A new, for-profit charter chain named Pansophic is planning to take over charter chain schools in Ohio. The linked story was published in June, but there have been no follow-ups since then. Either the deal was completed or is pending.

Pansophic is a new company founded by Ron Packard, formerly of McKinsey, Goldman Sachs, and the online giant K12. As CEO of K12, Packard was paid $5 million yearly.

The company also expects to acquire charters run by for-profit Mosaica in Ohio. Pansophic will become the biggest for-profit charter chain in Ohio.

“Akron-based White Hat Management reportedly sold off management of 12 elementary charter schools Friday to an out-of-state, for-profit company that could acquire a third charter school company, an attorney for the charter schools’ public boards said.

“The two deals would make Pansophic Learning the largest for-profit operator of Ohio charter schools, which has become a taxpayer-funded $1 billion private industry.”

White Hat has produced poor academic results for 20 years.

Now, Ohio’s for-profit charter schools will be outsourced to a Virginia corporation that also focuses on the bottom line: profit.

Are these for-profit schools really public schools or are they profit centers that hoodwink parents to enroll their children?

This is what Ohio’s charter law says (thanks to reader Bethree):

“Opening paras of Ohio charter school law: “3314.01 (A) (1) A board of education may permit all or part of any of the schools under its control, upon request of a proposing person or group and provided the person or group meets the requirements of this chapter, to become a community school… (B) A community school created under this chapter is a public school, independent of any school district, and is part of the state’s program of education…”

Is a school owned by a for-profit corporation in Virginia still a “community” school? Is it a “public” school?

How much more of this flimflam will the voters and taxpayers of Ohio tolerate? Do they care about the education of their children?

via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1NMoKVE

A new, for-profit charter chain named Pansophic is planning to take over charter chain schools in Ohio. The linked story was published in June, but there have been no follow-ups since then. Either the deal was completed or is pending.

Pansophic is a new company founded by Ron Packard, formerly of McKinsey, Goldman Sachs, and the online giant K12. As CEO of K12, Packard was paid $5 million yearly.

The company also expects to acquire charters run by for-profit Mosaica in Ohio. Pansophic will become the biggest for-profit charter chain in Ohio.

“Akron-based White Hat Management reportedly sold off management of 12 elementary charter schools Friday to an out-of-state, for-profit company that could acquire a third charter school company, an attorney for the charter schools’ public boards said.

“The two deals would make Pansophic Learning the largest for-profit operator of Ohio charter schools, which has become a taxpayer-funded $1 billion private industry.”

White Hat has produced poor academic results for 20 years.

Now, Ohio’s for-profit charter schools will be outsourced to a Virginia corporation that also focuses on the bottom line: profit.

Are these for-profit schools really public schools or are they profit centers that hoodwink parents to enroll their children?

This is what Ohio’s charter law says (thanks to reader Bethree):

“Opening paras of Ohio charter school law: “3314.01 (A) (1) A board of education may permit all or part of any of the schools under its control, upon request of a proposing person or group and provided the person or group meets the requirements of this chapter, to become a community school… (B) A community school created under this chapter is a public school, independent of any school district, and is part of the state’s program of education…”

Is a school owned by a for-profit corporation in Virginia still a “community” school? Is it a “public” school?

How much more of this flimflam will the voters and taxpayers of Ohio tolerate? Do they care about the education of their children?

via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1NMoKVE

A new, for-profit charter chain named Pansophic is planning to take over charter chain schools in Ohio. The linked story was published in June, but there have been no follow-ups since then. Either the deal was completed or is pending.

Pansophic is a new company founded by Ron Packard, formerly of McKinsey, Goldman Sachs, and the online giant K12. As CEO of K12, Packard was paid $5 million yearly.

The company also expects to acquire charters run by for-profit Mosaica in Ohio. Pansophic will become the biggest for-profit charter chain in Ohio.

“Akron-based White Hat Management reportedly sold off management of 12 elementary charter schools Friday to an out-of-state, for-profit company that could acquire a third charter school company, an attorney for the charter schools’ public boards said.

“The two deals would make Pansophic Learning the largest for-profit operator of Ohio charter schools, which has become a taxpayer-funded $1 billion private industry.”

White Hat has produced poor academic results for 20 years.

Now, Ohio’s for-profit charter schools will be outsourced to a Virginia corporation that also focuses on the bottom line: profit.

Are these for-profit schools really public schools or are they profit centers that hoodwink parents to enroll their children?

This is what Ohio’s charter law says (thanks to reader Bethree):

“Opening paras of Ohio charter school law: “3314.01 (A) (1) A board of education may permit all or part of any of the schools under its control, upon request of a proposing person or group and provided the person or group meets the requirements of this chapter, to become a community school… (B) A community school created under this chapter is a public school, independent of any school district, and is part of the state’s program of education…”

Is a school owned by a for-profit corporation in Virginia still a “community” school? Is it a “public” school?

How much more of this flimflam will the voters and taxpayers of Ohio tolerate? Do they care about the education of their children?

via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1NMoKVE

Minnesota Virtual Academy to Begin 14th School Year Serving Students Statewide

Minnesota Virtual Academy to Begin 14th School Year Serving Students Statewide – Tuition-free online public school recognized for improved outcomes; continues accepting enrollments –

Minnesota Virtual Academy, a program of Houston Public Schools

HOUSTON, Minn., Sept. 2, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Minnesota Virtual Academy (MNVA), an accredited, tuition-free, online public school, welcomes new and returning students for the 2015-2016 academic year, which begins September 8. Now entering its 14th year of serving students across the state of Minnesota, MNVA takes an individualized approach to learning by combining online instruction and hands-on curriculum with the support of Minnesota-licensed teachers and an active school community.

MNVA will host a back-to-school open house for students and their parents on Friday, September 11, 2015, in Plymouth, Minn. Families who are interested in the program, but are not yet enrolled, are also invited to attend to learn more from MNVA teachers, students and parents. Details can be found at http://mnva.k12.com/.

“Minnesota Virtual Academy is a leader of educational innovation in the state,” said Krin Abraham, Head of School at MNVA. “As one of the first statewide online programs in Minnesota, MNVA has consistently provided students with the individualized approach they need in order to learn and grow to their full potential.”

In a recent K12 report, MNVA was recognized for improving its overall academic results and raising student proficiency rates in Reading and Math.

MNVA provides a rigorous and engaging curriculum, including courses in language arts/English, math, science, history, world languages, art and music, as well as elective and Advanced Placement® courses for high school students. The school also offers an advanced learner program and opportunities in STEM education, as well as the ability for students to earn college credit while in high school. Students graduate with a high school diploma that meets all state requirements.

More information on MNVA, upcoming events and how to enroll can be found online at http://mnva.k12.com/.

About Minnesota Virtual Academy

Minnesota Virtual Academy (MNVA) is an accredited, full- and part-time online public school program of Houston Public Schools that serves students in grades K through 12. As part of the Minnesota public school system, MNVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation's largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. Students use web-based lessons and hands-on instructional materials which are shipped to their homes. For more information about MNVA, visit http://mnva.k12.com.

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150311/181153LOGO

SOURCE Minnesota Virtual Academy

Top Wall Street Stories: K12, Inc. (NYSE:LRN), Office Depot, Inc. (NASDAQ:ODP), Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (NYSE:JEC), Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ:CMCSA)

Posted on June 30, 2015 by William .

.

K12, Inc. (NYSE:LRN) belongs to Services sector. Its net profit margin is 3.00% and weekly performance is -10.63%. On last trading day company shares ended up $13.20. K12, Inc. (NYSE:LRN) distance from 50-day simple moving average (SMA50) is -9.62%. On 23 June, K12, Inc. (NYSE:LRN) released a new report highlighting how a community of educators, students, and families working together to build strong relationships can drive strong academic performance at Wisconsin Virtual Academy (WIVA). WIVA is a statewide online public charter school authorized by McFarland School District, serving students in kindergarten through high school.

.

.

Ohio Virtual Academy Welcomes K-12 Students to Enroll for 2015-2016 School Year

– Tuition-free online public school offers families an alternative education option –

MAUMEE, Ohio, March 16, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Ohio Virtual Academy (OHVA), an accredited, full-time, online public community school, welcomes families with students in grades K-12 to enroll for the 2015-2016 academic year. OHVA is open to all students who reside in . By combining online instruction, hands-on curriculum and the support of -licensed teachers, OHVA cultivates an individualized education for each student.

To help parents and children learn more about the program, now in its 13th year, OHVA hosts in-person information sessions around the state each month, online information sessions, and upcoming community events in Cincinnati, Mentor and Bowling Green. Interested families are encouraged to visit the school's website for details on these upcoming events, as well as more about OHVA and how to enroll.

“The structure and support provided by Ohio Virtual Academy is helping my son significantly improve his academic performance, as well as his self-confidence,” said Dina Gast, the parent of an 8th grader at OHVA.

Students who enroll in OHVA receive an individualized education experience, designed to let them discover their own learning style. OHVA gives advanced learners the ability to progress faster in subjects in which they excel, including opportunities for advancement in STEM education.

OHVA provides a rigorous and engaging curriculum, including courses in language arts/English, math, science, history, world languages, art and music, as well as elective and Advanced Placement® courses for high school students. College or career minded students can choose from a broad range of profession-focused courses in order to gain a competitive edge for the future, discover their path after high school or explore a possible college major.

“The OHVA community is a strong support system for families who are interested in getting more involved in their children's education,” said Dr. Kristin Stewart, Head of School at Ohio Virtual Academy. “Our teachers work closely with our parents, and in addition, organize opportunities for families to come together for social and academic enrichment at museums, science centers, libraries and activity based venues.”

More information on the school, the upcoming community events, and how to apply can be found online here: www.k12.com/ohva.

About Ohio Virtual Academy



Ohio Virtual Academy (OHVA) is an accredited, full-time online public school serving students in grades K through 12. As part of the public school system, OHVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation's largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about OHVA, visit www.k12.com/ohva.

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ohio-virtual-academy-welcomes-k-12-students-to-enroll-for-2015-2016-school-year-300050899.html

SOURCE Ohio Virtual Academy

Copyright (2015) PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved

Mark Neal, superintendent of the Tri-Valley Local Schools in Ohio, wrote a sharply worded statement about parents’ right to opt their child out of testing.


 


When parents asked if they had the right to opt out, he responded with this advice:


 


While I am not (and never have been) an advocate of the PARCC Testing, Ohio got into this testing debacle with little to no input from local school officials. Therefore, I feel no responsibility to stick my neck out for the Department of Education by defending their decisions. What’s happening now, in my opinion, is that parents have figured out what is being forced upon their children, and the proverbial rubber… is beginning to meet the road. However, it is not our goal to discourage nor undermine the laws of our governing body.


 


Therefore, our position as a school district is that we do not discourage nor encourage a parent’s decision to opt out their child. We must respect parental rights at all costs. This is the very reason I advocate for local control. Our own Tri-Valley Board of Education is in a much better position to make sound decisions for the families of our school district, than are the bureaucrats in Columbus and Washington. I say that with no disrespect toward our own legislators, whom have worked diligently behind the scenes to address the over-testing issue. The unfortunate reality is that the parents who have contacted the school district up to this point, are the parents of high achieving students who undoubtedly would do well on these assessments. We will effectively be rating school districts and individual teachers based on test scores that do not include many of their highest achieving students….


 


I am quite confident that reason will ultimately prevail. In the meantime, we will respect the rights of our parents to make the best decisions for their children while simultaneously following the laws and policies of the Ohio Department of Education.


 


For defending common sense and speaking plainly to his community, I place Mark Neal on the honor roll of the blog as a champion of American public education.
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1FAsDtS

The weekly report on testing from Bob Schaeffer of Fairtest:


FairTest provides these weekly summaries of news clips and other resources as a tool to build the national assessment reform movement. We encourage parents, educators, students, administrators, community organizers, researchers and other allies to draw on the positive initiatives described in these links as models for their own local campaigns.


If you have similar materials to share, please send them to us for possible inclusion in future editions.


Some States Rush to Tie Common Core Tests to Graduation


http://ift.tt/1slIP89


California Rethinks How to Report Test Scores


http://ift.tt/1qAogZY


Colorado Legislators Express Bipartisan Skepticism About Testing at Pre-Session Hearing


http://ift.tt/1slIP8a


Connecticut Working to De-emphasize Testing in School Accountability


http://ift.tt/1qAoeBm


Florida School Boards Association Takes a Stand Against Over Testing


http://ift.tt/1yeKbDu


Text of Florida School Boards Resolution


http://ift.tt/1slIQZI


Opposition Grows to Illinois’ Use of PARCC Common Core Test


http://ift.tt/1yOVeam


Louisiana Political Struggle Over PARRC Testing Continues


http://ift.tt/1G90upL


How Massachusetts Teachers Defeated a Test-Based Evaluation Plan


http://ift.tt/1ERxGl8


New Jersey Parents, Teachers Talk About Opting Out of PARCC Test


http://ift.tt/1qAoeRH


Mom Dares New Jersey Gov. Christie to Defend Common Core Exam After Taking It


http://ift.tt/1yLOLxc


Judging New York’s Education Chancellor By Her Own “Standards”


http://ift.tt/1qAohgo


Ohio’s Harmful Obsession with School Testing


http://ift.tt/1z8onxf


PTA in Oklahoma Calls for End to High-Stakes Testing


http://ift.tt/1slIPoy


Oklahoma PTA Resolutions on Testing


http://ift.tt/1qAoeRK


Dallas, Texas, School Board Responds to Parents Call for Less Focus on Testing


http://ift.tt/1zT8A3D


What Might a Republican Rewrite of “No Child Left Behind” Look Like?


http://ift.tt/1qAohgp


Duncan’s Hammer: Test Scores


http://ift.tt/1slIQZM


National Secondary School Principals Group Criticizes Value-Added Measurement


http://ift.tt/1wEvWfN


First Step to Close Test Score Gap: Reduce Poverty and Segregation


http://ift.tt/1slIRg0


To Fix School Problems: Listen to Experienced Education Experts


http://ift.tt/1qAohgs


Standardized Testing a False Solution to Attacking Educational Racism


http://ift.tt/1slIRg3


Beware of Another Standardized Test: This One on Civics


http://ift.tt/1G4XWL3


Corruption and Cheating Increase with Imposition of School “Accountability” Schemes Says Finnish Expert


http://ift.tt/1pYAE5G


The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed with Standardized Testing — forthcoming book available for pre-order now


http://ift.tt/1slIPoH


Bob Schaeffer, Public Education Director

FairTest: National Center for Fair & Open Testing

office- (239) 395-6773 fax- (239) 395-6779

mobile- (239) 699-0468

web- http://www.fairtest.org
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1qAoeBj

Agora Cyber Charter School Celebrates 5th Annual National Honor Society Induction – MarketWatch

Agora Cyber Charter School Celebrates 5th Annual National Honor Society Induction

Published:

Statewide Pennsylvania Online School First of its Kind to Charter NHS Chapter

Created with Highstock 2.0.1Time (EDT)K12 Inc.10:0011:0012:001:002:003:00

WAYNE, Pa., Oct. 28, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Agora Cyber Charter School, an accredited, online public charter school for Pennsylvania students in grades K-12, accepted 50 new members to its National Honor Society (NHS) and National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) chapters this month. A ceremony was held in Mechanicsburg, PA on October 5, 2014. In 2010, Agora became the first cyber school in the nation to charter an NHS chapter. Membership has grown from 17 original students to almost 100 active members for the 2014-2015 school year.

All students are required to maintain a 3.5 GPA to receive an invitation to apply. Acceptance is based on a written application which clearly demonstrates a strong dedication to community service, excellent leadership skills, and a solid ethical foundation.

As active members of Agora's NHS and NJHS chapters, students attend monthly meetings and commit to serving 40 hours of community service on a local and national level. Over the past 4 years, the Agora chapters have partnered with the Make a Wish Foundation, Big Brothers & Big Sisters Program, Habitat for Humanity, Holiday Card for Heroes, local children's hospitals, and several local food banks across the state.

Samantha Medasie, Agora 11th grader and secretary of the school's NHS chapter, spoke about philanthropy and service at this year's induction ceremony, where her younger brother was inducted into the NJHS chapter.

“I love having this opportunity to connect with other students at Agora who are as motivated and as goal-oriented as I am,” Medasie said. “This year, my goal is to get the entire NHS chapter involved in our community service projects.”

During the upcoming school year, Agora aims to challenge its NHS and NJHS students to step out of their comfort zones and employ their leadership skills to make an impact on a local, national and even global level. As part of its school-wide service learning campaign, Agora has partnered with the Pencils of Promise organization to help make a positive impact on children's education around the world. This year, Agora's NHS and NJHS chapters will focus on raising funds and awareness to help Pencils of Promise build a fully-functioning school for students who have the passion to learn but lack the resources needed to achieve their aspirations.

Through the individualized online K12 curriculum and support from state-certified teachers, Agora provides core courses in Language Arts, Math, Science, History, Music, Art and Physical Education. The high school program includes a foreign language course and access to AP courses. Students can also choose to participate in a variety of extracurricular groups and clubs through Agora, as well as participate in their school district's extracurricular activities.

“Our fifth annual induction of new students into the Agora chapter of the National Honor Society is a testament to the academic commitment and strength of our school community,” said Susan Siever, Head of School at Agora Cyber Charter School. “We value this opportunity to celebrate our students who consistently demonstrate leadership in the classroom and in their daily lives.”

Enrollment is still open for the 2014-2015 academic school year, and all interested families are encouraged to visit www.K12.com/Agora for more information, including details on upcoming community events and information sessions.

About Agora Cyber Charter SchoolAgora Cyber Charter School (Agora) is a full-time, state-accredited, public cyber school serving Pennsylvania students in grades K through 12. As a public cyber school, Agora is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. LRN, +0.66% the nation's largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about Agora, visit www.K12.com/Agora.

SOURCE Agora Cyber Charter School

Copyright (C) 2014 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

Tom Scarice, the superintendent of the Madison, Connecticut, public schools, writes that the campaign for the Common Core has been waged with fear tactics, mainly the fear that other nations have higher scores and will therefore “beat” us. But, he points out, citing the work of Yong Zhao, there is no connection between test scores and economic growth.


He concludes:


“Reducing the debate of the common core to a matter of implementation is intellectually weak. A number of other matters remain unresolved. The standards were never field tested with actual students. They have been largely influenced through massive donations via powerful philanthropic organizations such as the Gates Foundation, creating a chilling question about the consequential influence of one billionaire on our education system. Questions about whether or not the standards are appropriate for our youngest and most fragile learners have been raised by over 500 nationally recognized early childhood experts, and special education organizations. Categorically, no evidence exists to support the stance that the common core will raise the achievement of our most impoverished students, which is the most pressing challenge facing Connecticut. Education is much too complex to reduce our work to another futile silver bullet.


“Connecticut has had academic standards for decades. Academic standards, developed by education professionals, are largely embraced by educators. They serve to set clear expectations for the accountability of learning and form the basis of curriculum. However, the rigidity of the common core, mandating that each and every student achieve the same learning progressions, regardless of learning style, and individual learning profile, at the exact same rate, contribute to the epidemic of standardization and homogenization that has afflicted our schools for the past decade. This is particularly concerning when the global marketplace and the demands of citizenship in this era clearly necessitate an individual’s diversity of thought and skills.


“All that said, even within the broken testing and evaluation systems suffocating our schools, there are many individual standards within the common core that are worthy of academic pursuit. Districts would be best served to approach the common core with thoughtful analysis of the potential efficacy and appropriateness of each individual standard as they integrate them into curriculum. Plausible rejection of individual standards by local professional educators must be shared transparently with Boards of Education and the local community, backed up with appropriate justification. As always, healthy skepticism and deep analysis serve systems well. Every state and every district has multiple indicators of student success. What would local accountability look like beyond one tightly coupled measure to the common core? Is student success defined by performance on the SBAC, and if not, will local districts have the fortitude to move beyond the narrow, inadequate comparisons that are provided by standardized assessments?There is more to the story of student success beyond the implementation of the common core.”
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1AjpBmS