K12 Inc. Not Happy With Report on Virtual School Failings

Posted

By David Safier

on Fri, Jun 17, 2016 at 11:00 AM

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  • Courtesy of PhotoSpin

K12 Inc. was quick to respond to the report put out by a few charter school organizations saying virtual schools should be better regulated,

which I posted about yesterday. Unfair! the press release complained. Based on old data! We’ve changed our ways!

Well, not so much. The publicly traded corporation is still using the for-profit model, which includes the dictum, grow or die, as well as the necessity of putting stockholders’ interests over the needs of its students. It has an incredible churn rate; about a third of the students leave every year. That means it needs to use every means possible to replace those students and add more. Its recruiters use the kinds of high power, coercive sales techniques which have gotten for-profit colleges in trouble, luring in students who are unsuited to online schooling where personal motivation and parental involvement are keys to success.

Online education can be a valuable addition to classroom learning, and for a small slice of the student population it can be a substitute for brick-and-mortar schooling, but it fails when it’s sold as a mass education model. K12 Inc. ends its press release by saying, “We are a company of educators dedicated to putting students first.” Massive research on the corporation gives the lie to that assertion. The sooner the stockholders jump ship and the company sinks, the better.

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Georgia Cyber Academy Graduating Class to be Honored at Ceremony on May 21st

— Lt. Governor Cagle to address 2016 graduates, who have earned over $4.5 million in college scholarships —

06:00 ET
from Georgia Cyber Academy

ATLANTA, May 18, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Georgia Cyber Academy (GCA), an accredited, full-time, online public charter school, will celebrate the graduation of the Class of 2016 at noon on Saturday, May 21, 2016, at Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta. Georgia.  Lt. Governor Casey Cagle will provide the commencement address to nearly 450 graduates who have, to date, received over $4.5 million in scholarships including over $3.6 million in Hope Scholarship funds.

The first virtual charter school in Georgia history and currently the largest public school in Georgia, GCA is open to all students who reside in Georgia and serves students from all 159 counties across the state.

The graduation ceremony will also include an address from Ryan Mahoney, GCA Board Chair, as well as Stuart J. Udell, CEO of K12 Inc., the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs.

Recognized by the Georgia Department of Education as an AP STEM Achievement School, GCA gives advanced learners the ability to progress faster in subjects at which they excel, including opportunities for advancement in STEM education and through dual enrollment.

College or career minded GCA students can choose from a broad range of profession-focused courses in order to gain a competitive edge for the future, discover their path after high school, explore a possible college major, or take college courses for both high school and college credit at one of the 46 Georgia colleges and Universities that participate in GCA’s Dual Enrollment program.

During this school year the 85 GCA students that participated in the dual enrollment program earned a total of 1,617 college credits, or the equivalent of $889,350 in tuition savings.

Georgia Cyber Academy students are driven to succeed and passionate about their school and communities,” said Matthew Arkin, Head of School at Georgia Cyber Academy. “This Class of 2016 has impressed all of us with their motivation to learn and seek more out of their education.”

GCA senior Evelyn Bailey is this year’s Valedictorian, and she will address her fellow graduates at the ceremony. Evelyn plans to attend the University of Pennsylvania and study digital media design, focusing on the computer science behind animation.

“At GCA, I was able to create a unique class schedule that allowed me to take several college courses at Kennesaw State University during my senior year of high school,” said Evelyn, who enrolled at GCA when she was in 4th grade. “I could do my classwork and homework on my own time, as well as get involved in several extracurricular groups, including a writing club, National Honor Society, and Student Council.”

Other GCA graduates have been accepted into prestigious colleges and universities such as Brown, Georgia Tech, University of South Carolina, Morehouse College, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Tuskegee University and Full Sail University.

More information on GCA can be found online at the school website: http://gca.k12.com/.     

About Georgia Cyber Academy

Georgia Cyber Academy (GCA) is an accredited, full-time online public school program that serves students in grades K through 12. As part of the Georgia public school system, GCA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE:  LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about GCA, visit http://gca.k12.com/.    

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150528/219036LOGO

SOURCE Georgia Cyber Academy

Idaho Technical Career Academy Relaunches to Help Meet State’s Job Growth Surge

Idaho’s only CTE-focused online public school provides technical and specialty trade job skills for high school students

06:00 ET
from Idaho Technical Career Academy

BOISE, Idaho, May 12, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Board members of the Idaho Career and College Readiness Academy, along with partner K12 Inc., (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s leading provider of online education programs for students in kindergarten through high school, today announced that they are changing the name of their online technical high school for students in Idaho. The school will now be known as Idaho Technical Career Academy (ITCA).

Idaho Technical Career Academy is an important education option for Idaho students, especially following recent reports from both the Department of Labor and federal Bureau of Labor Statistics that identify the state of Idaho as the state experiencing the fastest job growth in the past year. Employment in Idaho has increased 3.6 percent between March 2015 and March 2016.

The surge of job opportunities in Idaho will need to be met. ITCA is an online public charter school that provides opportunities for students to obtain technical and specialty trade skills by offering four years of occupational training in an industry pathway of their choice. Courses are delivered online and students earn can earn industry-recognized certifications and college credits to give them a post-graduation edge.  

The Idaho Technical Career Academy (ITCA) provides four programs option for students in key industries of growth in the state: Business Administration, Automated Manufacturing, Web Design, and Health Science. The intent of the school is to develop a sequence of instruction that teaches students occupational skills while ultimately providing a pathway to job opportunities or to a technical college program upon graduation. 

“We want our students to graduate from ITCA with the skill set necessary to earn one of the many new jobs in our state, so we really prepare the whole package” said Monti Pittman, Head of School for Idaho Technical Academy. “It’s academics and training, but also the skills used in every career, like resume writing and interviewing techniques.”

“With the growing demand for skilled laborers, we are thrilled by the career and technical focus of ITCA,” said Kerry Wysocki, ITCA Board Chairman and general manager of Northwest Machining and Manufacturing, Inc. “We have such a need for qualified technical workers that we know these students will have a bright future ahead of them.”

ITCA’s digital learning expands the reach and opportunities for students – the online school will equip students with vital technical skills that will prepare them to succeed in the workplace regardless of where they reside in Idaho. Additionally, the online school provides a flexible learning environment that enables students the opportunity to partner with professionals and companies to apply the skills they are learning in a specific industry.

In addition to the industry-focused curriculum, ITCA offers students state-of-the-art academic coursework and content using K12’s nationally-acclaimed, award-winning curriculum and learning programs. K12’s personalized academic programs are designed to work for all types of students, from advanced learners to students with special needs. Certified teachers will provide instruction, guidance and support, and will interact regularly with students using innovative technology and web-based classrooms. 

To help families learn more about the program, ITCA will host information sessions and community events around the state, as well as several online information sessions. For details, visit the school website: http://itca.k12.com/

About Idaho Technical Academy
Idaho Technical Academy (ITCA) is a full-time online public school program that serves students in grades 9 through 12 statewide. As part of the Idaho public school system, ITCA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE:  LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about ITCA, visit http://itca.k12.com/.    

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160511/366772LOGO

SOURCE Idaho Technical Career Academy

Related Links

http://itca.k12.com

Crumbling Foundations 7

Don’t fool Idaho, either


By Bill Cope

“The more desperate parents can be convinced that the public system is beyond salvation, the better positioned education-for-profit interests are.”

—from “Crumbling Foundations 1,” Feb. 16, 2011

If quoting myself from five years ago seems self-indulgent, forgive me. But after running this series through seven installments from 2011 to March 3, 2016, I’ve never found anything else said that nails more succinctly what I, and others, believe the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation is up to.

That quote is exactly what the foundation’s meddling in the politics of public education is about: Parents, who understandably want the best future for their children, are being sold the false and frightening notion that if they don’t allow politicians to direct more and more public monies dedicated to education into for-profit ventures, their kids will suffer the consequences.

I resurrected this series in response to the foundation’s latest spiel—its ubiquitous ad featuring a kid getting on the bus at school, but not showing up as expected at home.

If I believed the sole motive behind that ad was to promote the best solutions to problems no one can honestly deny are plaguing modern education, I wouldn’t be as outraged at the disingenuousness of it. But for at least 15 years, key players in the Albertson Foundation have been investing—heavily—in the very thing they are so heavily promoting. This has to do with much more than our nation’s education policies. If you’ve ever wondered how the very rich just keep getting richer—how the rush of wealth to the “1 percent” never seems to even slow down, let alone stop—the influence that Foundation leaders have exerted on Idaho politics with ample complicity from Idaho politicians can be considered a manual on how, with enough money priming the right pumps, one can gain access to that great aquifer of steady revenue: the American taxpayer.

Following is a timeline assembled largely by Grove Koger, a lifelong friend and a very picky researcher. Further information came from an Associated Press probe into the relationships between the foundation, at least one member of the corporate for-profit education community and ex-Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna’s push to radically reform Idaho’s schools.

There is nothing new about any of this. Most of it relates to the decade leading to Luna’s reform scheme. But as the Albertson Foundation has shown, it refuses to give up on making that scheme a reality, so must we keep reminding ourselves why we rejected it so decisively.

• Together, Joseph Scott—the grandson of Joe and Kathryn Albertson and heir to much of their fortune—and his business partner, Thomas Wilford, founded Alscott Inc., an investment arm of the Albertson-Scott family. Wilford was installed as president of the business concern in 1993. From 1995 to 2003, he was also the president of the Albertson Foundation. Even now, Alscott and the foundation share the same address and, at least until 2011, the same phone number.

• In 2002, the Idaho Virtual Academy was created with administrative direction and educational material provided by K12, Inc., the Virginia-based source of online education founded three years earlier by Bill Bennett, former secretary of education. Bennett had contributed $1,000 to Tom Luna’s first, and failed, 2002 campaign.

That same year, while still the president of the Albertson Foundation, Wilford was appointed a seat on the K12, Inc., board of directors. The next year, he was named CEO of the foundation.

• By 2005, the foundation was handing out grants to charter schools, including the Idaho Virtual Academy, which has grown to be the state’s largest online public charter school. Its curriculum was (and is) provided in full by K12. Wilford contributed to Luna’s 2006 campaign, as did out-of-state for-profit education concerns, including K12, whose campaign contributions ran into several thousands of dollars. Wilford’s compensation as a K12 director soared from less than $500 in 2007 to $107,114 in 2010.

• In 2011, immediately after re-election, Luna introduced his reforms, relying heavily on charter schools and for-profit curriculum providers for solutions to Idaho’s public education woes—woes that were largely the result of inadequate funding from the same state leaders who supported Luna. Even while the foundation was running expensive ads in newspapers across Idaho hawking those reforms, Alscott Inc. held 826,000 shares in K12, Inc. By then, Idaho public monies going to K12 coffers was running into the tens of millions of dollars a year. Wrote Joe Miller of the AP: “All the while [Joseph] Scott’s family’s education foundation was actively promoting Idaho’s fledgling online education programs—something Luna has made a centerpiece of his reforms.” The siphoning of those public monies continues to this day.

I have never claimed there isn’t room for improvement in our public schools. But the two most horrifying and damaging blunders Idaho could make is handing over our public schools and/or our public lands to private interests. Once we go there on either, we’ll never get them back.

K12 Inc. Ramps Up Focus on Virtual Career-Tech Education

K12 Inc., the major for-profit provider of online education, is making a big expansion where it says there is strong demand from schools–and employers: career-and-technical studies.

The Herndon, Va.-based company has announced it is launching the Destinations Career Academy of Wisconsin, expected to enroll high school students beginning this fall.

Additionally, the company says it will open two more online schools with a career-and-technical focus in other parts of the country soon. And more growth in career-themed education is likely to come in the years ahead, said Lynda Cloud, K12’s executive vice president for products and technology.

“We really needed to do this because our economy needs it, our businesses need it, and our kids need it,” Cloud said in an interview. Interest from students so far, she said, has been “overwhelming.”

K12 says it is offering career-oriented courses in four “clusters”: architecture and construction; business management and administration; health science; and information technology.

Teachers licensed by the state of Wisconsin will lead the courses, and students who graduate will receive a high school diploma.

The school has also partnered with the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 139, a Wisconsin trade union that mostly represents heavy equipment operators working in the construction industry, and Fox Valley Technical College.

“This revolutionary new school helps meet our state’s critical workforce needs,” Terry McGowan, the president of the operating engineers, said in a statement. The Wisconsin school, he predicted, will give students the preparation they need “to access the many available technical and high-paying jobs that help our state grow.”

K12 worked with the union and the college to develop an academic pathway in construction. The “pre-apprenticeship” program will be directed by the operating engineers, and it will seek to give students hands-on experience to joining jobs in that field.

Fox Valley Technical College will provide students with opportunities to take dual-credit, tech-prep courses that combine computer-based and in-person teaching.

In addition to launching the new school, K12 offers an extensive number of individual courses focused on career-and-technical education separately through Fuel Education, a division of the company that provides courses and curriculum.

K12 has drawn sharp criticism over the years from those who question the quality of its programs, and accuse it pushing too hard for profit, mostly by aggressively recruiting students who may not be well-suited to online studies to enroll. The company has said its online programs help students who have struggled academically or socially in traditional brick-and-mortar settings, and that the virtual approach gives students and families the flexibility and customized lessons they need.

One of the central arguments that critics make of online education, including K12’s programs, is that the online experience cannot match the traditional teacher-to-student interactions found in many classrooms. It’s difficult to keep those students on-track, detractors say, and too few online programs put forth the effort.

Cloud says that there will be requirements in its Wisconsin program for students to have training with local program partners on job sites, and in person with professionals, with the amount of those requirements varying by the course.

K12’s approach is not “one-size-fits all,” she said. Nurses-in-training, for instance, would have extensive practice working directly with patients. Other practical, job-site experience will be tailored to industry demands, Cloud said.

The Destinations Career Academy will operate as charter school that is authorized by the McFarland School District, which is located in the Madison, Wisconsin area.

Correction: This post originally misstated the membership of the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 139, which represents primarily heavy-equipment operators in the construction trades.


See also:


Follow @EdWeekSCavanagh and @EdMarketBrief for the latest news on industry and innovation in education.

K12 Inc. Ramps Up Focus on Virtual Career-Tech Education

K12 Inc., the major for-profit provider of online education, is making a big expansion where it says there is strong demand from schools–and employers: career-and-technical studies.

The Herndon, Va.-based company has announced it is launching the Destinations Career Academy of Wisconsin, expected to enroll high school students beginning this fall.

Additionally, the company says it will open two more online schools with a career-and-technical focus in other parts of the country soon. And more growth in career-themed education is likely to come in the years ahead, said Lynda Cloud, K12’s executive vice president for products and technology.

“We really needed to do this because our economy needs it, our businesses need it, and our kids need it,” Cloud said in an interview. Interest from students so far, she said, has been “overwhelming.”

K12 says it is offering career-oriented courses in four “clusters”: architecture and construction; business management and administration; health science; and information technology.

Teachers licensed by the state of Wisconsin will lead the courses, and students who graduate will receive a high school diploma.

The school has also partnered with the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 139, a Wisconsin trade union of pipefitters and construction workers, and Fox Valley Technical College.

“This revolutionary new school helps meet our state’s critical workforce needs,” Terry McGowan, the president of the operating engineers, said in a statement. The Wisconsin school, he predicted, will give students the preparation they need “to access the many available technical and high-paying jobs that help our state grow.”

K12 worked with the union and the college to develop an academic pathway in construction. The “pre-apprenticeship” program will be directed by the operating engineers, and it will seek to give students hands-on experience to joining jobs in that field.

Fox Valley Technical College will provide students with opportunities to take dual-credit, tech-prep courses that combine computer-based and in-person teaching.

In addition to launching the new school, K12 offers an extensive number of individual courses focused on career-and-technical education separately through Fuel Education, a division of the company that provides courses and curriculum.

K12 has drawn sharp criticism over the years from those who question the quality of its programs, and accuse it pushing too hard for profit, mostly by aggressively recruiting students who may not be well-suited to online studies to enroll. The company has said its online programs help students who have struggled academically or socially in traditional brick-and-mortar settings, and that the virtual approach gives students and families the flexibility and customized lessons they need.

One of the central arguments that critics make of online education, including K12’s programs, is that the online experience cannot match the traditional teacher-to-student interactions found in many classrooms. It’s difficult to keep those students on-track, detractors say, and too few online programs put forth the effort.

Cloud says that there will be requirements in its Wisconsin program for students to have training with local program partners on job sites, and in person with professionals, with the amount of those requirements varying by the course.

K12’s approach is not “one-size-fits all,” she said. Nurses-in-training, for instance, would have extensive practice working directly with patients. Other practical, job-site experience will be tailored to industry demands, Cloud said.

The Destinations Career Academy will operate as charter school that is authorized by the McFarland School District, which is located in the Madison, Wisconsin area.


See also:


Follow @EdWeekSCavanagh and @EdMarketBrief for the latest news on industry and innovation in education.

Minnesota Virtual Academy to Begin 14th School Year Serving Students Statewide

Minnesota Virtual Academy to Begin 14th School Year Serving Students Statewide – Tuition-free online public school recognized for improved outcomes; continues accepting enrollments –

Minnesota Virtual Academy, a program of Houston Public Schools

HOUSTON, Minn., Sept. 2, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Minnesota Virtual Academy (MNVA), an accredited, tuition-free, online public school, welcomes new and returning students for the 2015-2016 academic year, which begins September 8. Now entering its 14th year of serving students across the state of Minnesota, MNVA takes an individualized approach to learning by combining online instruction and hands-on curriculum with the support of Minnesota-licensed teachers and an active school community.

MNVA will host a back-to-school open house for students and their parents on Friday, September 11, 2015, in Plymouth, Minn. Families who are interested in the program, but are not yet enrolled, are also invited to attend to learn more from MNVA teachers, students and parents. Details can be found at http://mnva.k12.com/.

“Minnesota Virtual Academy is a leader of educational innovation in the state,” said Krin Abraham, Head of School at MNVA. “As one of the first statewide online programs in Minnesota, MNVA has consistently provided students with the individualized approach they need in order to learn and grow to their full potential.”

In a recent K12 report, MNVA was recognized for improving its overall academic results and raising student proficiency rates in Reading and Math.

MNVA provides a rigorous and engaging curriculum, including courses in language arts/English, math, science, history, world languages, art and music, as well as elective and Advanced Placement® courses for high school students. The school also offers an advanced learner program and opportunities in STEM education, as well as the ability for students to earn college credit while in high school. Students graduate with a high school diploma that meets all state requirements.

More information on MNVA, upcoming events and how to enroll can be found online at http://mnva.k12.com/.

About Minnesota Virtual Academy

Minnesota Virtual Academy (MNVA) is an accredited, full- and part-time online public school program of Houston Public Schools that serves students in grades K through 12. As part of the Minnesota public school system, MNVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation's largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. Students use web-based lessons and hands-on instructional materials which are shipped to their homes. For more information about MNVA, visit http://mnva.k12.com.

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150311/181153LOGO

SOURCE Minnesota Virtual Academy

Wisconsin Virtual Academy Celebrates Start of New School Year

Published:

– Tuition-free online public charter school recognized for higher achievement; school to begin 13th year serving students statewide –

MCFARLAND, Wis., Aug. 24, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Wisconsin Virtual Academy (WIVA), a tuition-free online public charter school, welcomes new and returning students for the 2015-2016 academic year, beginning September 1. WIVA accepts students statewide in grades K through 12 and takes an individualized approach to learning by combining online instruction and hands-on curriculum with the support of Wisconsin-licensed teachers and an active school community.

WIVA is the only school in Wisconsin offering the complete K12 curriculum, developed by K12 Inc., the nation's largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs.

In a recent K12 report, WIVA was credited for making achievement gains in Reading and Math and improving student outcomes over time.

In July 2015, WIVA welcomed Nicholaus Sutherland as the Head of School. Sutherland previously served as the K-12 Assistant Principal/Director of Special Programs at Washington Virtual Academies. He has a track record of implementing new programs that result in the closing of educational gaps and dramatic increases in student achievement.

“Effective use of assessment allows Wisconsin Virtual Academy teachers and staff know what students need in order to reach their full potential,” said Nicholaus Sutherland, Head of School at Wisconsin Virtual Academy. “Our goal is to continue to provide an individualized approach to education, focusing on our mission to provide students with the individual tools they need to succeed.”

This year, WIVA will launch a Family Academic Support Team (FAST) to bring a holistic approach to supporting each student's educational progress. FAST staff members and teachers will work together to meet the needs of the student and family, including helping students work through non-academic issues that may be affecting their performance in school.

WIVA provides courses in language arts/English, math, science, history and art, with world languages and music as electives for students in grades K-8. The high school program offers students more than 150 core, elective, Honors, and Advanced Placement® courses, including world languages. Students use web-based lessons and hands-on instructional materials that are shipped to their home.

Families interested in learning more about WIVA can find more information at http://wiva.k12.com.

About Wisconsin Virtual Academy Wisconsin Virtual Academy (WIVA), an online public charter school authorized by the McFarland School District, is the largest full-time online public charter school serving students in grades K through 12 in the state. As part of the Wisconsin public school system, WIVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc., the nation's largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about WIVA, visit http://wiva.k12.com.

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150126/171444LOGO

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/wisconsin-virtual-academy-celebrates-start-of-new-school-year-300131637.html

SOURCE Wisconsin Virtual Academy

Copyright (C) 2015 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

Ohio Virtual Academy Welcomes K-12 Students to Enroll for 2015-2016 School Year

– Tuition-free online public school offers families an alternative education option –

MAUMEE, Ohio, March 16, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Ohio Virtual Academy (OHVA), an accredited, full-time, online public community school, welcomes families with students in grades K-12 to enroll for the 2015-2016 academic year. OHVA is open to all students who reside in . By combining online instruction, hands-on curriculum and the support of -licensed teachers, OHVA cultivates an individualized education for each student.

To help parents and children learn more about the program, now in its 13th year, OHVA hosts in-person information sessions around the state each month, online information sessions, and upcoming community events in Cincinnati, Mentor and Bowling Green. Interested families are encouraged to visit the school's website for details on these upcoming events, as well as more about OHVA and how to enroll.

“The structure and support provided by Ohio Virtual Academy is helping my son significantly improve his academic performance, as well as his self-confidence,” said Dina Gast, the parent of an 8th grader at OHVA.

Students who enroll in OHVA receive an individualized education experience, designed to let them discover their own learning style. OHVA gives advanced learners the ability to progress faster in subjects in which they excel, including opportunities for advancement in STEM education.

OHVA provides a rigorous and engaging curriculum, including courses in language arts/English, math, science, history, world languages, art and music, as well as elective and Advanced Placement® courses for high school students. College or career minded students can choose from a broad range of profession-focused courses in order to gain a competitive edge for the future, discover their path after high school or explore a possible college major.

“The OHVA community is a strong support system for families who are interested in getting more involved in their children's education,” said Dr. Kristin Stewart, Head of School at Ohio Virtual Academy. “Our teachers work closely with our parents, and in addition, organize opportunities for families to come together for social and academic enrichment at museums, science centers, libraries and activity based venues.”

More information on the school, the upcoming community events, and how to apply can be found online here: www.k12.com/ohva.

About Ohio Virtual Academy



Ohio Virtual Academy (OHVA) is an accredited, full-time online public school serving students in grades K through 12. As part of the public school system, OHVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation's largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about OHVA, visit www.k12.com/ohva.

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ohio-virtual-academy-welcomes-k-12-students-to-enroll-for-2015-2016-school-year-300050899.html

SOURCE Ohio Virtual Academy

Copyright (2015) PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved

Fuel Education Adds 70 New High School Courses to its 2015-2016 Catalog

The Fuel Education (FuelEd) has recently added 70 new high school courses to its online catalog for the 2015-2016 school year. This step will help school districts offer more options for high school courses, improve academic outcomes, and help students to prepare themselves for state exams and high stakes tests.

(Photo : Mario Tama | Getty Images News) High school students on their graduation day.

The Fuel Education (FuelEd) has recently added 70 new high school courses to its online catalog for the 2015-2016 school year. This step will help school districts offer more options for high school courses, improve academic outcomes, and help students to prepare themselves for state exams and high stakes tests.

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According to FuelEd, the expanded courses aim to meet the needs of their customers who are seeking for courses to address specific student segments.

“School districts face the complex challenge of not only meeting the diverse needs of high school students, but also preparing them for high stakes tests and graduation, whether they are college or career bound,” said FuelEd general manager Gregg Levin in a press release.

Levin added that with their new expanded high school curriculum, their school and district partners would be able to offer more course options to students of different levels to help them succeed in life after graduation.

The new FuelEd Online Courses for high school includes the following features: research-based curriculum, clear layout of objectives to be mastered in each lesson, unit, and semester, easy-to-navigate online content, engaging interactive content, online (or physical) labs, books, writing, and clear assessment tools.

To date, FuelEd is offering more than 500 courses and titles for pre-K through 12th grade. In addition, the FuelEd Online Courses high school curriculum now comes with more than 230 courses, more than 75 of which are electives and 35 world language courses. Most of these courses are delivered with Spanish translation, text to speech, and dictionary support.

According to FuelEd, all these online courses are available through PEAK, an open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform that allows a single, unified view of online and blended learning activities across multiple solutions for administrators, teachers, and students.

For more information about FuelEd high school courses, visit http://www.getfueled.com/.

Tags : Fuel Education, 70 New High School Courses, online catalog, academic outcomes, online education, k-12

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