Form 4 K12 INC For: Aug 24 Filed by: Rhyu James Jeaho

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FORM
4
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP

Filed pursuant to Section 16(a) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934

or Section 30(h) of the Investment Company Act of
1940

OMB APPROVAL
OMB Number: 3235-0287
Expires: December 31, 2014
Estimated average burden
hours per response: 0.5
  
Check this box if no longer subject to Section 16. Form 4 or Form 5
obligations may continue.
See

Instruction 1(b).


1. Name and Address of Reporting Person
*

Rhyu James Jeaho
(Last) (First) (Middle)
2300 CORPORATE PARK DRIVE

(Street)

HERNDON VA 20171
(City) (State) (Zip)

2. Issuer Name
and
Ticker or Trading Symbol
K12 INC
[
LRN
]
5. Relationship of Reporting Person(s) to Issuer
(Check all applicable)

Director 10% Owner
X Officer (give title below) Other (specify below)
EVP & Chief Financial Officer
3. Date of Earliest Transaction
(Month/Day/Year)
08/24/2016
4. If Amendment, Date of Original Filed
(Month/Day/Year)
6. Individual or Joint/Group Filing (Check
Applicable Line)

X Form filed by One Reporting Person
Form filed by More than One Reporting
Person
Table I – Non-Derivative Securities Acquired, Disposed of, or
Beneficially Owned
1.
Title of Security (Instr.
3)
2.
Transaction Date
(Month/Day/Year)
2A.
Deemed Execution Date, if any
(Month/Day/Year)
3.
Transaction Code (Instr.
8)
4.
Securities Acquired (A) or Disposed Of (D) (Instr.
3, 4 and 5)
5.
Amount of Securities Beneficially Owned Following Reported
Transaction(s) (Instr.
3 and 4)
6.
Ownership Form: Direct (D) or Indirect (I) (Instr.
4)
7.
Nature of Indirect Beneficial Ownership (Instr.
4)
Code V Amount (A) or (D) Price

Common Stock
08/24/2016
 
A
(1)

 

80,000

A
$

0


305,747

D

 
Table II – Derivative Securities Acquired, Disposed of, or Beneficially Owned
(e.g., puts, calls, warrants, options, convertible securities)
1. Title of Derivative Security (Instr.
3)
2. Conversion or Exercise Price of Derivative Security 3. Transaction Date
(Month/Day/Year)
3A. Deemed Execution Date, if any
(Month/Day/Year)
4. Transaction Code (Instr.
8)
5.
Number of Derivative Securities Acquired (A) or Disposed of (D) (Instr.
3, 4 and 5)
6. Date Exercisable and Expiration Date
(Month/Day/Year)
7. Title and Amount of Securities Underlying Derivative Security (Instr.
3 and 4)
8. Price of Derivative Security (Instr.
5)
9.
Number of derivative Securities Beneficially Owned Following Reported Transaction(s) (Instr.
4)
10. Ownership Form: Direct (D) or Indirect (I) (Instr.
4)
11. Nature of Indirect Beneficial Ownership (Instr.
4)
Code V (A) (D) Date Exercisable Expiration Date Title Amount or Number of Shares
Explanation of Responses:
1. These shares are restricted and will vest as follows: 80% vest semi-annually, with 20% vesting in the first year and 40% vesting in each of the next two years following the grant date. The remaining 20% will only begin vesting upon the achievement of a performance objective. Upon certification of the extent to which the performance objective was achieved, the shares will vest as follows: 20% will vest immediately and 40% will vest semi-annually in each of the following two years.
/s/ John C. Grothaus, attorney-in-fact 08/26/2016
** Signature of Reporting Person Date
Reminder: Report on a separate line for each class of securities beneficially owned directly or indirectly.
* If the form is filed by more than one reporting person,
see

Instruction
4

(b)(v).

** Intentional misstatements or omissions of facts constitute Federal Criminal Violations
See

18 U.S.C. 1001 and 15 U.S.C. 78ff(a).

Note: File three copies of this Form, one of which must be manually signed. If space is insufficient,
see

Instruction 6 for procedure.

Persons who respond to the collection of information contained in this form are not required to respond unless the form displays a currently valid OMB Number.

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K12 education company settles case with Calif.

Local Education

By Ty Tagami


The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Updated: 5:08 p.m. Thursday, July 28, 2016Posted: 2:47 p.m. Thursday, July 28, 2016

A company that is paid tens of millions of dollars to provide educational services in Georgia has settled a legal case in California after a state investigation into allegations of improper billing there.

There’ve been no public allegations of impropriety in Georgia, where the company, K12 helps operate Georgia Cyber Academy. The academy has come in for criticism over student results: in 2015, the school earned a D for its academic performance with more than 13,000 Georgia students, as reported by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The Georgia academy is among the five biggest schools managed by K12, officials said. The company educates about as many students at a collection of 14 schools in California called the California Virtual Academies, or CAVA.

K12 was the target of a civil investigation by California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris, whose office alleged that K12 exploited weak charter school oversight in her state to excessively bill CAVA schools by pressuring teachers to sign “doctored” attendance records. Her office also accused the school of telling people it thought were prospective parents that classes were smaller than they really were.

On July 8, K12 agreed to settle for millions of dollars, without admitting to the alleged facts or to wrongdoing. Harris issued a statement saying the company had agreed to a settlement of $168.5 million, which K12 CEO Stuart Udell characterized as “shameless and categorically incorrect” in a conference call afterward with financial analysts.

The company did agree to pay $2.5 million to the state and $6 million to the attorney general’s office. But K12 objects to the way Harris described the other $160 million.

She called it “debt relief to the non-profit schools it manages.” Udell called it “the difference between K12’s contractual price and what the schools can afford to pay” based on their state funding.

“While K12 has a contractual right to recover these balanced budget credits, in all the years that K12 has worked with the CAVA boards we have never sought to recover those amounts,” Udell said on that conference call, according to a transcript provided by K12.

The final judgment in the case describes the $160 million agreement this way: an expungement of a decade’s worth of “credits against amounts otherwise due under managed school contracts.”

Neither the conference call nor the attorney general’s news release addressed another payment: $80,000 to a former CAVA teacher turned whistleblower. She alleged she was fired because she complained about the way K12 changed the attendance records she had submitted. The attorney general intervened in her case and K12 agreed to give her $50,000 to settle her employment-related claims and $30,000 for her legal fees.

Udell told the analysts that the company settled with the attorney general to avoid a “multiyear distraction” and litigation costs that would have been many times what it agreed to pay. He also said the company plans to fight legislation in California that would prohibit charter schools from using for-profit companies like his. And he said K12, which runs some 80 schools in 33 states, has plans to expand, going statewide in Alabama and Virginia and adding schools in other states, including Indiana, Michigan, Nevada and Maine.

K12 education company settles case with Calif.

5:08 p.m. Thursday, July 28, 2016

| Filed in: Education


Comments
0



A company that is paid tens of millions of dollars to provide educational services in Georgia has settled a legal case in California after a state investigation into allegations of improper billing there.

There’ve been no public allegations of impropriety in Georgia, where the company, K12 helps operate Georgia Cyber Academy. The academy has come in for criticism over student results: in 2015, the school earned a D for its academic performance with more than 13,000 Georgia students, as reported by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The Georgia academy is among the five biggest schools managed by K12, officials said. The company educates about as many students at a collection of 14 schools in California called the California Virtual Academies, or CAVA.

John Amis

Graduate of Georgia Cyber Academy Brycen Walker of Savannah throws up his hands in jubilation as he follows Tyriq Wade of Columbus to the stage during commencement, Saturday, May 21, 2016, held at Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta. The statewide charter school educates more than 13,000 students a year, as young as 5 years old, all online and at about half the cost of traditional public schools. (Photo/John Amis)

K12 was the target of a civil investigation by California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris, whose office alleged that K12 exploited weak charter school oversight in her state to excessively bill CAVA schools by pressuring teachers to sign “doctored” attendance records. Her office also accused the school of telling people it thought were prospective parents that classes were smaller than they really were.

On July 8, K12 agreed to settle for millions of dollars, without admitting to the alleged facts or to wrongdoing. Harris issued a statement saying the company had agreed to a settlement of $168.5 million, which K12 CEO Stuart Udell characterized as “shameless and categorically incorrect” in a conference call afterward with financial analysts.

The company did agree to pay $2.5 million to the state and $6 million to the attorney general’s office. But K12 objects to the way Harris described the other $160 million.

She called it “debt relief to the non-profit schools it manages.” Udell called it “the difference between K12’s contractual price and what the schools can afford to pay” based on their state funding.

“While K12 has a contractual right to recover these balanced budget credits, in all the years that K12 has worked with the CAVA boards we have never sought to recover those amounts,” Udell said on that conference call, according to a transcript provided by K12.

The final judgment in the case describes the $160 million agreement this way: an expungement of a decade’s worth of “credits against amounts otherwise due under managed school contracts.”

Neither the conference call nor the attorney general’s news release addressed another payment: $80,000 to a former CAVA teacher turned whistleblower. She alleged she was fired because she complained about the way K12 changed the attendance records she had submitted. The attorney general intervened in her case and K12 agreed to give her $50,000 to settle her employment-related claims and $30,000 for her legal fees.

Udell told the analysts that the company settled with the attorney general to avoid a “multiyear distraction” and litigation costs that would have been many times what it agreed to pay. He also said the company plans to fight legislation in California that would prohibit charter schools from using for-profit companies like his. And he said K12, which runs some 80 schools in 33 states, has plans to expand, going statewide in Alabama and Virginia and adding schools in other states, including Indiana, Michigan, Nevada and Maine.

Georgia’s largest online school paid millions, earns a D

Local Education

By Ty Tagami


The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Updated: 3:04 p.m. Friday, July 22, 2016Posted: 12:00 a.m. Saturday, July 23, 2016

Georgians spend tens of millions of dollars a year on one of the biggest online schools in the nation, yet nearly every measure indicates the high-tech, online education model has not worked for many of its more than 13,000 students.

Georgia Cyber Academy students log onto online classes from home, where they talk to and message with teachers and classmates and do assignments in a way that will “individualize their education, maximizing their ability to succeed,” according to an advertisement. But results show that most of them lag state performance on everything from standardized test scores to graduation rates.

The charter school’s leaders say they face unique challenges, with large numbers of students already behind when they enroll. They have plans to improve results but also claim the state’s grading methods are unfair and inaccurate. However, the state disagrees, and if the academy cannot show improvement soon, the commission that chartered the school could shut it down.

Since it opened with a couple thousand students in 2007, the academy has grown to become the state’s largest public school, with students from all 159 counties. In the 2015 fiscal year alone, it reported receiving $82 million in state and federal funding.

Parents such as Dione Ansah praise the academy as an attractive alternative to regular schools. The DeKalb County resident chose it for her two daughters after she lost her job and could no longer afford private school. The neighborhood middle school had a reputation for violence, she said, adding, “there was no way I was going to send my kids there.”

Families choose the academy for a variety of other reasons, such as a desire to learn at an individual pace, a medical condition that keeps kids at home or a need for a flexible schedule for work, such as a student with a budding acting career.

Evelyn Bailey, who graduated in May and will attend an Ivy League university this fall, said she was exposed to a diverse group of students through the classes and occasional organized field trips. Bailey thrived while attending class and doing homework on a computer screen in a windowless corner of her Douglasville basement.

“You have to be the kind of student that enjoys having more responsibility,” said Bailey, 18. “You have to be good at managing your time.”

Too few students apparently share her drive and temperament. The academy earned a “D” for 2015 from the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement. The academy scored near the bottom in the state that year for “growth,” a measure of how each student did on standardized state tests compared to others with similar past performance.

The graduation rate of 66 percent lagged behind the state average by 13 percentage points. Reading ability in third grade, a key marker of future academic success, also lagged, with 47 percent of its students able to digest books on their grade level versus a state average of 52 percent.

The State Charter Schools Commission, established in 2013 as an alternative to going through a school district to start a charter school, authorized the academy in 2014-15. The commission requires its schools to meet annual academic, financial and operational goals in three of the first four years of operation. The academy, which had operated for seven years under the Odyssey Charter School in Coweta County before obtaining its own charter, did not perform as required in its first year as an independent school. It scored one out of a possible 100 points on the academic portion of its evaluation, which assesses performance, mainly on standardized tests, compared to traditional schools. The results for 2015-16 are still being calculated.

This scoring system was not in place when the academy board signed the charter, and the school has not yet agreed to use it. But Bonnie Holliday, the commission’s executive director, said the school isn’t meeting goals under the original scoring system either.

“In the event standards are not met in future years,” she said, “the school is at risk for non-renewal in 2019.”

The academy is beset by many of the same problems that bedevil traditional public schools, including a high and rising number of students from families with meager incomes. Sixty nine percent of the academy’s students in 2015-16 were considered low-income under the federal school meal program; that’s 7 percentage points higher than the state average but below some metro Atlanta districts.

The school also grapples with high turnover. One in four academy students leaves each year; and about a third of the students are new in any given year, said Matt Arkin, the school’s founding head. It takes a year or more to adapt to a classroom on the computer, he said, adding that the performance looks better when counting only those who’ve been there for several years. For instance, for the 42 percent of students who start and finish high school there, the graduation rate is 85 percent. That is 19 percentage points higher than the school’s overall rate.

Some parents and teachers say large class sizes make it difficult for teachers to deliver on the school’s premise of harnessing technology to tailor teaching to each child.

“That’s all a lie; maybe in the younger years, as long as the teacher doesn’t have 70 kids,” said Sherry Horton. Her son did fine there, but her two daughters struggled in high school and couldn’t get their teachers’ attention, Horton said. She withdrew them. “If you put your kids in that school, know that you need to be on top of it every day with the teachers,” she said.

Arkin said class sizes are larger than he’d like, averaging 50 students. He said staffing is limited by tax money the school gets: more than $5,000 per student versus about $9,000 on average for Georgia schools.

As a state charter school, the academy gets no local property tax dollars. And the commission gives it less money per student than its other charter schools with school buildings to maintain, buses to fuel and lunches to cook.

Another problem mentioned by former teachers: attendance.

Jennifer Phillips, who taught seventhgrade English at the Academy several years ago, said a small proportion of her students showed up regularly for her online classes.

“Attendance was definitely a problem,” said Phillips, who left after one year, disillusioned.

Students can watch recordings of the classes later.

Some also said students whose parents weren’t monitoring them could misbehave and be disruptive, doodling on a PowerPoint slide projected to the whole class instead of demonstrating how to solve the math problem on it.

Others said disciplinary problems were minor compared to brick-and-mortar schools. Kelly Brooks, a current teacher at the academy, left a traditional middle school job after tiring of misbehavior. “Boys and girls at that age, they’re just so distracted by each other,” she said. Now, when kids misbehave, she can turn off their ability to speak to or send messages to their classmates.

She said there are other advantages with the technology. Students feel emboldened to approach her because they can send her what they might think are dumb questions without embarrassing themselves in front of their peers.

“So as long as a student is interested, they’re going to get way more out of this than in a traditional classroom,” she said.

While some students exploit that opportunity, the school’s overall performance suggests most are like Keontavious Hankerson, a Burke County student who liked his teachers but felt uninspired by the online experience.

His mother, Mary Webb, enrolled him in the academy two years ago after county teachers “gave him real bad grades because he couldn’t focus.” His performance improved the first year, when his father’s work schedule allowed him to stay home during the day and push him. The next year his father’s schedule changed, and Keontavious was left home with only a slightly older relative. He floundered, Webb said. She was impressed that the school provided a computer, books and even printer ink, but said she will re-enroll him in the county this fall.

Keontavious, 15, said he missed being around other kids. “I didn’t like being at home,” he said. “It was hard for me to stay on the computer.”

School officials acknowledge the problem: Self-driven students or those with parents who can push them tend to do best while those with less support often struggle.

“We’re a school that really seeks to challenge high performers, and push them to new heights. At the same time we’re a dropout prevention and dropout recovery school,” Arkin said.

About four in five at the high school level and about half of the younger kids came to the academy after falling behind at their prior school, he said.

The school pays K12, a for-profit company, to provide technology and curriculum services, including $36.9 million in 2014-15.

Mary Gifford, a senior vice president at K12, said Georgia’s growth measure is inaccurate at grading schools with extremes of high- and low-performers and high student turnover.

The state disagrees, saying their school grading model uses test scores in a way that is “reflective” of those characteristics.

Ryan Mahoney, chairman of the academy’s nonprofit board, dismissed the likelihood of being closed. The first year’s results were based mainly on the 2015 Georgia Milestones tests, which, he noted, were waived for low-performing traditional schools since the tests were new. If the commission sticks to its rules, he said, most of the agency’s 15 schools that were around in 2014-15 would have to close.

“I’m sure that’s not what the commission intended,” he said. He wants the commission to change the way it grades schools. He also wants more money for the school.

Holliday, the commission’s executive director, said schools might get a reprieve if they meet standards by the fourth year of their contract, but added any underperforming school is at risk of closure “regardless of whether it’s one school or 10 schools … any school operating under the assumption that commissioners will give them a pass for poor performance is mistaken.”

Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle, who spoke at the academy’s graduation ceremony, is optimistic about the school, but said it must make do with current funding.

“They have a very efficient model for the delivery of education, and they should be maximizing that,” he said. “K12 as an institution needs to be less concerned about money and more concerned about student achievement.”

He said charter schools like the academy prod traditional schools to improve and that it has the potential to be a “disruptive” force for education in the way Uber is changing transportation. While the academy “clearly is not at the highest standard that we would like,” he said, it is serving “many students at a very, very high level.”

Online charter schools have drawn critical attention nationwide, even from charter advocates. In mid-June, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools called for change, citing research that found online charter schools had turned in “large-scale underperformance.”

Karega Rausch, vice president of research for the National Association of Charter School Authorizers, which helped with the report, said virtual schools in Georgia and across the country are doing poorly on a host of measures. “There’s a whole lot of corroborating evidence to suggest there’s a problem,” he said. “A lot more authorizers need to close a lot more virtual schools. Period.”

Arkin said his turnaround plan includes more advisers to help new students adapt and a new data system in middle school to help teachers analyze student performance and adjust their teaching. And he said the school is getting better, noting that some of its scores on the state’s report card climbed closer to the state average in 2014-15 from the year before, when the academy operated under Odyssey.

Even parents who are critical said it would be a shame if the academy closed, since it provides an alternative in some parts of the state where there is no other.

Susan Rachel’s daughter spent a year in the academy. Now, Rachel, from the Augusta area, is complaining about class sizes, harried teachers, students slipping profanity onto the electronic blackboard and, ultimately, a model of education that didn’t seem to be all that different from traditional public school. She described it as “the factory model in your living room, spitting out kids as fast as you can enroll them.”

But don’t close the academy, she said. Parents need an alternative: “I mean, it’s better than nothing.”

Data specialist Jennifer Peebles contributed to this article

Thank you, Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, for writing a bill to ban for-profit operators of virtual schools.

The bill, Assembly Bill 1084, “would prevent charter schools that do more than 80 percent of their teaching online from being operated by for-profit companies or hiring them to facilitate instruction. If passed and signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown, the legislation would effectively put companies like K12 out of business in the Golden State.

“Our taxpayer dollars should be spent in the classroom to help our students, not used to enrich a company’s shareholders or drive up its profits,” Bonilla said in an interview.

But K12 spokesman Mike Kraft railed against the proposal, calling it “another cynical effort to take away the rights of parents to choose the way their kids are educated.”

How cynical are those “special interests” who want to take away K12 Inc.’s ability to profit while providing inferior education!?

That company is K12 Inc., a publicly traded Virginia firm that allows students who spend as little as one minute during a school day logged onto its software to be counted as “present,” as it reaps tens of millions of dollars annually in state funding while graduating fewer than half of its high school students. Students who live almost anywhere south of Humboldt County may sign up for one of the company’s schools.

Assemblywoman Bonilla was acting in response to a brilliant series of articles by Jessica Calefati in the San Jose Mercury News, exposing the profitable but educationally bankrupt K12 Inc., the corporation founded by the Milken brothers and publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange.

I hope Assemblywoman Bonilla and the media will review the abundant research on K12 Inc, such as the Credo study or the NEPC study. What she will learn is that students in online charter schools lose ground and fall behind their peers in real schools.

If California chooses to waste millions of taxpayer dollars on bad schools to enrich the stockholders and the Milken family, shame on the legislators and the governor.

via Diane Ravitch’s blog

http://ift.tt/1UowL7f

Bay Area Lawmakers Call for Financial Audit of K12 Inc.

Jun 6, 2016

CHARTER A COURSE TO CONFLICT: A group of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle is calling for a state probe into California Virtual Schools, a network of online charter schools operated by K12 Inc, after a two-part San Jose Mercury News investigation (Part 1Part 2). The Mercury New reports that Representatives Phil Ting, D-San Francisco, and Catharine Baker, R-San Ramon, will be collaborating on a bill to remedy K12 Inc’s reported wrongdoings.

The Mercury News’ investigation found that “[K12] reaps tens of millions of dollars in state funding while graduating fewer than half of the students enrolled in its high schools” and that “teachers at K12’s California Virtual Academies have been asked to inflate attendance and enrollment records used to determine how much state funding the schools receive.”

K12 Inc responded to the original investigation with a statement reprinted by the newspaper. The online charter provider said that the paper’s claims closely mirrored those of the California Teachers’ Association.

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Jessica Calefati of the San Jose Mercury-News wrote a shocking series about the online charter schools of K12 Inc., which have the lowest graduation rate in the state, and which counts students “present” if they log on for only one minute.

Millions of public dollars fund the California Virtual Academies (CAVA), which operates for profit and is listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The company, founded by Michael and Lowell Milken, delivers a substandard education. It should be closely supervised or shut down.

Unfortunately, as Calefati discovered, the legislature is moving at a snail’s pace to authorize an audit of CAVA. Nothing seems to be happening. Much clucking of tongues, but no action.

CAVA is the lowest performing school in the state. Why hasn’t it been shut down long ago? If you recall, K12’s online charter in Tennessee was the lowest performing school in the state, and not even the State Commissioner Kevin Huffman was able to get it closed. Why?

Governor Brown likes charters. When he was mayor of Oakland, he opened two charters. The legislature has been unwilling to stand up to the rich and powerful California Charter Schools Association. CCSA should be demanding close scrutiny of CAVA, whose tactics embarrasses all charter schools. Their silence is deafening.

When the legislature dared to pass a bill banning for-profit charters, Governor Brown vetoed it. He also vetoed a bill to require charter schools to ban conflicts of interest.

So California has a greedy, rapacious charter industry, whose growth will continue unchecked until public schools enroll only students the charters don’t want. Fraud, waste, and abuse in the charter industry will grow without oversight. Conflicts of interest and nepotism will proliferate. Charters will continue to be run by entrepreneurs and speculators.

Does anyone think these developments are “reform”? From a distance, they look like graft and corruption.

via Diane Ravitch’s blog

http://ift.tt/25EPCSG

Home » Analyst Views » K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) Costs Of Goods Sold Stands At $607.756 Millions

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) Costs Of Goods Sold Stands At $607.756 Millions

on May 28, 2016

For the fiscal ended 2015-06-30, K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) comprehensive income was $-1.065 millions and for the quarter ended 2015-06-30, it was $-1.065 millions.

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) posted $9.326 millions on net loss/income for the fiscal closed 2015-06-30. For the quarter ended 2015-06-30, it came at $9.326 millions.

Cost of goods sold

For the year ended 2015-06-30, K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) costs of goods sold was $607.756 millions. This figure came at $607.756 for the quarter ended 2015-06-30.

The cost of goods sold is posted on the income statement and is stated as cost of the accounting period. By comparing the revenues from the goods sold and cost of the goods sold, the matching concept of accounting is achieved. Also, cost of goods sold deducted from the sales revenues represents gross profit. By adjusting the cost of the goods manufactured or purchased by the change in record of finished goods gives cost of goods sold.

Deferred revenue

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) current deferred revenue was $24.927 millions, for the year ending on 2015-06-30. It was $24.927 millions for the quarter closed 2015-06-30.

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) posted $7.692 millions for the fiscal ended 2015-06-30, which was $7.692 millions for the quarter closed 2015-06-30.

EBIT and EBIT margins

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) EBIT for the year ended 2015-06-30 and quarter 2015-06-30 came at $18.4271 millions and $18.4271 millions, respectively.

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) announced EBIT margin of 18.4271% and 18.4271% for the year ended 2015-06-30 and quarter ended 2015-06-30, respectively.

EBIT is a measure of a firm’s earning capacity from ongoing businesses, equal to earnings before subtraction of income taxes and interest. It excludes expenditure and income from unusual, discontinued or non-recurring activities. In event of a firm with minimal amortization activities and depreciation, EBIT is tracked closely by creditors, because it indicates the amount of funds that such a firm will be able to deploy to pay off creditors, also termed operating profit.

EBITDA and EBITDA margins

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) reported EBITDA of $18.4271 millions for the year closed 2015-06-30. EBITDA for the quarter closed 2015-06-30 was 18.4271 millions. For the fiscal ended 2015-06-30 EBITDA margin was 18.4271%

Book value

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) book value for the fiscal ended 2015-06-30 was $14.0065. The book value was $14.0065 for the quarter ended 2015-06-30.

Common shares count

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) common shares for the fiscal closing 2015-06-30 was 38.335. For the quarter ended 2015-06-30, there were 38.335 common shares outstanding.

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K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) Comprehensive Income At $-1.065 For Period Ended 2015-06-30

For the year ended 2015-06-30, K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN)comprehensive income was $-1.065 millions while for the quarter ended 2015-06-30, it was $-1.065 millions.

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) posted $9.326 millions on consolidated net income/loss for the year ended 2015-06-30. For the quarter ended 2015-06-30, it came at $9.326 millions.

Cost of goods sold

For the year ended 2015-06-30, K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) spent $607.756 millions as the costs of goods sold, which stood at $607.756 millions for the quarter ended 2015-06-30. Cost of goods sold are the direct costs related to the production of the products sold by a firm. This includes the materials costs used in manufacturing the good in addition to the direct labor costs deployed to manufacture the good. It discounts indirect expenses including sales force costs and distribution costs. Cost of goods sold comes on the income statement and it can be reduced from revenue to compute a company’s gross margin. It is also known as “cost of sales.”

Deferred revenue

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) concluded the year ended 2015-06-30 with current deferred revenue of $24.927 millions, which amounted to $24.927 millions for the quarter ended 2015-06-30.

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) reported $7.692 millions for the year ended 2015-06-30. This figure for the quarter ended 2015-06-30 was $7.692 millions.

EBIT and EBIT margins

For the year ended 2015-06-30 and quarter 2015-06-30, K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) reported EBIT of $18.4271 millions and $18.4271 millions, respectively.

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) posted EBIT margin of 18.4271% and 18.4271% for the year ended 2015-06-30 and quarter ended 2015-06-30, respectively.

EBIT measures the profitability of a firm without considering its tax implications or cost of capital. It helps reduce these two variables that can vary from firm to firm, and allows one to evaluate operating profitability as a particular measure of performance. This analysis is mainly important when assessing similar firms across a single industry. EBIT margin is a computation of a firm’s profit which is computed as EBIT divided by net revenue.

EBITDA and EBITDA margins

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) reported EBITDA of $18.4271 millions for the year ended 2015-06-30. EBITDA for the quarter ended 2015-06-30 was 18.4271 millions. For the year ended 2015-06-30 EBITDA margin came at 18.4271%

Book value

Book-value per share for K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) for the year ended 2015-06-30 was $14.0065. For the quarter ended 2015-06-30, the book value was $14.0065.

Common shares count

Common shares count at the end of the year ended 2015-06-30 was 38.335. For the quarter ended 2015-06-30, there were 38.335 common shares outstanding.

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) $195.852 In Cash And Short-Term Investments As On 2015–0-6-30

By Stocks Daily StaffApril 14, 2016

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) reported accounts payable of $29.819 millions for the annual period ended 2015–0-6-30. The accounts payable for the quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 was $29.819 millions.

The change in accounts payable of K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) at the end of the annual period ended 2015–0-6-30 was $-1.192 millions. For the quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 change in accounts payable stood at $-1.192 millions.

The current Deferred tax assets for the fiscal year 2015–0-6-30 stood at $8.989 millions. While for the quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 the current Deferred tax assets was $8.989 millions.

The change in assets and liabilities for the fiscal year ended 2015–0-6-30 stood at -5.909 millions. And the change during the quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 stood at $-5.909 millions.

Days sales in receivables ie., the average number of days it takes to collect outstanding receiveable amounts from customers for the fiscal year ended 2015–0-6-30 was 72.4562. While for the quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 it stood at 72.4562.

The change in the accounts receivables for the annual and quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 and 2015–0-6-30 was $-1.892 millions and $-1.892 millions respectively.

The change in inventory for the fiscal year ended 2015–0-6-30 was $2.853 millions, while for the quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 it stood at $2.853 millions.

The current portion of the outstanding debt for the fiscal year ended 2015–0-6-30 is 1.5 millions. And the outstanding debt for quarter ended 2015–0-6-30 is $1.5 millions.