What a crock of shit.  The survey asked the parents.  Didn’t bother to check the test scores of the kids.  Of course the parents think their kids did great.  They got A’s when they used to get D’s and F’s.  People are such idiots.

ORVA (K12) Students:  Voted most likely to live off their parents for the rest of their lives.

94% of Oregon Virtual Academy Students Benefitted Academically From Curriculum in 2015-2016

August 31, 2016

(Graphic: Business Wire) Multimedia Gallery URL

PORTLAND, Ore.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Students at Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA), an accredited, full-time, online public charter school, will begin their 2016-2017 school year on September 6, as the program marks its ninth year of operation in the state. According to a spring 2016 survey conducted by Edge Research, 94% of the families with students enrolled in the school during the 2015-2016 school year felt that their child had benefitted academically from the curriculum.

This Smart News Release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160831006588/en/

ORVA is open to all students in grades K through 12 who reside in Oregon. The rigorous and engaging curriculum offered by the school includes courses in language arts/English, math, science, history, world languages, art and music, as well as elective and Advanced Placement® courses for high school students. State-certified teachers provide instruction, guidance and support, and interact with students and parents via email, web-based classrooms, online discussions, phone and face-to-face meetings. As a public school option, there is no tuition.

ORVA students receive a well-rounded education and one that prepares them for successes after high school,” said Brandy Osborn, Head of School of Oregon Virtual Academy. “We at ORVA are proud of our school, our teachers, staff, and students. ORVA is a great choice for families who are interested in being actively involved in their children’s education.”

Flexibility is a key benefit for ORVA students. The online school setting enables advanced learners to progress faster in subjects at which they excel, while students who need more time to grasp a concept can get that opportunity. Additionally, teachers develop a personalized learning plan for each student that is mapped to their individual educational goals.

ORVA is still accepting enrollments for this fall. For more information, visit the school’s website at www.k12.com/orva.

About Oregon Virtual Academy

Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA) is an online public charter school authorized by the North Bend School District and open to students in grades K through 12. As part of the Oregon public school system, ORVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about ORVA, visit www.k12.com/orva.

View source version on businesswire.com: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160831006588/en/

MULTIMEDIA AVAILABLE:http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160831006588/en/

What a crock of shit.  The survey asked the parents.  Didn’t bother to check the test scores of the kids.  Of course the parents think their kids did great.  They got A’s when they used to get D’s and F’s.  People are such idiots.

94% of Oregon Virtual Academy Students Benefitted Academically From Curriculum in 2015-2016

<i–< Students return to online public school September 6 —

August 31, 2016 07:28 PM Eastern Daylight Time

PORTLAND, Ore.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Students at Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA),an accredited, full-time, online public charter school, will begin their 2016-2017 school year on September 6, as the program marks its ninth year of operation in the state. According to a spring 2016 survey conducted by Edge Research, 94% of the families with students enrolled in the school during the 2015-2016 school year felt that their child had benefitted academically from the curriculum.

ORVA students head back to school on Sept. 6!

Tweet this

ORVA is open to all students in grades K through 12 who reside in Oregon. The rigorous and engaging curriculum offered by the school includes courses in language arts/English, math, science, history, world languages, art and music, as well as elective and Advanced Placement® courses for high school students. State-certified teachers provide instruction, guidance and support, and interact with students and parents via email, web-based classrooms, online discussions, phone and face-to-face meetings. As a public school option, there is no tuition.

“ORVA students receive a well-rounded education and one that prepares them for successes after high school,” said Brandy Osborn, Head of School of Oregon Virtual Academy. “We at ORVA are proud of our school, our teachers, staff, and students. ORVA is a great choice for families who are interested in being actively involved in their children’s education.”

Flexibility is a key benefit for ORVA students. The online school setting enables advanced learners to progress faster in subjects at which they excel, while students who need more time to grasp a concept can get that opportunity. Additionally, teachers develop a personalized learning plan for each student that is mapped to their individual educational goals.

ORVA is still accepting enrollments for this fall. For more information, visit the school’s website at www.k12.com/orva.

About Oregon Virtual Academy

Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA) is an online public charter school authorized by the North Bend School District and open to students in grades K through 12. As part of the Oregon public school system, ORVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about ORVA, visit www.k12.com/orva.

Contacts

Team Soapbox
Anne Heavey, 206-528-2550
anne@teamsoapbox.com

Online School Students’ First Day of School is at Home

<i–< Idaho Technical Career Academy students return to online public
school September 6 —

August 30, 2016 05:50 PM Eastern Daylight Time

MERIDIAN, Idaho–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Students across the state of Idaho in grades K-12 will be returning to
school this fall in the comfort of their own home, having chosen to
attend the full-time, tuition-free, online public school, Idaho
Technical Career Academy (ITCA). ITCA has been operating in Idaho since
2014.

First day of school for ITCA students is September 6!

Tweet this

ITCA is the state’s only career-technical education online public
charter school serving students in grades 9 through 12. Students have
the opportunity to explore four program options in key industries of
growth in the state: Business Administration, Automated Manufacturing,
Web Design, and Healthcare. The goal of ITCA is to develop a sequence of
instruction that teaches students occupational skills while ultimately
providing a pathway to job opportunities or to a technical college
program upon graduation.

The online school setting enables students in any geographic area of the
state to utilize this unique curriculum. Furthermore, the flexible
learning environment enables students to partner with professionals and
companies to apply the skills they are learning in a specific industry.

ITCA uses the award-winning K12 online curriculum to offer students in
grades K–12 an exceptional learning experience. The innovative
curriculum and technology, combined with a strong partnership between
families and teachers, creates an opportunity for teachers to focus on
each student’s academic needs, and gives a growing number of students a
powerful educational option to reach their true potential.

“ITCA is a new and exciting school option for kids in Idaho,” said Monti
Pittman, Head of School for ITCA. “The focus on career and technical
skill sets – combined with the commitment and passion of our staff –
provides our students with an amazing learning experience.”

Teachers for ITCA are Idaho-credentialed and provide instruction,
guidance and support, and interact with students and parents via email,
web-based classrooms, online discussions, phone and face-to-face
meetings.

ITCA is accepting enrollments for this fall. To learn more about
enrollment requirements visit http://itca.k12.com/.

About Idaho Technical Career Academy

Idaho Technical Career Academy (ITCA) is a full-time online public
school program that serves students in grades 9 through 12 statewide. As
part of the Idaho public school system, ITCA is tuition-free, giving
parents and families the choice to access the award-winning curriculum
and tools provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN),
the nation’s largest provider of proprietary curriculum and online
education programs. For more information about ITCA, visit http://itca.k12.com/.

Contacts

Team SoapboxAnne Heavey, 206-528-2550anne@teamsoapbox.com

Online schools: Susan Bonilla shelves bill after interest groups water it down

Former California Virtual Academies student Elizabeth Novak-Galloway, 12, plays a video game on her laptop in her home in San Francisco on.
Dai Sugano — Bay Area News Group

By Jessica Calefati, Bay Area News Group

Posted:
08/30/16, 8:09 PM PDT

Updated: 4 hrs ago

0 Comments

California Virtual Academies teacher Julianne Knapp teaches her students during her online class on at a public library in San Jose.
Dai Sugano — Bay Area News Group

SACRAMENTO >> Legislation that originally sought to ban online charter schools from hiring for-profit firms to provide management or instructional services stalled Wednesday in the state Senate almost two weeks after the author substantially amended and watered down the measure.

Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, a Concord Democrat, introduced Assembly Bill 1084 in response to the Mercury News’ investigation of K12 Inc., the publicly traded Virginia company behind a profitable but low-performing network of “virtual” academies serving about 15,000 students across the state.

The legislation cleared the Senate Education Committee in June on a party line 6-2 vote after a spirited debate about the role private companies should play in public education.

But substantial opposition from the company whose operations she sought to rein in and disagreement between the state’s largest teachers union and an influential charter schools advocacy group about the bill’s goals forced Bonilla to modify its language, removing all references to rules for online schools.

In an interview Tuesday, Bonilla said she carried the bill to ensure that public money for schools is used to educate students, not to enrich corporate shareholders. She said she also had hoped the legislation would boost online schools’ accountability. In the end, however, even the stripped-down version drew unexpected opposition from a school employees union and Republican lawmakers and had to be shelved.

“The bill started out targeting online charter schools because that is where we have witnessed this problem most,” said Bonilla, who is leaving the Legislature this year because of term limits. But “as we delved deeper into the details, it became apparent that because of the complex structures of these organizations, getting to the bad actors would be challenging.”

The newspaper’s stories revealed that K12 reaps tens of millions of dollars annually in state funding while graduating fewer than half of its high school students and that kids who spend as little as one minute during a school day logged onto K12’s software may be counted as “present” in records used to calculate the amount of funding the schools get from the state.

The two-part series also showed that the online schools are not really independent from K12, as the company claims. The academies’ contracts, tax records and other financial information suggest that K12 calls the shots, operating the schools to make money by taking advantage of laws governing charter schools and nonprofit organizations.

In the months since the newspaper published its findings, state Controller Betty Yee launched an audit of the K12-managed California Virtual Academies. And following a probe by the state Attorney General’s Office, K12 agreed to a $168.5 million settlement with the state over claims it manipulated attendance records and overstated its students’ success.

A spokesman for K12 could not be reached for comment on Bonilla’s decision to shelve AB 1084. But an analysis of the legislation prepared by Senate staff members shows the company didn’t oppose the latest version of the measure, which would have required all charter schools to operate as nonprofits.

The reason is that since K12 is technically a “vendor” of the schools it controls, its operations in California wouldn’t have been impacted by the measure at all.

In the weeks since the Senate Education Committee’s hearing on the bill, Bonilla had been working closely with the California Teachers Association and the California Charter Schools Association to craft bill language that satisfied both powerful interest groups. And although the groups agree that for-profit companies like K12 shouldn’t be allowed to run charter schools in this state, they disagreed on strategy.

“We tried for weeks to negotiate something with Ms. Bonilla,” said Jed Wallace, the charter group’s executive director. “What we were trying to do was related, but different.”

The union wanted to keep Bonilla’s original concept of a broad ban. But the charter group supported a more “surgical approach” that would have prohibited companies from having any role in the selection, interview or appointment of a charter school’s board members; barred them from developing, proposing or approving a school’s annual budget or expenditures; and limited the number of teachers the firm could employ or manage directly.

The version of the legislation Bonilla abandoned Wednesday was the result of “compromise” between the two groups, she said, adding that she hopes another lawmaker committed to charter school accountability picks up next year where she left off.

“(My work) sets a firm baseline from which to pursue further legislative fixes in the future,” Bonilla said.

Subscribe to Home Delivery and SAVE!

Online schools: Bay Area Assemblywoman shelves bill after interest groups water it down

By Jessica Calefati, jcalefati@bayareanewsgroup.com

Posted:
 
08/31/2016 04:29:04 AM PDT

SACRAMENTO — Legislation that originally sought to ban online charter schools from hiring for-profit firms to provide management or instructional services stalled Wednesday in the state Senate almost two weeks after the author substantially amended and watered down the measure.

Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, a Concord Democrat, introduced Assembly Bill 1084 in response to this newspaper’s investigation of K12 Inc., the publicly traded Virginia company behind a profitable but low-performing network of “virtual” academies serving about 15,000 students across the state.

The legislation cleared the Senate Education Committee in June on a party line 6-2 vote after a spirited debate about the role private companies should play in public education.

File photo: Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, a Concord Democrat, introduced Assembly Bill 1084 in response to this newspaper’s investigation of K12 Inc. (Bay Area News Group archives)

But substantial opposition from the company whose operations she sought to rein in and disagreement between the state’s largest teachers union and an influential charter schools advocacy group about the bill’s goals forced Bonilla to modify its language, removing all references to rules for online schools.

In an interview Tuesday, Bonilla said she carried the bill to ensure that public money for schools is used to educate students, not to enrich corporate shareholders. She said she also had hoped the legislation would boost online schools’ accountability. In the end, however, even the stripped-down version drew unexpected opposition from a school employees union and Republican lawmakers and had to be shelved.

“The bill started out targeting online charter schools because that is where we have witnessed this problem most,” said Bonilla, who is leaving the Legislature this year because of term limits. But “as we delved deeper into the details, it became apparent that because of the complex structures of these organizations, getting to the bad actors would be challenging.”

The newspaper’s stories revealed that K12 reaps tens of millions of dollars annually in state funding while graduating fewer than half of its high school students and that kids who spend as little as one minute during a school day logged onto K12’s software may be counted as “present” in records used to calculate the amount of funding the schools get from the state.

The two-part series also showed that the online schools are not really independent from K12, as the company claims. The academies’ contracts, tax records and other financial information suggest that K12 calls the shots, operating the schools to make money by taking advantage of laws governing charter schools and nonprofit organizations.

In the months since the newspaper published its findings, state Controller Betty Yee launched an audit of the K12-managed California Virtual Academies. And following a probe by the state attorney general’s office, K12 agreed to a $168.5 million settlement with the state over claims it manipulated attendance records and overstated its students’ success.

A spokesman for K12 could not be reached for comment on Bonilla’s decision to shelve AB 1084. But an analysis of the legislation prepared by Senate staff shows the company didn’t oppose the latest version of the measure, which would have required all charter schools to operate as nonprofits.

The reason is that since K12 is technically a “vendor” of the schools it controls, its operations in California wouldn’t have been impacted by the measure at all.

In the weeks since the Senate Education Committee’s hearing on the bill, Bonilla had been working closely with the California Teachers Association and the California Charter Schools Association to craft bill language that satisfied both powerful interest groups. And although the groups agree that for-profit companies like K12 shouldn’t be allowed to run charter schools in this state, they disagreed on strategy.

“We tried for weeks to negotiate something with Ms. Bonilla,” said Jed Wallace, the charter group’s executive director. “What we were trying to do was related but different.”

The union wanted to keep Bonilla’s original concept of a broad ban. But the charter group supported a more “surgical approach” that would have prohibited companies from having any role in the selection, interview or appointment of a charter school’s board members; barred them from developing, proposing or approving a school’s annual budget or expenditures; and limited the number of teachers the firm could employ or manage directly.

The version of the legislation Bonilla abandoned Wednesday was the result of “compromise” between the two groups, she said, adding that she hopes another lawmaker committed to charter school accountability picks up next year where she left off.

“(My work) sets a firm baseline from which to pursue further legislative fixes in the future,” Bonilla said.

Contact Jessica Calefati at 916-441-2101. Follow her at Twitter.com/Calefati.

Maine Virtual Academy Celebrates Start of 2016-2017 School Year

Statewide online school welcomes students back on August 29th

August 26, 2016 04:02 PM Eastern Daylight Time

AUGUSTA, Maine–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Maine Virtual Academy (MEVA),a statewide online public charter
school, will begin the 2016-2017 school year on August 29. As an online
public school program authorized by the Maine Charter School Commission,
MEVA is tuition-free for students in grades 7-12 who reside anywhere in
the state.

The first day of school for MEVA students is August 29!

Tweet this

MEVA incorporates online lessons and instruction from highly qualified,
Maine-licensed teachers who monitor student progress, provide
professional insight, and work in partnership with parents. Teachers
communicate with students and parents via phone, email and the online
classroom technology in order to provide an individualized approach that
helps prepare students for post-graduation career or college success.

“At Maine Virtual Academy we ensure the success of our students through
a dedicated approach to individualized education,” said Dr. Melinda
Browne, Head of School of Maine Virtual Academy. “Our teachers work
closely with students and their families to develop an individual
learning plan, which allows each student to work at their own pace and
meet his or her academic goals. We have an exciting year ahead of us and
look forward to our students’ continued success both in class and in the
MEVA community.”

Students can chose from a diverse middle school and high school K12catalog
of courses, including many electives that are not offered in traditional
schools. Students have the freedom to progress through lessons at their
own pace, while receiving quality instruction, support, and individual
attention from teachers. The school also offers clubs, school outings,
dances and other activities to foster community.

MEVA students receive instruction from their teachers during live,
interactive online classes, as well as through recorded sessions.
Teachers are also available to students and their Learning Coachesvia
email, phone and one-on-one online instruction.

MEVA is authorized by the Maine Charter School Commission and is
governed by an independent, non-profit board of directors. The school’s
team of educators and school leaders are based at the school’s
administrative headquarters. Interested families are encouraged to visit meva.k12.com
for more information on the school and how to enroll.

About Maine Virtual Academy

Maine Virtual Academy (MEVA) is a full-time online public school program
that serves students in grades 7 through 12. Authorized by the Maine
Charter School Commission, MEVA is available tuition-free to students in
the state of Maine and utilizes the award-winning curriculum from K12
Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s largest provider of proprietary
curriculum and online education programs for grades K-12. For more
information about MEVA, visit meva.k12.com.

Contacts

Maine Virtual Academy (MEVA)Donna Savarese, 703-436-3273dsavarese@k12.com

Students Head Back to School by Staying Home

<i–< School begins August 29 for online public school students

August 25, 2016 04:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time

SIMI VALLEY, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Local students in the areas of Kern, Inyo, Santa Barbara and San
Bernardino will begin their first day of the 2016-17 school year on
August 29 from the comfort of their own homes, choosing to attend the
full-time, tuition-free, online public charter school California Virtual
Academy @ Maricopa (CAVA @ Maricopa).

CAVA @ Maricopa is one of 10 independent charter schools in California
that uses the K12
online curriculum
 to offer students in grades K–12 a unique learning
experience. The virtual school setting allows both advanced learners and
those students who need additional assistance the support to find the
individualized learning experience they seek. The K12 online
curriculum enables teachers, parents and the students to build an
individualized learning plan, and provides support and flexibility in
the structure of the school setting.

“The students that enroll in California Virtual Academy @ Maricopa seek
a personalized learning experience that enables them to excel and
explore their own learning style,” said Kimberly Odom, Director of
Special Education. “Each student receives quality instruction and
support in a one-on-one setting as they grow throughout the year.”

Additionally, the schools offer a unique program called Community Day
that combines the best of online learning with weekly face-to-face
interaction. During Community Days students receive instruction from
teachers in math and language arts and participate in various other
educational activities, such as PE and science fairs, while parents
receive support and network with other parents.

CAVA @ Maricopa is still accepting enrollment of students for the
2016-2017 school year. In-person and online information sessions are
being held throughout the month.

For a complete list of back to school events and information sessions or
to learn more about enrolling, visit http://cava.k12.com
or call (866) 339-6787.

California Virtual Academy @ Maricopa

California Virtual Academy @ Maricopa is a tuition-free, online public
schools serving students in K-12 who are residents of Kern, Inyo, Santa
Barbara and San Bernardino counties. California-credentialed teachers
deliver lessons in an online classroom platform provided by K12 Inc.
(NYSE: LRN) with a combination of engaging online and offline
coursework—including a wide variety of books, CDs, videos, and hands-on
materials that are delivered to the student and make learning come
alive. Common household items and office supplies such as printer ink
and paper are not provided. California Virtual Academy @ Maricopa
provides opportunities for advanced learners, and prepares students to
be college and career ready at graduation. Learn more at http://cava.k12.com.

Contacts

Team SoapboxAnne Heavey, 206-528-2550anne@teamsoapbox.com

Homeschooling more ‘affordable and flexible’ for many parents in UAE

Education starts at home

Education and the costs attached to it is a hot topic in the UAE.

With fees rising year on year, many parents question whether their children are getting the correct level of learning for the money they are shelling out. But what’s the option? Homeschooling appears to be one avenue that is growing in popularity.

According to Ekta Dhameja, digital marketer at K12 Middle East, the number of UAE families choosing home education is increasing as “parents are taking a more active role in their child’s education”. Other reasons, she says, are affordability, flexibility and tailored learning.

Diane Menzies is a mum of four. She says her two eldest kids adapted well into the UAE school system, but it wasn’t the same for her younger ones, so they gave homeschooling a try. That was seven years ago. Now, they are in high school and happy with the progress they have made.

“Their academic grades have risen, their confidence and self-esteem are far higher,” Diane says. “We have decided to homeschool them until both graduate as I think the brick and mortar schools here have become far too expensive and the teaching support is just not there.”

Diane’s kids are enrolled in K12 – an online American curriculum school fully accredited and licensed by the KHDA. It currently has 700 students enrolled across the GCC.

So what are the benefits of homeschooling? Diane says: “They don’t have to sit at a desk the whole day, my daughter can often be found lounging on a bean bag in her sleepwear doing her school work. We also get one-on-one teaching from subject teachers, which is a huge help for kids who need extra support. I also found that much of the brick and mortar school days were filled with non-academic activities, book week, practising for plays and dress up days. Although this is good for the children I do think that it takes up too much time. We still have fun days, but academics is the main focus.”

With costs rising, parents are crunching numbers and, while it isn’t free, they see homeschooling as an affordable option. In K12, the tuition fee from kindergarten to grade eight is Dhs18,332 per annum.

Diane says she is saving about Dhs80,000 in school and extra fees: “We don’t have to buy uniform or school shoes, we don’t pay for trips or extra activities.”

But about the social disadvantage of having the kids at home? This is a misconception, according to K12’s Ekta, who says: “We organise monthly trips/excursions and these are available to homeschooled students as well as students studying in the Learning Centre at Dubai Knowledge Village.”

Diane also feels a social classroom environment can be distracting. She adds: “I may sound harsh but the main reason a lot of children can’t concentrate is due to the noisy and busy environment of a classroom. “Both of my children are social, my daughter will happily go up to someone new and say hi.”

RELATED: A third of UAE parents looking to switch child’s school

But studying at home is not at easy, as some would think. They say hard work, commitment and dedication from both parent and child are needed. “The main challenge is getting them up in the morning and keeping them on schedule, I have to be very organised to ensure that work is handed in when it is due,” Diane says.

Mum Jenny also homeschooled her son for three years. “It can sometimes be hard to separate being a mom and being a teacher. He did not have the option of coming home from school and complaining about his teacher,” she quips. Her daughter, on the other hand, was never homeschooled.

But in the debate between homeschool vs traditional school, the important thing is providing quality education for the child. This year, Jenny is enrolling her son back to regular school. She feels this is the best for him as he now enters the fourth grade. “Each child is different, and each year is a new start to evaluate what is best for that child at that time. As with most things there are advantages and disadvantages to both. I loved homeschooling, but I am looking forward to hopefully being a really supportive parent to the teachers my children will have this year.”

Tell us your views at @7DAYSUAE and take our poll on homeschooling at 7days.ae

glaiza@7days.ae

More from Education


How to keep your child safe from cyberbullying

With nearly 60 per cent of UAE students admitting to the presence of cyberbullying among peers (according to a study by UAE-based branch ICDL), a ma..


Living in the edutainment age

As the summer comes to an end, it will be tough to pry the kids away from the gadgets that have kept them company throughout the holidays. But educato..


Tips for a smarter start to a new term

Clarion School Dubai give their tips for a stress-free back-to-school Transitioning from nursery to the “big school” As sleep is so important for ..

K12 Inc. to Present at BMO Capital Markets 16th Annual Back To School Conference

August 18, 2016 11:39 AM Eastern Daylight Time

HERNDON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), a technology-based education company and leading
provider of proprietary curriculum and online school programs for
students in pre-K through high school, today announced that it will be
presenting at the 16th Annual BMO Capital Markets Back To School
Conference. The event will take place on Thursday, September 15, 2016
and will be held at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York, NY.

K12 joins the online learning community on that day in marking the
first-ever National Online Learning Day (http://www.onlinelearningday.com).
The community of online learners is rapidly growing as student and
teacher engagement expands beyond the boundaries of traditional
learning. Online learning opens up new avenues of exploration and is
available to all learners, from pre-school to college and beyond.
Students can study almost any subject- anywhere, anytime. National
Online Learning Day is dedicated to showcasing the accomplishments of
online students and educators.

Stuart Udell, K12’s Chief Executive Officer will be presenting at 3:45
p.m. Eastern and both he, and James Rhyu, Chief Financial Officer will
be hosting meetings with institutional investors throughout the day. If
you wish to schedule a meeting with the Company, please contact your BMO
Capital Markets representative or Mike Kraft, Vice President Finance.

About K12 Inc.

K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN)
is driving innovation and advancing the quality of education by
delivering state-of-the-art, digital learning platforms and technology
to students and school districts across the globe. K12’s award winning
curriculum serves over 2,000 schools and school districts and has
delivered more than four million courses over the past decade. K12 is a
company of educators with the nation’s largest network of K-12 online
school teachers, providing instruction, academic services, and learning
solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms,
blended school programs, and directly to families. The K12program
is offered through K12partner public schools in 33
states and the District of Columbia, and through private schools serving
students in all 50 states and more than 100 countries. More information
can be found at K12.com.

Contacts

K12 Inc.Investor and Press Contact:Mike Kraft,
571-353-7778VP Financemkraft@k12.com

Odd commentary considering the writer is working for the company who screws up kids. 

An election year when school choice is ignored

By Nate Davis, contributor    

Getty Images

It’s bad enough that during two straight weeks of Republican and Democratic conventions, we never really grasped a true sense of what newly nominated presidential contenders would do to improve the uncertain state of K-12 education in America.

Worse — especially since then — is that we have yet to see a solid reform-driven or innovation-focused commitment from candidates as the solution to our education crisis. A sorely needed exchange on parental choice and access to creative online learning platforms is, perhaps, the most significant missing policy deep-dive since the presidential cycle began in earnest over a year ago. For the most part, presidential candidates have steered clear of any focus on choice in K-12 as a main prescription to constant problems plaguing our school systems and challenging our kids.

That’s unfortunate, since parents are voters, too.

It is rather mysterious considering the sheer size, cost and long-term destructive impact of the K-12 crisis. Yet, as candidates on the campaign trail bludgeoned each other over everything from salacious tweets, badly placed emails and hand sizes, little is said on how policymakers could intervene to save the nation’s struggling elementary, middle and high-school students. The intervention is clearly found in school districts embracing new, progressive education models that meet the needs of future societies and workforces — models such as blended experiential and online learning in and, yes, outside the conventional classroom. Models, such as charter schools, that offer parents the options they need to ensure their child’s success in an increasingly competitive global environment.

That battle is no more urgent for any group than it is for our nation’s most underserved and historically distressed: from black and Latino youth to low-income and struggling working-class communities already battered by the effects (and after-effects) of recession. The last thing already economically challenged black or brown students and their parents should worry about is the quality of their education.

Likewise, those high-achieving students, rural students, bullied students and others are desperate for choices that allow them to excel in their education. For example: I met a student from West Virginia last week who enrolled in online courses that she could not take in her local, excellent but small neighborhood school. She and her parents were told by the guidance counselor that the courses she wanted were unavailable. The eventual valedictorian for her class, she took additional courses from a for-profit online provider that allowed her to achieve higher SAT scores and take courses otherwise unavailable to her. There were even language courses available that she would otherwise only take in college. Without choice, this high-achieving student — like hundreds of thousands of others — would not continue to excel and would be limited in what local schools could offer.

Clearly, you can’t have a conversation about improving the quality of life for underserved, diverse populations or high-achieving students unless you pose workable ideas on education. You can’t pose workable ideas on education or expect the condition of underserved youth to improve if you refuse to put school choice and access to new modes of learning in the mix.

Major openings for the presidential candidates to discuss choice and online education as a primary learning tool are either conveniently dismissed, lost in political posturing or altogether forgotten. We clearly can’t rely on the articulation of a policy vision from the Republican nominee (for obvious reasons). But when we look to Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonEx-GM CEO: I’ve always voted Republican until now Election reveals Paul Ryan to be worst speaker in U.S. history Dem Senate candidate knocks Rubio for Trump support MORE for a thoughtful approach on issues such as parental choice, we find her either taking the side of unionized teachers (even if it contradicts earlier, steadfast support for charter schools) or completely missing those grand opportunities to present it as a viable long-term beacon of educational hope.

Nowhere was that unfortunate oversight on vivid display than at her recent appearance before a joint meeting of the National Association of Black Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. When offered a few moments to lay out her policy vision for black and brown progress in America, Clinton left out school choice and relegated digital learning to merely PCs in the classroom.

Nor did the assemblage of esteemed African-American and Latino reporters, talk-show hosts, editors and producers ask her about it.

Unfortunately, online, radio and cable outlets are so focused on the latest campaign gaffe or doubled down faux pas that the plight of school children gets left behind in the political dust-up.

Still, campaigns refuse any raised or sustained debate on choice as a tangible way to address our ongoing K-12 crisis with any tangible solutions. Few want to take a firm position supporting parental preference in education, despite the vast number of voting parents who want (and need) it. Most seem oblivious to the need for expanded and innovative options for K-12 students, despite an abundance of evidence suggesting online learning, blended classrooms and access to multifaceted educational environments are exactly what’s essential for an increasingly diverse American landscape.

Yet, when examining many of the larger national polls, parents — especially black and Latino parents — are demanding more choice and creative, digital learning in and outside the classroom. In a National Alliance for Public Charter Schools poll released this year, 80 percent of parents supported some form of educational choice, including 63 percent of black parents and 55 percent of Hispanic parents. A Pathways/YouGov survey on school preferences found that black and Hispanic parents were "more likely" to consider "integrated use of technology" when education options were available.

For these population groups, education is perceived as the most effective pathway to upward socioeconomic mobility. The Pew Research Center shows that 66 percent of Americans identify education as a top 10 issue motivating choices this election cycle. In the most recent weekly YouGov/Economist survey, education still ranks among the top-five issues (out of 15), with more African-Americans and Latinos placing it as a "most important issue" than whites. For voters under 30, education is the top concern (partly out of struggles over student debt, and partly out of recent experiences with troubled school systems). That aligns with a recent GenForward joint poll where education was a top-three concern for voters ages 18 to 30, especially voters of color.

This is not much of a surprise. Education is a greater priority to individuals who find themselves historically disadvantaged or farther down the income ladder. To those faced with fewer resources and access to wealth, education is increasingly respected as the ultimate driver of future success — and choice is a chief path to that goal. Yet, presidential nominees and their parties have failed to promote a vision of what will make K-12 education better, even as the shifting demographic environment continues to demand such.

That school choice is not a headlining issue of our time rests not on the shoulders of voters. Elected officials, policymakers, pundits and those who constitute the rest of our active political and media class must aggressively tackle that discussion. We need a debate and movement where educational options are plentiful and innovation in (and outside) the classroom is the norm rather than the exception.

Davis is executive chairman of K12 Inc., a technology-based education company and leading provider of online learning programs to schools across the U.S.

The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the views of The Hill.