the schools, saying the online learning model was vital to their sons’ and daughters’ academic success.

Maureen Behlen said her son thrived in K12’s school because she “put everything into it,” spending several hours a day teaching him and guiding him through his coursework. She said an online school isn’t the right fit for families who can’t devote as much time to the program as she did.

“Would you send a bunch of kids into a classroom with no teachers? Of course not,” said Behlen, who lives in the foothills in East San Jose. “There has to be an adult responsible for overseeing what they’re learning, and if there isn’t, you’re setting them up to fail.”

Contact Jessica Calefati at 916-441-2101. Follow her at Twitter.com/Calefati.

Enrollment open for online school, California Virtual Academy @ San Diego

Wednesday, March 30, 2016 courtesy Education 0 comments

Education

Enrollment for San Diego area students in grades K-12 is now open for the full-time, tuition-free, online public school, California Virtual Academy @ San Diego (CAVA@ San Diego). The public school option uses the engaging, award-winning K12 curriculum. Students who enroll in CAVA@ San Diego receive an individualized education experience designed to their learning style and needs.

CAVA@ San Diego is part of a network of 11 schools in California that use the K¹² online curriculum to offer students in grades K–12 an exceptional learning experience. Families enroll in CAVA@ San Diego for a wide variety of reasons. Some students are advanced learners, motivated to increase their knowledge beyond the basic course offerings, while others are athletes or performers looking to balance a full schedule. Innovative technology combined with a strong partnership between families and teachers makes it possible to focus on each student’s unique academic needs, and gives a growing number of San Diego students a powerful educational option to reach their true potential.

“The teachers, parents, curriculum and school community all come together at CAVA@ San Diego to create a truly well-rounded educational experience for each child,” Katrina Abston, Senior Head of Schools for California Virtual Academies. “More than being unique because of our flexible virtual school setting, CAVA@ San Diego stands out because of our focus on individualized learning.”

Students who enroll at CAVA@ San Diego receive an individualized learning program that includes web-based lessons along with age-appropriate instructional materials – books, videos, CDs and other hands-on tools and resources.

Teachers for CAVA@ San Diego are California-credentialed and provide instruction, guidance and support, and regularly interact with students and parents via email, web-based classrooms, online discussions, phone and face-to-face meetings.

In addition to the academic focus, CAVA@ San Diego provides several social engagement opportunities for students. The school year is filled with numerous field trips, school activities, community service opportunities and weekly face-to-face meet-up for students.

CAVA@ San Diego is accepting enrollment of students for the 2016-2017 school year. For a complete list of information sessions or to learn more about enrolling, visit http://cava.k12.com or call 866-339-6787.

About California Virtual Academy@ San Diego
California Virtual Academy@ San Diego is a tuition-free, online public school serving students in kindergarten through 12th grade who are residents of Imperial, Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties. California-credentialed teachers deliver lessons in an online classroom platform provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN) with a combination of engaging online and offline coursework—including a wide variety of books, CDs, videos, and hands-on materials that make learning come alive. CAVA @ San Diego provides opportunities for advanced learners, and prepares students to be college and career ready at graduation. Learn more at http://cava.k12.com.

This article is a courtesy release.

courtesy

This author is used when OC Breeze publishes news releases from other organizations.

2016-17 School Year Enrollment Now Open for Oregon Virtual Academy

School Offers Unique “Blended Learning” Setting, Providing Both Online and In-Person Instruction

Mar 23, 2016, 06:00 ET
from Oregon Virtual Academy

NORTH BEND, Ore., March 23, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Enrollment in the full-time, tuition-free, online public school, Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA), is now open for the 2016-17 school year. ORVA serves students in grades K-12 who reside in Oregon.  The public school option uses the engaging, award-winning K12 curriculum. Students who enroll in ORVA receive an individualized education experience designed to their learning style and needs.

“The teachers, parents, curriculum and school community all come together at Oregon Virtual Academy to create a truly well-rounded educational experience for each child,” says Head of School Brandy Osborn. “More than being unique because of our flexible virtual school setting, ORVA stands out because of our focus on individualized learning.”

ORVA’s focus on individualized learning is designed to allow students discover their own learning style. ORVA gives advanced learners the ability to progress faster in subjects in which they excel, including opportunities for advancement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and the ability to earn college credits while in high school.

Now in its 9th year, ORVA hosts in-person information sessions around the state each month, online information sessions, and upcoming community events. Interested families are encouraged to visit the school’s website for details on these upcoming events, as well as more about ORVA and how to enroll.

For more information on ORVA, its unique individualized learning focus and the enrollment process, please visit http://www.orva.k12.com 

About Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA) is an online public charter school authorized by the North Bend School District and open to students in grades K through 12. As part of the Oregon public school system, ORVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about ORVA, visit www.k12.com/orva.  

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SOURCE Oregon Virtual Academy

Related Links

http://www.K12.com

A new, for-profit charter chain named Pansophic is planning to take over charter chain schools in Ohio. The linked story was published in June, but there have been no follow-ups since then. Either the deal was completed or is pending.

Pansophic is a new company founded by Ron Packard, formerly of McKinsey, Goldman Sachs, and the online giant K12. As CEO of K12, Packard was paid $5 million yearly.

The company also expects to acquire charters run by for-profit Mosaica in Ohio. Pansophic will become the biggest for-profit charter chain in Ohio.

“Akron-based White Hat Management reportedly sold off management of 12 elementary charter schools Friday to an out-of-state, for-profit company that could acquire a third charter school company, an attorney for the charter schools’ public boards said.

“The two deals would make Pansophic Learning the largest for-profit operator of Ohio charter schools, which has become a taxpayer-funded $1 billion private industry.”

White Hat has produced poor academic results for 20 years.

Now, Ohio’s for-profit charter schools will be outsourced to a Virginia corporation that also focuses on the bottom line: profit.

Are these for-profit schools really public schools or are they profit centers that hoodwink parents to enroll their children?

This is what Ohio’s charter law says (thanks to reader Bethree):

“Opening paras of Ohio charter school law: “3314.01 (A) (1) A board of education may permit all or part of any of the schools under its control, upon request of a proposing person or group and provided the person or group meets the requirements of this chapter, to become a community school… (B) A community school created under this chapter is a public school, independent of any school district, and is part of the state’s program of education…”

Is a school owned by a for-profit corporation in Virginia still a “community” school? Is it a “public” school?

How much more of this flimflam will the voters and taxpayers of Ohio tolerate? Do they care about the education of their children?

via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1NMoKVE

A new, for-profit charter chain named Pansophic is planning to take over charter chain schools in Ohio. The linked story was published in June, but there have been no follow-ups since then. Either the deal was completed or is pending.

Pansophic is a new company founded by Ron Packard, formerly of McKinsey, Goldman Sachs, and the online giant K12. As CEO of K12, Packard was paid $5 million yearly.

The company also expects to acquire charters run by for-profit Mosaica in Ohio. Pansophic will become the biggest for-profit charter chain in Ohio.

“Akron-based White Hat Management reportedly sold off management of 12 elementary charter schools Friday to an out-of-state, for-profit company that could acquire a third charter school company, an attorney for the charter schools’ public boards said.

“The two deals would make Pansophic Learning the largest for-profit operator of Ohio charter schools, which has become a taxpayer-funded $1 billion private industry.”

White Hat has produced poor academic results for 20 years.

Now, Ohio’s for-profit charter schools will be outsourced to a Virginia corporation that also focuses on the bottom line: profit.

Are these for-profit schools really public schools or are they profit centers that hoodwink parents to enroll their children?

This is what Ohio’s charter law says (thanks to reader Bethree):

“Opening paras of Ohio charter school law: “3314.01 (A) (1) A board of education may permit all or part of any of the schools under its control, upon request of a proposing person or group and provided the person or group meets the requirements of this chapter, to become a community school… (B) A community school created under this chapter is a public school, independent of any school district, and is part of the state’s program of education…”

Is a school owned by a for-profit corporation in Virginia still a “community” school? Is it a “public” school?

How much more of this flimflam will the voters and taxpayers of Ohio tolerate? Do they care about the education of their children?

via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1NMoKVE