Pikes Peak Early College Teams with Fuel Education to Help Students Earn College Credit and Professional Certifications during High School

Students across Colorado can apply to enroll for the 2016-2017 school
year now to get a free community college education

August 08, 2016 08:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time

HERNDON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–According to a
report
from the Georgetown
Center on Education and the Workforce
, by 2020, 65 percent of all
jobs in the economy will require post-secondary education or training
beyond high school. Therefore, students who still experience barriers to
achieving this level of education will have limited workforce options.
To help students overcome these barriers, Pikes
Peak Early College
(PPEC) helps students start working toward
post-secondary degrees and certifications in high school.

“A college degree or a professional certification doesn’t have to be
this elusive thing students can’t grasp”

Tweet this

PPEC provides students online core, elective and career technical
education courses from Fuel
Education
™ (FuelEd™). The program uses the personalized learning
platform PEAK™, in combination with personalized college and career
counseling, to create a customized degree plan based on each student’s
interests, strengths, and goals for the future. PPEC works with both
FuelEd online teachers, as well as district-employed teachers, to
facilitate a blended learning model.

“Many of our students are first-generation college students or are part
of populations that are under-represented in post-secondary
institutions,” said Dave Knoche, Executive Principal at PPEC. “PPEC
provides these students with the monetary, academic, and emotional
support they need to achieve their goals after high school. If we didn’t
help these students, it would be an enormous disservice to our youth and
our society.”

PPEC students focus on getting more than just a high school diploma.
They are working toward an associate’s degree, 60 credits to transfer to
a four-year college or a professional certification all while completing
their high school requirements. To determine what route is best for each
student, PPEC’s college and career counseling staff members conduct
individual meetings to determine each student’s interests and then
create an appropriate degree plan. This individualized degree plan takes
into account their current college and career readiness skills, their
passions, and their plans for the future. Throughout their four to six
years at PPEC, students receive personalized advisory services to make
sure they are on track with their degree plan, that their plan continues
to fit their skill level and future interests, and that their credits
will transfer to the post-secondary institution or certification program
of their choice.

Once their degree plans are made, students begin working on their high
school coursework using FuelEd
Online Courses
. Students take a combination of online core classes
to meet graduation requirements and online elective courses to help them
hone their interests for college study or their future career. The
school also plans on using FuelEd’s Career
Readiness Pathways™
for students interested in a career technical
education. Courses center around one of four Career Clusters: business
management and administration, manufacturing, health science, and
information technology.

Because they can complete their coursework online, students only attend
a physical school three days a week. When students are on campus,
teachers lead project-based learning activities to compliment the FuelEd
Online Courses. The remaining two days are open for students to study at
home, participate in internships or shadowing opportunities, or attend
classes on college campuses. In addition to being the only early college
with a blended model in Colorado, what makes PPEC so unique is that each
student can take up to 15 credits per semester at no cost to them, thus
greatly alleviating the financial burden of attending college for
students and their families.

However, not every student is ready to start taking college courses as a
freshman. For students who need remediation prior to taking
college-level courses, PPEC creates custom skill-enhancement classes.
Using PEAK, PPEC determines which skills each student is missing and
designs a custom course by piecing together units and lessons from
various FuelEd Online Courses to ensure each student learns the concepts
they need prior to taking college-level courses . Traditionally, any
college student who needs remediation must pay for and take remedial
courses, which do not count for credit. By completing remedial courses
during high school, PPEC is, once again, helping students save money and
streamline the college experience.

“A college degree or a professional certification doesn’t have to be
this elusive thing students can’t grasp,” said Knoche. “In addition to
our personalized counseling and flexible learning environment, we are
guiding students in the direction of a four-year college, but in a
fiscally responsible way so students aren’t riddled with debt. We’re not
just educating, we’re changing lives.”

To learn more about PPEC, visit d49.org/ppec.
Students from all over the state of Colorado are eligible to apply. To
learn more about the enrollment process for the 2016-17 school year,
click here.

About Fuel Education

Fuel Education™ partners with school districts to fuel personalized
learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the
classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through
12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and
blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning
Platform, PEAK™, enables teachers to customize courses using their own
content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open
educational resources. Fuel Education offers one of the industry’s
largest catalogs of K–12 digital curriculum, certified instruction,
professional development, and educational services. FuelEd has helped
2,000 school districts to improve student outcomes and better serve
diverse student populations. To learn more, visit getfueled.com and Twitter.

©2016 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education, PEAK,
and FuelEd are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All
other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Contacts

Fuel EducationBeth Halloran, 703.436.3263bhalloran@getfueled.comorRachael
Ballard, 410.975.9638Rachael@kehcomm.com

This Free Education Comes with Strings Attached

What if you were able to homeschool for free?

This fall, Omaha Public Schools is opening a new online kindergarten-through-8th-grade school specifically targeting homeschooled students. In fact, only homeschooled students are eligible to enroll this year.

The program, Omaha Virtual School (OVS), is a publicly funded school that allows students to complete much of their coursework from the comforts of home. Enrolled students may also receive access to a computer and low-cost internet as an added benefit. The school is being marketed as the best of both worlds: Homeschooling with the support of professionals—and no price tag.

Sound too good to be true? It might be. Before you sign up, HSLDA recommends that you count the cost. Public programs like OVS take control of the academic curriculum and coursework away from parents and place it in the hands of the public school system. While parents have some involvement, they play of the role of “coach” and make way for certified teachers to do the bulk of the teaching. Parents will have little to no say in the educational objectives or course content of OVS classes.

Consider also the concerning results of studies on the academic achievement of publicly funded virtual schools in other states:

  • A National Education Policy Center study by Western Michigan University researchers showed that only 27.7% of full-time virtual schools run by K12 Inc. met the federal academic progress goals (compared to 52% of traditional public schools). Students in K12 schools scored lower in both reading and math and had an on-time graduation rate of a mere 49%, compared to a statewide average of 79% in states where K12 schools were located.
  • In 2011, Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) reported that virtual students in Pennsylvania scored 13% worse in reading and 24% worse in math than students in public brick-and-mortar schools.
  • In its 2015 Online Charter School Study, CREDO found innovative new research suggesting that students of online charter schools had significantly weaker academic performance in math and reading, compared with their counterparts in conventional schools.
  • As reported in Education Week in January 2016, the Walton Family Foundation, which has pumped millions of dollars into virtual learning, conducted a series of studies on the academic achievement of these virtual schools. The conclusion: “stark evidence that most online charters have a negative impact on students’ academic achievement.”
  • Individual news stories abound using the familiar phrases such as “lagging behind” and “smaller learning gains” to describe the academic plight of virtual school students. For example, a 2011 New York Times article on the Agora Cyber Charter School reported that 60% of students are behind in math, 50% are behind in reading, and one-third do not graduate on time.

This research, coupled with the evidence showing the profound academic success of private home education, indicates that the home environment is not the only key to homeschoolers’ academic success. HSLDA believes one of the primary reasons homeschooled students excel is the regular parental involvement and control of the educational program. Parents know their children best and care about their children more than any other person or entity. Thus, they are best situated to craft a custom-tailored educational plan to meet the individual needs of each unique child.

We understand that homeschooling is hard work for both parents and students. And we know it comes with a price tag: though options for homeschool curriculum abound as the number of homeschooled students has now topped 2 million, this material is not free or even cheap. However, HSLDA cautions families to carefully calculate the cost of publicly funded free education before handing over educational control to the public school. Students in virtual schools perform worse academically than their peers, on average, and public funding of homeschooling brings public control and standardization, eliminating the distinctiveness of private homeschooling and inviting regulation.

As always, feel free to contact our office with your questions about homeschooling in Nebraska.

Resources

Homeschool Research

Understanding and Improving Full-Time Virtual Schools (National Education Policy Center)

Walton Family Foundation: We Must Rethink Online Learning (Education Week)

Profits and Questions at Online Charter Schools (New York Times)

Studies: Existing full-time virtual schools earn poor grades (Portland Press Herald)

Charter School Performance in Pennsylvania (Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes)

Online Charter School Study 2015 (Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes)

Ohio ignores online school F’s as it evaluates charter school overseers

Online schools like Ohio Virtual Academy, ECOT and OHDELA with poor state report card grades won’t be counted in this year’s reviews of charter school oversight agencies.

(LANCE MURPHEY)

By

The Plain Dealer
Email the author | Follow on Twitter

on June 14, 2015 at 8:00 AM, updated

COLUMBUS, Ohio — It turns out that Ohio’s grand plan to stop the national ridicule of its charter school system is giving overseers of many of the lowest-performing schools a pass from taking heat for some of their worst problems.

Gov. John Kasich and both houses of the state legislature are banking on a roundabout plan to improve a $1 billion charter school industry that, on average, fails to teach kids across the state as much as the traditional schools right in their own neighborhoods.

But The Plain Dealer has learned that this plan of making charters better by rating their oversight agencies, known as sponsors or authorizers, is pulling its punches and letting sponsors off the hook for years of not holding some schools to high standards.

The state this year has slammed two sponsors/authorizers with “ineffective” ratings so far. But it has given three others the top rating of “exemplary” by overlooking significant drawbacks for two of them and mixed results for the third.

The state’s not penalizing sponsors, we found, for poor graduation rates at dropout recovery schools, portfolios of charter schools that have more bad grades than good ones and, most surprising, failing grades for online schools. 

Online school F grades aren’t counted

We found that the state isn’t counting the performance of online charter schools — one of the most-controversial and lowest-performing charter sectors —  in the calculations in this first year of ratings.

That means that many F-rated charter schools that serve thousands of students won’t be included when their oversight agencies are rated this year.

The Department of Education says recent drops in grades for online schools are “inexplicable” and that it has to develop a way to grade these “unique” schools. 

The omission caught some of the state’s major charter supporters by surprise. The Ohio Alliance for Public Charter Schools, which says that a strong ratings plan is key to improving charters, was certain until recently that online schools would be a factor in the ratings.

Consider the Ohio Council of Community Schools, which collects about $1.5 million in sponsor fees a year from the more than 14,000 students attending Ohio Virtual Academy and OHDELA, the online school run by White Hat Management.

The F grades that the state gave those schools last year for failing to teach kids enough material over the school year didn’t count against the council when it was rated early this year. The result? A perfect academic rating of 100 percent and an overall rating of “exemplary,” the highest available.

This year’s ranking also leaves out dropout recovery schools, another controversial group of 90 charter schools, because separate report cards for those schools aren’t complete.

Mostly “ineffective,” but still “exemplary”

Even without the online schools, the rating system doesn’t set a high standard for the schools a sponsor oversees. Instead of setting a high bar and challenging staff and overseers to meet it, The Plain Dealer’s review shows that the Department of Education set a low standard that’s met much more easily.

In fact, a sponsor can oversee more students in schools that are “ineffective” than are “effective” and still be lauded as “exemplary” this year and next year. Sponsors only have to have 41 percent of students in “effective” schools to meet the state’s goal this year.

Those standards will increase over time, with an eventual goal of 66 percent of a sponsor’s students in “effective” schools. But even by the 2016-17 school year, the state will only require 55 percent.

So the Buckeye Community Hope Foundation, which sponsors 52 schools, wasn’t hammered in its rating this year despite having only 38 percent of students in “effective” schools. 

Since 38 percent is so close to the 41 percent standard, the foundation only lost a few points in its rating and snagged an “exemplary” mark.

Department of Education spokesman John Charlton said online and dropout recovery schools will be included in ratings next year, and that the target for having effective schools will increase over time.

“Keep in mind this is the first year of the evaluation process, and we expect to make improvements to the system,” Charlton said.

Ratings have high stakes

Why do these ratings matter? Because supporters of the charter school concept have portrayed them as a way to put pressure on sponsors to make Ohio’s charter schools something to be proud of, not viewed as a drag on the state’s education system.

Kasich and the legislature are considering tying some incentives and sanctions to the ratings in bills that could be passed by the end of this month. An easy path to the top rating of “exemplary” won’t separate strong oversight from mediocre when cash and other benefits are handed out.

For example, Kasich proposed early this year setting aside $25 million in the state budget for charter schools to spend on new school buildings, but he wants the money to be available to schools with “exemplary” sponsors. His plan passed in the Ohio House,

The Senate may change that plan in the next few days, making the money  available only to highly rated schools, not sponsors.

Kasich and the House have proposed letting schools run by exemplary sponsors seek tax levies from voters, if the local school district agrees. That’s allowed only in Cleveland now.

And Kasich and the House have proposed allowing schools run by exemplary sponsors to offer kindergarten and collect state tax dollars for each kindergarten student.

As a penalty, Kasich and the House have proposed adding a lower rating of “poor” in the ranking, giving these sponsors one year to improve or be shut down.

And though the standards will increase over time, the ratings completed this year will last for three years. Sponsors won’t face any effects from dropout schools, online schools or needing to have more “effective” schools until 2018.

They won’t be rated under higher standards until after the state passes a new two-year budget in 2017 that could offer even more perks and penalties.

Where do these ratings come from?

The state legislature voted to start rating sponsors in 2012 and set up a basic structure in House Bill 555.

Charter school supporters nationally look at sponsor/authorizers as fundamental to making charter schools run well. These agencies are usually local school districts that create one or two charter schools in their cities, but can be statewide charter boards, county Educational Service Centers or, in a national rarity, other nonprofit organizations.

As we reported last year, observers in other states view Ohio as the “wild, wild west” of charter operations because it has so many sponsors and so few rules governing them. The new evaluation system in Ohio was viewed as a way to compel improvement in sponsor quality and, in turn, make schools better.

As ordered in HB 555, academic performance makes up just a third of a sponsor’s rating. The other two components are compliance with all state and federal codes governing sponsors and how well they meet industry standards.

As a result, one third of each sponsor/authorizer rating is based on the quality practices suggested by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers.

How the academic portion would be handled was left up to the Department of Education.

Not counting online schools is a surprise

The state agency decided to drop online schools that serve 40,000 students across the state from the evaluations. In letters to sponsor/authorizers announcing the results of their reviews, David Hansen, executive director of the department’s  Office of Quality School Choice, said that the 2013-14 online school test results will simply be the “base year” to evaluate future performance.

“I wasn’t aware that they (online schools) were not counted in the evaluation,” said Lenny Schafer, executive director of the Ohio Council of Community Schools.

Chad Aldis, vice president of Ohio policy and advocacy of the Fordham Institute, the other charter sponsor that has already received an exemplary rating, said he was unaware of that too. Even though Fordham has been rated, it does have the academic scoring rubric used by the state.

And Darlene Chambers, president and CEO of the Ohio Alliance for Public Charter Schools, said Thursday that she was sure online schools are being counted. She has told people for months, often in formal PowerPoint presentations, that Performance Index scores the state calculates for all of a sponsor’s schools were part of the evaluation.

Performance Index combines test scores across multiple grades and subjects and is the state’s main measure of how much kids know. The sponsor PI scores include online schools.

“E-school outcomes are not being ignored,” Chambers said. “It is captured in that now.”

But when told that the state created a new academic measure that excludes online schools, Chambers said: “If it exists, I’ve not seen it. This is the first time I’ve heard of it.”

Charlton said the Department of Education decided to use the value-added ratings of schools — a measure of student academic progress — instead of the Performance Index in the evaluations.

And the department also chose to set aside value-added results for e-schools, he said, because of concerns over how those scores are calculated.

Concern over scores for online schools

Shafer said a change for the 2011-12 school year about which first-year students in online schools were counted in state report card results caused a dramatic lowering of scores for online schools. Data provided by him shows online schools mostly met or exceeded value-added targets for student growth before the change, but most failed to meet them after the switch.

Charlton said the Department of Education dropped the online schools because of this concern.

“Because the change in the system for measuring performance has had a significant and inexplicable impact on the e-school data, the department decided to take a year to look at those results, identify what caused the significant changes and address those causes by creating a more accurate performance evaluation system,” he said.

It is unclear if there is a calculation “glitch,” as Schafer calls it, or if online schools saw lower grades because report cards started counting under-served kids that should have been counted all along.

Dropout recovery ratings are incomplete

Unlike the online schools, the state planned for a few years to exclude dropout recovery schools — charter schools that serve kids returning to school or at risk of leaving. The legislature decided in 2012 to keep them out because separate report cards for these schools would not be finished in time.

These 90 schools don’t appear on regular state report cards because they serve a different type of student and the state has different expectations for them.

Charlton said these schools will become part of sponsor evaluations next year, once measures of student academic growth there kick in.

“There will be a learning gains measure available starting next year for dropout recovery,” Charlton said. “DOPR (Drop Out Prevention and Recovery) schools are being graded as soon as the grading system is in place.”

For now, sponsors like the Ohio Council of Community Schools face no consequences for overseeing schools like the Life Skills Center of Toledo, that meets no graduation standards. The school graduates only 2.2 percent of students on time.

A tough new growth standard

Instead of using Performance Index as most expected, the Department of Education is using the value-added calculation of how much learning kids accomplish over a school year.

The Department of Education has not published its academic rating criteria. Repeated requests to a link for it went unanswered.

But Charlton said here’s what the department used in the sponsor evaluations:

Charter schools with an A or B grade in value-added — scores that are above average — are counted as “effective” schools.

Schools with a C in value-added — the average grade meant to show that a school met learning expectations — need to have an A, B, or C in Performance Index to be considered “effective.”

If you have a D or F in value-added — grades that reflect kids making less than a year’s progress over a school year — your school is ineffective, regardless of performance score.

That’s a strong departure from the state’s traditional focus on Performance Index, a measure of academic achievement.

We have asked the department to explain why it made this choice, but have not heard back.

To evaluate a sponsor/authorizer of multiple schools, the state counts the number of students in schools that meet the “effective” criteria vs. those in schools that are “ineffective.”

It then looks at the ratio of “effective” school “seats” to “ineffective” ones.

More “ineffective” than “effective”

This first year, the state is asking sponsors’ to have a 0.7 to 1 ratio of effective to ineffective seats — less than one effective for every ineffective one — in their portfolios. As a percentage basis, that’s the 41 percent effective mentioned earlier.

If a sponsor meets that target, it receives all 100 points for academic performance in its evaluation.

That means that the Fordham Institute that had an almost equal number of ineffective seats to effective ones at the 10 schools it sponsors, met the state’s bar by 141 percent and earned a perfect academic score.

That came despite overseeing schools with value-added F grades, like Sciotoville Community School in Portsmouth and Cleveland’s Village Prep, normally a well-regarded school for student growth that had abysmal results last year.

And the low bar gave Buckeye Community Hope Foundation only a small penalty for having a ratio of 0.6 effective seats to each effective one.

The target percentages are supposed to rise each year, Charlton said.

Here are the expected ratios:

2013-14: 0.7 to 1.

2014-15: 0.85 to 1.

2015-16: 1.05 to 1.

2016-17: 1.25 to 1.

Eventual goal: 2 to 1.

Though sponsors have known that their academic performance would be evaluated since 2012, Charlton said the state agency is phasing in the standards because of the contracts that sponsors have with individual schools.

Those contracts, which can last five years, spell out academic goals. Sponsors can’t change the expectations midway through, Charlton said.

To follow education news from Cleveland and affecting all of Ohio, follow this reporter on Facebook as @PatrickODonnellReporter

Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy to Graduate Class of 2016

— Statewide K-12 online school’s third graduating class is largest to date —

06:00 ET
from Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy

MANISTEE, Mich., June 1, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy (MGLVA), a tuition-free, online public charter school, will recognize its largest graduating class to date at a ceremony on June 4 in Okemos, Michigan. MGLVA continues to grow since opening in 2013, with 87 graduates this year, including 21 students who graduated early in January 2016.

“Watching our group of successful graduates get larger with every school year is inspiring,” said Kendall Schroeder, Head of School at Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy. “The Class of 2016 has shown us what’s possible when learning is more individualized. We offer an education model that allows our teachers and staff to work more closely with each student to help them achieve academic and personal growth.”

Twelve students are graduating with honors this year. Christine Valencia is the Valedictorian, and Avalon McKinney is the Salutatorian.

Members of the Class of 2016 plan to attend institutions of higher education and career training programs, including Oral Roberts University, University of Michigan, Oakland University and Paul Mitchell School of Cosmetology.

MGLVA is an alternative education option that includes online instruction, hands-on curriculum and the support of Michigan-licensed teachers. MGLVA accepts students in grades K through 12 who reside anywhere in the state. MGLVA families benefit from the flexibility that comes with online access to an engaging, rigorous curriculum designed to give each student an individualized learning experience. Students are not forced to move at the same pace that a traditional classroom moves. MGLVA students can move more quickly through their lessons or take more time, depending on how swiftly they master certain skills and concepts.

High school students enjoy a course catalog of more than 150 core, elective and Advanced Placements (AP) courses. Math, English, science and history courses are offered in multiple versions to meet the needs of diverse learners. Up to four levels of World Languages are offered as well. Students graduate with a high school diploma that meets all state requirements.

MGLVA hosts a series of online information sessions as a way to help parents learn about the program. Find more details about the school at its website here: http://mglva.k12.com.

About Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy 

Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy (MGLVA) is a full-time, online public charter school authorized by Manistee Area Public Schools, serving students in grades K through 12. MGLVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about MGLVA, visit http://mglva.k12.com.

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150316/181974LOGO

SOURCE Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy

Related Links

http://mglva.k12.com

Investors and Teachers Unions Upbraid Online Charter School Operator K12


Dec 17, 2015

THE WINTER OF OUR DISCONTENT: K12, an online charter school provider, held its annual investor meeting December 16 to disastrous results. Investors voted down the company’s plan for executive pay, and teachers unions and representatives from K12’s own schools protested outside the meeting. Advisory firm Glass Lewis & Co. advised shareholders to vote against the pay proposal because of a “substantial disconnect between compensation and performance results,” Buzzfeed News reports. K12’s stock is down 75 percent from a high in 2013.

K12 is faced with damning evidence. A 2015 report found that students enrolled in K12’s schools and other online charters did not measure up to their peers at offline schools. California’s attorney general Kamala Harris has also opened an investigation into K12’s practices. As for the executive pay, K12 paid CEO Nathaniel Davis $5.33 million and its chief financial officer $3.6 million in 2015.

Add Comment
Close

Comments

Online public school debuts in Eufaula

Eufaula City Schools earlier this month announced the opening of the Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools – a new statewide online public school.

Alabama Department of Education approved the new institution, which is currently open to students across the state.



Enlarge

The Alabama Virtual Academy will serve students in grades K-2 for the first year and expand to offer additional grades in the coming years.

The online school is a tuition-free, full-time public school.

Classes began on Sept. 8 and the school is currently accepting new enrollments.

Enrollment information for the school can be found by clicking here

"Eufaula City Schools is excited to offer this innovative online public school to families in Alabama," said Eddie Tyler, superintendent of Eufaula City Schools. "Technology is the future in education, and online schools are a proven educational model. Our online public school will provide families a high-quality option and give students the individualized instruction and support to succeed. Alabama Virtual Academy reflects our school system's mission of 'building our future on a tradition of excellence.'"

Students enrolled in the school will learn outside the traditional classroom, while participating in teacher-led instruction online. State-certified teachers will work in close partnership with parents who serve as learning coaches for the students.

The new school is made possible by a partnership with K12 Inc. – the country's largest provider of K-12 online and blended school offerings.

Legislation passed by the state legislature requires all Alabama school systems to adopt a plan to serve students through online schools by 2016-17.

Tyler said the Eufaula City School System is in a strong position to meet that requirement and expand education opportunities for students in its school system and across the state.

"Our partnership with K12 allows us to leverage the expertise and best practices used by a highly qualified team of experienced educators without impacting our system's existing educational programs or personnel," Tyler said. "We are also excited about the opportunity to work with K12 to expand the number of courses we can offer to the students in our school system."

Eufaula Schools partner with K12 Inc. to launch new Alabama Virtual Academy

Posted:

Eufaula Schools partner with K12 Inc. to launch new Alabama Virtual Academy

Eufaula City Schools announced this week that it has opened the Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools, a new statewide online public school. The school received approval from the Alabama Department of Education and is currently open to students across the state. It will serve students in grades K-2 the first year and expand to offer additional grades in subsequent years. 

Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools is a tuition-free, full-time public school. The school starts on September 8 and is currently accepting new enrollments. Enrollment information for the school can be found at www.k12.com/AL.

"Eufaula City Schools is excited to offer this innovative online public school to families in Alabama," Eddie Tyler, Superintendent of Eufaula City Schools, said. "Technology is the future in education, and online schools are a proven educational model. Our online public school will provide families a high-quality option and give students the individualized instruction and support to succeed. Alabama Virtual Academy reflects our school system's mission of 'building our future on a tradition of excellence.'"

Students enrolled at Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools learn outside the traditional classroom and receive all their courses and participate in teacher-led instruction online. State-certified teachers work in close partnership with parents or other guardians who serve as learning coaches for the students.

Eufaula City Schools is partnering with K12 Inc., America's largest provider of K-12 online and blended school offerings. Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools will use K12's award-winning curriculum and academic services. K12-network schools have been recognized for improving student outcomes, closing achievement gaps, helping students succeed, and delivering new instructional tools and programs for teachers. K12 Inc. is accredited by AdvancED, the world's largest education community.

Recent legislation passed by the state legislature requires all Alabama school systems to adopt a plan to serve students through online schools by 2016-17. Eufaula City Schools is in a strong position to meet that requirement and expand education opportunities for students in its school system and across the state.

"Our partnership with K12 allows us to leverage the expertise and best practices used by a highly qualified team of experienced educators without impacting our system's existing educational programs or personnel," Tyler said. "We are also excited about the opportunity to work with K12 to expand the number of courses we can offer to the students in our school system."

Eufaula Schools partner with K12 Inc. to launch new Alabama Virtual Academy

Posted:

Eufaula Schools partner with K12 Inc. to launch new Alabama Virtual Academy

Eufaula City Schools announced this week that it has opened the Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools, a new statewide online public school. The school received approval from the Alabama Department of Education and is currently open to students across the state. It will serve students in grades K-2 the first year and expand to offer additional grades in subsequent years.

Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools is a tuition-free, full-time public school. The school starts on September 8 and is currently accepting new enrollments. Enrollment information for the school can be found at www.k12.com/AL.

Eufaula City Schools is excited to offer this innovative online public school to families in Alabama,” Eddie Tyler, Superintendent of Eufaula City Schools, said. “Technology is the future in education, and online schools are a proven educational model. Our online public school will provide families a high-quality option and give students the individualized instruction and support to succeed. Alabama Virtual Academy reflects our school system's mission of 'building our future on a tradition of excellence.'”

Students enrolled at Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools learn outside the traditional classroom and receive all their courses and participate in teacher-led instruction online. State-certified teachers work in close partnership with parents or other guardians who serve as learning coaches for the students.

Eufaula City Schools is partnering with K12 Inc., America's largest provider of K-12 online and blended school offerings. Alabama Virtual Academy at Eufaula City Schools will use K12's award-winning curriculum and academic services. K12-network schools have been recognized for improving student outcomes, closing achievement gaps, helping students succeed, and delivering new instructional tools and programs for teachers. K12 Inc. is accredited by AdvancED, the world's largest education community.

Recent legislation passed by the state legislature requires all Alabama school systems to adopt a plan to serve students through online schools by 2016-17. Eufaula City Schools is in a strong position to meet that requirement and expand education opportunities for students in its school system and across the state.

“Our partnership with K12 allows us to leverage the expertise and best practices used by a highly qualified team of experienced educators without impacting our system's existing educational programs or personnel,” Tyler said. “We are also excited about the opportunity to work with K12 to expand the number of courses we can offer to the students in our school system.”

Welcome!

Company News Company Site Premium Log In

Membership Home Portfolio Stocks Bonds Funds ETFs CEF Markets Tools Real Life Finance Discuss

Nasdaq

4558.26 51.77(1.15%)

S&P 500

1888.81 21.20(1.14%)

DJIA

15844.16 177.72(1.13%)

Gold

1123.00 -15.20(-1.34%)

Light Crude

39.17 -0.14(-0.36%)

Nasdaq

4558.26 51.77(1.15%)

S&P 500

1888.81 21.20(1.14%)

DJIA

15844.16 177.72(1.13%)

Gold

1123.00 -15.20(-1.34%)

Light Crude

39.17 -0.14(-0.36%)

K12 Inc

LRN

2014 Executive Compensation Compensation vs. Performance (1-Year % Change)
Total Compensation 1-Year % Change CEO Compensation Stock Return Revenue Return on Equity Net Income
$16,575,242

-22.44 %

-55.42% -45.43% 3.16% -44.32% -47.37%

Total Executive Compensation

LRN

http://thetruthaboutk12.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/http://thetruthaboutk12.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

8 mil

16 mil

24 mil

7.27 mil

8.89 mil

10.89 mil

21.37 mil

16.58 mil

  • Stock Price
  • Note: Currency in USD.

    See Salary, Bonus, and Pay details for Jobs at LRN

    Key Executive Compensation

    LRN

    Name/Title 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
    Key Executive Compensation 2,677,804 6,252,933 7,242,370 18,776,082 16,575,242
    Nathaniel A. Davis/Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer 9,543,607 4,254,742
    Ronald J. Packard/Former Chief Executive Officer 2,677,804 6,252,933 3,960,499 4,126,867 4,002,927
    James J. Rhyu/Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer 3,271,222 824,322
    Timothy L Murray/President and Chief Operating Officer 3,281,871 1,076,053 5,528,066
    Howard D. Polsky/Executive Vice President, Secretary and General Counsel 758,333 1,110,234
    Allison Cleveland/Executive Vice President of School Management and Services 854,951

    A publicly-traded company is only required to disclose information concerning the amount and type of compensation paid to its CEO, CFO, and the three other most highly compensated executive officers in a given year. Information about compensation for these individuals may be unavailable in prior years if they were not in their current roles or did not qualify as among the most highly compensated officers at the time.

    We value your feedback. Let us know what you think.

    Site Directory Site Map Our Products

    Corrections Help Advertising Opportunities Licensing Opportunities Glossary RSS Mobile Portfolio Affiliate Careers

    International Sites: Australia Canada China France Germany Hong Kong Italy The Netherlands Norway Spain U.K. Switzerland

    Stocks by: Name | Ticker | Star Rating | Market Cap | Stock Type | Sector | Industry

    Mutual Funds by: Star Rating | Investment Style | Total Assets | Category | Top Holdings | Top Sectors | Symbol / Ticker | Name

    ETFs by: Star Rating | Category | Total Assets | Symbol / Ticker | Name

    Articles by: Title | Date | Author | Collection | Interest | Popularity

    Investment Categories by: Topic | Sector | Key Indicators | User Interest | Market Cap | Industry

    Premium Stocks by: Name | Ticker | Star Rating | Market Cap | Stock Type | Sector | Industry

    Premium Mutual Funds by: Star Rating | Investment Style | Total Assets | Category | Top Holdings | Top Sectors | Symbol / Ticker | Name

    Premium ETFs by: Star Rating | Category | Total Assets | Symbol / Ticker | Name

    Popular Articles by: Title | Date | Author | Collection | Interest | Popularity

    Popular Investment Categories by: Topic | Sector | Key Indicators | User Interest | Market Cap | Industry

    Independent. Insightful. Trusted. Morningstar provides stock market analysis; equity, mutual fund, and ETF research, ratings, and picks; portfolio tools; and option, hedge fund, IRA, 401k, and 529 plan research. Our reliable data and analysis can help both experienced enthusiasts and newcomers.



    © Copyright 2015 Morningstar, Inc. All rights reserved. Please read our Terms of Useand Privacy Policy.Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500, Nasdaq, and Morningstar Index (Market Barometer) quotes are real-time. Russell 2000 quote is 10 minutes delayed.

    NC Charter Chief Becomes Head Of Online Charter School

    Joel Medley meets with charter advisory board in his previous job as Director of the Office of Charter Schools.

    Credit Lisa Worf / WFAE

    Listen

    Listening…

    The Director of North Carolina’s Office of Charter Schools took a new job this week. He is now the head of an online charter school that won approval from the state board of education this year.

    It made us wonder what policies the state has to ensure public employees aren’t applying for jobs with the same groups they may be vetting or negotiating contracts with. There aren’t many.

    Joel Medley is now the Head of Schools for North Carolina Virtual Academy. But up until last week, he led the state’s Office of Charter Schools. It oversees all of the state’s charters and helps analyze applications of groups applying to become charter schools.

    That list of applications this year included the online charter Medley now leads. He’s actually an employee of K12 Inc., the for-profit company that manages the school. The group had applied before, but failed to make it through the process.

    State Board of Education Chairman Bill Cobey said Medley’s review of the school was thorough.

    “I know he scrutinized these as closely as possible and brought up all the possible criticisms and negatives during the process,” says Cobey.

    Medley helped review North Carolina Virtual Academy last October. His part of it did include some tough questions about how many students the group expects would withdraw and how the school would plan to deal with children with disabilities.

    State Board of Education members approved the school in February. They didn’t have much choice since state law established a pilot program for two online charters and only two applied.

    “I don’t think there’s anything that went on between him and K12 before this approval. In some cases you might suspect somebody, but not with Joel Medley, not at all,” says Cobey.

    Medley says he would never do that. He says he didn’t talk to K12 about a job, until he saw the post in April and it seemed like a good fit.

    “My wife and I had conversations about looking to get back to a principalship and, in the last few months, it just kind of happened,” says Medley.

    He says he didn’t tell his bosses he applied for the job, but they knew in general he was thinking about moving on.

    Situations like this leave too much up to trust says Jane Pinsky, Director of the North Carolina Coalition for Lobbying and Government Reform.

    “In many of these cases, people are not involved in something that’s malicious or wrong, but it does undermine citizen confidence and without citizen confidence our democracy doesn’t work,” says Pinsky.

    State law requires a six month cooling off period for lawmakers and certain high-level public employees who become lobbyists. But there isn’t anything like that for most public employees taking jobs in the areas they regulate or with companies or groups whose applications they may vet or whose contracts they may negotiate.

    State Superintendent June Atkinson doesn’t see conflict-of-interest concerns arising from Medley’s case.

    “He was not the deciding person as to which companies would get the charter,” says Atkinson.

    Some state agencies have conflict of interest policies that cover what are called “revolving door” situations. But many like the Department of Public Instruction don’t.

    Two years ago, a Department of Health and Human Services employee who helped oversee the rollout of a Medicaid billing system took a job with the company responsible for the massive project that had problem after problem. That prompted State Senator Jeff Tarte and others to introduce bills trying to put restrictions on these situations.

    “There needs to be appropriate steps followed to ensure even the perception of any impropriety is not present,” says Tarte.

    One such bill passed the Senate this year. It essentially places a six month cooling off period on any state employees who take jobs with companies they’re regulating or whose contracts they’re overseeing. It aims to do that by not allowing state departments to contract with any groups using these new employees to administer state contracts.