Idaho School District Wins 2016 Fuel Education™ Transformation Award

Bonneville Joint School District recognized for innovative use of online learning to address students’ individual needs

08:30 ET
from Fuel Education

HERNDON, Va., May 11, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Not all students excel in a traditional brick-and-mortar school. Whether a student is home or hospital-bound because of a chronic illness, has behavioral or learning challenges, or has other unique needs, they still need access to high-quality education. The Bonneville Online School, in Idaho’s Bonneville Joint School District, uses the power of online learning to address the needs of its students outside of the traditional education environment.

Personalized learning solutions provider Fuel Education™ (FuelEd™) has named Bonneville Online School (BOS) its 2016 Transformation Award winner. Schools and districts using FuelEd solutions were encouraged to submit success stories to demonstrate how they have used innovative online or blended learning programs to transform education for their students. Bonneville was selected from dozens of entries for providing K–8 students with a flexible school structure that enables them to have a successful academic experience from home.

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“We are very pleased to honor Bonneville Online School as an outstanding example of how school districts can use online and blended learning to help students overcome education barriers,” said Gregg Levin, General Manager of Fuel Education. “Fuel Educations primary goal is to help our school and district partners to personalize learning for each student—regardless of their personal circumstance—so they can achieve their academic goals.”

When 9-year-old Gabe enrolled at BOS in fall 2015, he had been diagnosed with ADHD and dyslexia, and had been exhibiting behavioral issues with his principal and teacher at his previous brick-and-mortar school. Gabe started working on his FuelEd courses at grade level, but his learning coach—his mother—immediately realized his skill levels were well below grade level. With the support of his teacher, a modifiable curriculum, and his learning coach, Gabe is now a dramatically different student. He is confident and enthusiastic about school and puts in the extra effort needed to stay on track, even working on some Saturday mornings and school vacation days. Gabe has pride in his accomplishments and sees himself as an online, at-home learner until he graduates.

Gabe is just one of the more than 100 students enrolled in BOS. BOS was founded in 2010 at the request of a group of local parents who wanted an in-district online school that offered a curriculum approved by the superintendent. Students have the flexibility to complete FuelEd courses at their own pace with guidance from a learning coach and one of BOS’ three teachers. BOS takes an innovative approach to the mastery of content. If students score between 70-79 percent on an end-of-lesson test, students review missed questions with their learning coach to prove they know the material instead of retaking the test. For instructional support, teachers and students connect via phone, email, text, Class Connects and Google Hangouts for one-to-one or group instruction. Every Thursday, students can attend an optional face-to-face session with their teachers and peers.

BOS measures student success based on their participation in Thursday sessions, the level of direct communication with teachers, and growth and proficiency assessments. Nearly 60 percent of students attend the optional Thursday sessions. Students and their learning coaches are in almost constant communication with teachers.

The 2016 FuelEd Transformation Award submissions represented districts with diverse demographic, economic, and geographic backgrounds and identified specific challenges such as increasing graduation rates, providing flexible scheduling, and differentiating instruction for at-risk students. Despite their different backgrounds and goals, each district was able to use FuelEd’s digital curriculum to effectively address these challenges.

To read more about BOS and their program, as well as past FuelEd Transformation Award winners, visit www.getfueled.com/resources-results/transformation-awards.

About Fuel Education
Fuel Education™ partners with school districts to fuel personalized learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through 12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform, PEAK™, enables teachers to customize courses using their own content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open educational resources. Fuel Education offers the industry’s largest catalog of K–12 digital curriculum, certified instruction, professional development, and educational services. FuelEd has helped 2,000 school districts to improve student outcomes and better serve diverse student populations. To learn more, visitgetfueled.com and Twitter.

©2016 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education and FuelEd are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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K12 Inc. Names Stuart Udell, Former Catapult Learning Official, as CEO

Major online education provider K12 Inc., a favorite target of critics of the for-profit school industry, has named former Catapult Learning official Stuart J. Udell as its CEO.

Udell replaces Nate Davis, who K12 said would remain connected to the Herndon, Va.-based company by serving as executive chairman of its board of directors.

K12 Inc. has weathered a tumultuous period of changes over the past few years. Its enrollment numbers and overall performance have disappointed investors. This week the company’s stock was trading at $10 a share, down from $16.53 a year ago and $36.78 a little over two years ago.

In 2014 K12 suffered a big blow when the 10,800-student Agora Cyber Charter School in Pennsylvania ditched the private management company in favor of managing its own operations.

That same year K12 rebranded a number of its resources under a separate legal entity called Fuel Education, focusing on “personalized learning” platforms, as well as consulting, teacher professional development, and online courses.

Udell most recently served as CEO of Catapult Learning Inc., a commercial provider of instructional services and professional development, and an operator of schools. On its website, Catapult Learning describes itself as the largest provider of contracted K-12 services in the United States.

In July, Catapult Learning, which provides Title I and dropout-prevention services, announced that it would merge with Special Educational Services Inc., an operator of alternative schools. Combined, the companies said they would serve 300,000 students through direct instruction and proprietary technology programs.

Udell nearly doubled Catapult Learning’s revenue during his tenure, K12 said in a statement. He also worked for 11 years at Kaplan, at one point serving as president of Kaplan K12 Learning Services, building the organization’s school division, according to biographical information released by K12. From 1997-2001, he also served as president of the School Renaissance Institute, a subsidiary of Renaissance Learning focused on training, publishing, and research. He came back to Renaissance Learning in 2012, and served on its board of directors until 2014.

Davis said Udell’s “depth of experience and track record of success in education uniquely qualifies him to lead K12 and continue the progress we’ve made in improving academic outcomes, and preparing a new generation of students to succeed.”

Critics have pointed to the poor academic performance of students enrolled in K12 students on some states‘ tests, compared to those of students enrolled in regular public schools. They have also questioned the organization’s business practices, accusing it of focusing on aggressive marketing and recruitment rather than academic improvement. K12 officials have countered that their schools provide a valuable option for families whose children have struggled in traditional academic settings, and that comparisons between their schools and regular public schools don’t factor in the differences in the populations they serve,  or students’ different academic circumstances.


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Follow @EdWeekSCavanagh and @EdMarketBrief for the latest news on industry and innovation in education.

Colorado Hybrid School Takes Students to New Heights with FuelEd Curriculum, Combining In-Class and At-Home, Online Instruction



HERNDON, Va., Sept. 9, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — At Poudre School District Global Academy (PGA), an innovative hybrid school in Fort Collins, Colorado, students attend blended classes on campus and take online courses from home, and what they are achieving is extraordinary. Scores for grades 2-8 in math and reading on year-to-year Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) assessments show 140 to 240 percent growth, with the highest scores in grades 6-8—when students typically see a slight decline.  

In this K-12 school serving almost 200 students, the successes don't end there. The number of high school students being held back a grade dropped in the 2014-15 school year by nearly two-thirds—from 19 down to 7. And, the high school completion rate for secondary classes as well as college-credit bearing courses soared as well through PGA's concurrent enrollment program with local colleges.

PGA partners with Fuel Education™ (FuelEd™), which provides personalized learning solutions designed to enable schools and districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Using FuelEd online curriculum and content, PGA students work at their own pace at home three days per week, and attend teacher-led classes on campus the other two days each week.

The FuelEd curriculum is tailored to each student's unique needs, and allows for integration of teacher-created content. "Our teachers are rock stars," said Heather Hiebsch, PGA principal. "They look at the data to see what the students are mastering and where they have gaps. It's not 'What do I plan to teach today?' but rather 'What do these individual students need to learn today?'"

For the core courses, PGA employs its own local teachers, who oversee instruction for students whether learning at home or at school. For the elective courses offered through FuelEd, PGA uses FuelEd's certified instructors.

"FuelEd really listens to us," said Hiebsch. "I can tell them that I want to try something or that I think something is coming next, and I have their ear. They are flexible and responsive to what we want and need."

In addition to the high quality online curriculum and dedicated educators, Hiebsch attributes PGA's success to the hybrid learning model, parental involvement, and "the community we've built," she said.

Since opening in 2009 as a credit recovery and dropout prevention school, PGA has transformed into a small, personalized school serving a mix of former homeschoolers and students coming from traditional schools. Their learning needs are as diverse as in any traditional school—from those with learning disabilities to those seeking Advanced Placement (AP®) courses.

PGA students consider the hybrid model "the best of both worlds," said Hiebsch. "They're in charge, going it on their own, but they also have social connection and one-on-one help from teachers." In the past, students would attend PGA for a year while working on something else that was happening in their lives, she said. "Now we are attracting a broad range of students and have more kids returning every year. We even have a wait list at all grade levels, which says it all."

Gregg Levin, FuelEd general manager, said, "It is an honor to partner with the outstanding educators at Poudre School District Global Academy in delivering content and instruction for its winning hybrid learning model. PGA's success truly demonstrates how dedication and innovation can change student outcomes."

Since the school opened, more than 500 PGA students have used Fuel Education curriculum. In addition, each school year about 500 students at other Poudre School District schools take supplemental online courses, such as AP courses, world languages and electives, provided by FuelEd.

About Fuel EducationFuel Education partners with school districts to fuel personalized learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for preK-12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform, PEAK, enables teachers to customize courses using their own content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open educational resources. Fuel Education offers the industry's largest catalog of digital curriculum, certified instruction, professional development, and educational services. FuelEd has helped 2,000 school districts to improve student outcomes and better serve diverse student populations. To learn more, visit getfueled.com and Twitter.

©2015 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education and FuelEd are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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SOURCE Fuel Education

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K12 Inc. Report Shows Achievement Gains At Wisconsin Virtual Academy

HERNDON, Va., June 23, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – K12 Inc., America's leading provider of K-12 online school programs, released a new report highlighting how a community of educators, students, and families working together to build strong relationships can drive strong academic performance at Wisconsin Virtual Academy (WIVA). WIVA is a statewide online public charter school authorized by McFarland School District, serving students in kindergarten through high school.

The full report can be found here.

“In this report, we describe the academic performance and positive gains at WIVA, a mature and pioneering institute in the national network of online public schools managed by K12,” said Dr. Margaret Jorgensen, K12 Chief Academic Officer. “After analyzing the academic data, we highlight the school's focus on building relations between teachers and students to individualize learning experiences. We also share how unique relationships among educators lead to shared best practices in virtual learning environments.”

Since 2011, WIVA's enrollment has increased by 189 percent and while rapid growth in enrollment can present challenges to educators, WIVA demonstrated a graduation rate increase of 18.1 percentage points.

Much of the academic success at WIVA can be directly attributed to the importance of building strong relationships. WIVA school leaders emphasize that the relationships teachers have with each other and between students, the partnerships between school and family, paired with school and district contributed to WIVA's success.

WIVA teachers build strong professional relationships through focused and strong collaboration, keeping track of student performance data, and delivering student-specific instruction,” said Dr. Leslye Moraski Erickson, WIVA head of school. “WIVA teachers support one another through coaching programs, where experienced and effective teachers serve as instructional coaches to ensure best practices are implemented appropriately. Additionally, WIVA focuses on building strong relationships with families through initiatives like FAST (Family Academic Support Team). FAST members work with families to overcome social or emotional obstacles that may prevent students from fully engaging with learning.”

Compared to demographically similar district, Racine Unified, WIVA students outperformed the district in Reading across the past three school years and in all grades tested (3-8). In Mathematics, across the past three school years with the exception of grades 4 and 5 in 2011, WIVA students outperformed the comparable district.

WIVA also demonstrated that economically disadvantaged students grow stronger over time. In the 2013-2014 school year, 57% of the more than 1,900 students enrolled were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch (FRL), a higher percentage than the national average.

In Reading, compared to students enrolled less than 1 year, WIVA's FRL-eligible students enrolled 3 years or more achieved higher proficiency percentages in all FRL groups. The gap between Reduced-Price Lunch Eligible students and Not Eligible students narrowed from 35 percentage points for students enrolled less than 1 year to 18 percentage points for students enrolled 3 years or more. In Mathematics, compared to students enrolled less than 1 year, WIVA students enrolled 3 years or more achieved higher proficiency percentages in all FRL groups.

WIVA leadership understands the need to focus on building support systems to help struggling students overcome obstacles and achieve their maximum potential. WIVA plans to continue building and extending the network of strong relationships that has contributed to the school's success.

About K12 Inc.

K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN) is driving innovation and advancing the quality of education by delivering state-of-the-art, digital learning platforms and technology to students and school districts across the globe. With nearly a half-billion dollars invested in developing award winning curriculum, K12 serves over 2,000 schools and school districts and has delivered more than four million courses over the past decade. K12 is a company of educators with the nation's largest network of K-12 online school teachers, providing instruction, academic services, and learning solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms, blended school programs, and directly to families. For more information on K12 Inc., visit www.K12.com

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To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/k12-inc-report-shows-achievement-gains-at-wisconsin-virtual-academy-300103283.html

SOURCE K12 Inc.

Copyright (C) 2015 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

Gene V. Glass, distinguished researcher of education at Arizona State University, surveys the amazing spread of school choice in Arizona and asks what are the results of the spread of choice. You have heard the stories about how vouchers and charters will “save poor kids from failing schools,” will create competition to improve public schools, will work wonders for everyone. It turns out that Arizona is the choice capital of the world but is still waiting for that miraculous success that its advocates promised and still promise.


 


Professor Glass shows how dramatically choice has spread across Arizona, with the urging of choice advocates in the government and the private sector.


 


Glass writes:


 


Now Arizona is the school choice capital of the world: 1) 500 charter schools – soon to be closer to 600 if New Schools for Phoenix has its way, and they will; 2) huge virtual academies run by out-of-state companies like K12 Inc.; 3) open enrollment laws; 4) tuition tax credits subsidizing families sending their kids to religious schools; and 5) a history of active homeschooling. In fact, the number of students whose parents have “chosen” is staggering. There are 1,100,000 students of K-12 school age in Arizona. Of that number, 180,000 attend charter schools, 200,000 have exercised their right to switch school districts under open enrollment laws, and about 80,000 attend private (mostly religious)schools or are homeschooled. That amounts to more than 400,000 “choice students” in Arizona out of a population of a little more than one million for a choice ratio of about 40% plus.


 


With nearly half of all students enjoying the benefit of choice – with its effects on driving incompetent teachers out of work, shutting down bad schools, stimulating private and public schools to reach higher levels of effort and innovation – the condition of K-12 education in Arizona must be nothing short of fantastic!


 


But, to hear the state’s politicians and business leaders speak of it, Arizona’s school systems are terrible. Below average; lagging behind other nations; a threat to the economy of the entire state; not preparing students for college or careers; in need of major reforms; bring on the Common Core. Arizona’s education system is the paragon of choice, and yet it is a mess. Somebody needs to get their stories straight.
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1HeBT8y

K12 Ducks Investor Class Action Over 38% Stock Drop – Law360

K12 Ducks Investor Class Action Over 38% Stock Drop

Share us on: By Cara Salvatore

Law360, New York (November 06, 2014, 2:55 PM ET) – A federal judge has dismissed a putative class action against online for-profit public school company K12 Inc. over a 38 percent stock drop it experienced last fall, saying Wednesday that the company's leaders didn't intentionally mislead investors.

Oklahoma Firefighters Pension & Retirement System said it lost hundreds of millions of dollars when the company announced that its enrollment numbers were down and the stock plummeted. The pension fund's class action complaint blamed the October 2013 drop on allegedly misleading statements made by K12 officers in an eight-month period leading up to the stock drop.



But U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga didn't find enough evidence to support that contention, saying the facts didn't show scienter and one alleged misleading statement by Chief Operating Officer Timothy Murray was simply a “year-to-date assessment of performance.”



“Based on the facts alleged, the court concludes that none of the relied-upon class period statements are actionable. None of them contains false or misleading statements of historical fact or actionable opinions, and there are no facts that any defendant made any relied-upon statement with the required scienter,” Judge Trenga wrote Wednesday.



During that eight-month period before the drop, the stock rose from $18.53 to $37.85, the complaint said. But the company was partially a victim of its own success when applications couldn't be converted into enrollments because the company's call centers didn't have enough capacity, the complaint said.



The complaint also made reference to glowing predictions by outside analysts.



But the judge warned, “the impact on investors of defendants' lack of managerial competence cannot be minimized, and this case is a cautionary tale concerning the risks inherent in relying on corporate management's endorsements of analysts' forecasts, against which the securities laws … provide limited protections.”



“We are very gratified by Judge Trenga’s comprehensive and thoughtful opinion,” Peter Wald of Latham & Watkins, an attorney for K12, told Law360 Thursday. “The opinion adds to the Fourth Circuit’s jurisprudence on 'forward-looking' and 'puffing' statements, and upholds the Reform Act’s bar on 'fraud by hindsight' pleading.”



The plaintiffs filed the original complaint in January and an amended complaint in May alleging claims under Sections 10(b), 20(a), and 20A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5.



K12 put a different investor suit over a separate stock drop to bed in July of 2013, when a Virginia federal judge gave final approval to a $6.8 million settlement K12 struck with stockholders, ending a row over whether the company misled investors about its enrollment and student performance.



Investors, led by the Arkansas Teacher Retirement System, claimed K12 lied about students’ performance on tests and student enrollment, leading investors to believe the company was doing very well. That final judgment closed out an 18-month battle.



The class alleged K12 failed to disclose its “improper and deceptive” recruiting and sales strategies, that the schools' teachers were pressured to pass poorly performing students and that the company falsely characterized students' success on state tests. But after a New York Times expose in late 2011, the stock price plunged quickly, decimating the retirement fund’s investment, according to the complaint.



K12 agreed in March 2013 to settle the dispute for $6.8 million, or about 30 cents a share, according to court documents.



In December 2011, the article in The New York Times revealed holes in K12’s story that it was wildly successful at churning out high-performing students, according to the original complaint. The information in the story was public information that should have been given to investors, the class argued.



The company opened nine new schools in 2014, according to its annual SEC report. Its three business lines are “Managed Public Schools (turn-key management services sold to public schools), Institutional Sales (educational products and services sold to school districts, public schools and other educational institutions that we do not manage), and International and Private Pay Schools (private schools for which we charge student tuition and make direct consumer sales),” according to the filing.



The plaintiffs are represented by Elizabeth Aniskevich of Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll PLLC.



K12 is represented by Peter Wald, Kevin Metz, Colleen Smith, Marcy Priedeman and Stephen Barry of Latham & Watkins LLP.



The case is Oklahoma Firefighters Pension & Retirement System v. K12, Inc. et al., case number 1:14-cv-00108, in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.



–Additional reporting by Kat Greene. Editing by Emily Kokoll.





Tom Scarice, the superintendent of the Madison, Connecticut, public schools, writes that the campaign for the Common Core has been waged with fear tactics, mainly the fear that other nations have higher scores and will therefore “beat” us. But, he points out, citing the work of Yong Zhao, there is no connection between test scores and economic growth.


He concludes:


“Reducing the debate of the common core to a matter of implementation is intellectually weak. A number of other matters remain unresolved. The standards were never field tested with actual students. They have been largely influenced through massive donations via powerful philanthropic organizations such as the Gates Foundation, creating a chilling question about the consequential influence of one billionaire on our education system. Questions about whether or not the standards are appropriate for our youngest and most fragile learners have been raised by over 500 nationally recognized early childhood experts, and special education organizations. Categorically, no evidence exists to support the stance that the common core will raise the achievement of our most impoverished students, which is the most pressing challenge facing Connecticut. Education is much too complex to reduce our work to another futile silver bullet.


“Connecticut has had academic standards for decades. Academic standards, developed by education professionals, are largely embraced by educators. They serve to set clear expectations for the accountability of learning and form the basis of curriculum. However, the rigidity of the common core, mandating that each and every student achieve the same learning progressions, regardless of learning style, and individual learning profile, at the exact same rate, contribute to the epidemic of standardization and homogenization that has afflicted our schools for the past decade. This is particularly concerning when the global marketplace and the demands of citizenship in this era clearly necessitate an individual’s diversity of thought and skills.


“All that said, even within the broken testing and evaluation systems suffocating our schools, there are many individual standards within the common core that are worthy of academic pursuit. Districts would be best served to approach the common core with thoughtful analysis of the potential efficacy and appropriateness of each individual standard as they integrate them into curriculum. Plausible rejection of individual standards by local professional educators must be shared transparently with Boards of Education and the local community, backed up with appropriate justification. As always, healthy skepticism and deep analysis serve systems well. Every state and every district has multiple indicators of student success. What would local accountability look like beyond one tightly coupled measure to the common core? Is student success defined by performance on the SBAC, and if not, will local districts have the fortitude to move beyond the narrow, inadequate comparisons that are provided by standardized assessments?There is more to the story of student success beyond the implementation of the common core.”
















via Diane Ravitch’s blog http://ift.tt/1AjpBmS

Second Chance at Diploma for Older Students Starts Aug. 25 at Innovative Blended Learning School – WSJ.com

Second Chance at Diploma for Older Students Starts Aug. 25 at Innovative Blended Learning School

Virtual High School at Youth Connections Charter School Fosters Success and Achieves Above-Average Graduation Rate  

CHICAGO, Aug. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – The first day of school is always an exciting time for students and families – especially so for the odds-defying students in the Virtual High School at Youth Connections Charter School.

The program's students are 18- to 21-year olds embarking on an inspiring effort to put past challenges behind them – and finally land their high school degrees.

The school, a tuition-free public charter school, offers a blended academic program that combines online learning and in-person instruction with supportive social services. For the past five years, YCCS Virtual High School has been achieving success with an age group that often is considered unlikely to earn a diploma. This academic year's classes begin Aug. 25.

“Some people think older students are past the point of no return in terms of getting a degree, but our students are passionate, driven and successful,” says Liz Roth, head of school at YCCS Virtual High School. “These students are ready to prove the conventional wisdom about alternative education wrong.”

“More and more students come to YCCS Virtual High School each fall excited to learn and grow,” Roth says. “Our program is the only one of its kind in Chicago, and our students rise to the occasion. Their successes impress us every year.”

Last year, 84 students graduated from the YCCS Virtual High School program. “Our above-average graduation rate – 92 percent – is a testament to the extraordinary drive and dedication of our students,” Roth says. “Seeing new faces come in excited to learn gives such a lift to everyone at the school.”

This year, the school welcomes a new English teacher, David Larson, along with several new courses, including forensic science, careers in criminal justice and early-childhood development.

“This program gives an opportunity for students to reach their goals and receive their high school diploma, while receiving the support they need into their post-secondary venture,” Roth says.

The Virtual High School program at YCCS offers a variety of advantages:

   – A flexible schedule that works with each student's job, family life and       personal circumstances     – An award-winning curriculum from K12 Inc.     – An individualized learning approach to meet each student's personal needs     – Support from passionate, professional Illinois-certified teachers     – A high-school diploma that meets all state requirements. 

In addition to the academic program, YCCS Virtual High School provides students with support services ranging from career and academic counseling to social service referrals and Students in Transitional Living Situations (STLS) Services.

“By surrounding these students with a complete set of supportive services we can really give them the best possible chance to succeed,” said Roth. “We have some amazing success stories and our students sometimes surprise themselves with their capacity to rise to the challenge of gaining their diploma.”

Students and family interested in learning more about Youth Connections Charter School Virtual High School can call (312) 429-0027 or visit www.k12.com/yccs.

About K12 Inc.

K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN) is the nation's foremost provider of proprietary technology-powered online solutions for students in pre-kindergarten through high school. K12 has partnered with more than 2,000 school districts and has delivered more than 4 million courses over the past decade. K12 provides curricula, academic services and learning solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms, blended school programs and families. K12 works with more than 5,000 teachers across the U.S. – the largest network of online school teachers in grades K through 12.

The K12 program is offered through K12 partner public schools in more than two-thirds of the states and the District of Columbia, and through private schools serving students in all 50 states and more than 110 countries. More information can be found at http://www.K12.com

SOURCE Virtual High School at Youth Connections Charter School

/CONTACT: Alex Gaterud, alexg@fasthorseinc.com, 507.381.3262

/Web site: http://www.K12.com

    Youth Connections Charter School Virtual High School graduation ceremony will honor inspiring students who overcame challenges  

    CHICAGO, June 12, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Talk to parents about “alternative education” and they may picture troubled kids, burned-out teachers, bad schools and a total lack of resources.

    But an innovative blended charter school program in Chicago shatters that image, turning what is often considered the “end of the line” in high school education into a springboard of hope and inspiration.

    The Virtual High School at Youth Connections Charter School (YCCS) accepts students from ages 18 to 21 and, using a combination of in-person and online instruction, achieves success with students who need a second chance at earning a high school diploma.

    This year, 85 students will show how they took advantage of the opportunity to succeed. The school will celebrate during a graduation ceremony on Monday, June 16, at Malcolm X College. Ceremonies begin at 5 p.m.

    Each graduate has a tale to tell of working hard to overcome challenges. One example is Tykeisha Smith, who struggled in traditional schools. Smith says she realized her potential and dedication while attending the YCCS virtual high school.

    “I used to get down on myself for not knowing something in school, but I actually did know it,” Smith says. “I just needed to work on it in my own way.”

    Tykeisha will head off to Robert Morris University in the fall to study business and marketing – something she credits to her YCCS education.

    The blended charter high school, a tuition-free charter school, is open to Chicago residents aged 18 to 21 who have at least 12 high-school credits. The curriculum and school program is provided by K12 Inc., is the nation's foremost provider of proprietary technology-powered online solutions for students in pre-kindergarten through high school.

    In the past four years, YCCS has enabled 92 percent of its students to graduate, a stellar rate of success that far outpaces the national average.

    “With the right support, our students absolutely thrive,” says Elizabeth Roth, Head of School for the YCCS Virtual High School. “This program gives an opportunity for students to reach their goals and receive their high school diploma, while receiving the support they need into their post-secondary venture. There's not another program like this in Chicago that targets this age range”

    To learn more about the Youth Connections Charter School Virtual High School, visit http://www.k12.com/yccs/home.

    Graduation Ceremony Details

    June 16, 5 p.m. | Malcolm X College | 1900 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, IL 60612

    Commencement speaker Vincent T. Williams and Second Ward Alderman Bob Fioretti will be on hand to congratulate YCCS's graduates, many of whom will attend colleges, universities and technical schools across the country this fall. YCCS is graduating 85 students in its class of 2014.

    Valedictorian Megan Barrios and Salutatorian Gloria Marquez will be recognized during the ceremony. The school also will give out two awards: the Rising Star Award and the Student of the Year award. The Rising Star recognizes the student who teachers say showed the most improvement–socially, academically and professionally–since starting at YCCS. The Student of the Year is selected from the academic year's Students of the Month, who demonstrated community leadership, good attitudes and school involvement.

    About K12 Inc.

    K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN) is the nation's foremost provider of proprietary technology-powered online solutions for students in pre-kindergarten through high school. K12 has partnered with more than 2,000 school districts and has delivered more than 4 million courses over the past decade. K12 provides curricula, academic services and learning solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms, blended school programs and families. K12 works with more than 5,000 teachers across the U.S. – the largest network of online school teachers in grades K through 12.

    The K12 program is offered through K12 partner public schools in more than two-thirds of the states and the District of Columbia, and through private schools serving students in all 50 states and more than 110 countries. More information can be found at http://www.K12.com

    Video – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXdC8MhqiV0

    SOURCE Youth Connection Charter School Virtual High School

    /CONTACT: Bob Ingrassia, bobi@fasthorseinc.com, 612-670-1328

    
    

    Fuel Education Announces New Online and Blended Courses for Middle and High School Math As Part of its Expanded 2014-2015 Catalog

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    Fuel Education Announces New Online and Blended Courses for Middle and High School Math As Part of its Expanded 2014-2015 Catalog

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    HERNDON, Va., May 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ –Personalized learning solutions provider Fuel Education today announced it is expanding its comprehensive portfolio of more than 500 unique online and blended courses and titles for pre-K through 12th grade with more than 25 new additions for the 2014-2015 school year.

    Fuel Education's catalog now features multiple new math courses for middle and high school students, new electives designed to promote career readiness, as well as the recently announced mobile, standards-aligned FuelEd Middle School curriculum. Each course or title has been developed in full alignment with the Common Core State Standards, as well as other state and national standards.

    Fuel Education's new middle and high school math courses for blended and/or full-time learning include:



    • Algebra, Geometry, and Fundamentals of Algebra and Geometry Fundamentals of Algebra and Geometry provides students enhanced computational and problem-solving skills while learning topics in algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics. Pre-Algebra provides students a broader look at computational and problem-solving skills while learning the language of algebra, and Algebra enables students to deepen their computational and problem-solving fluency through topics in linear relationships, functions, and geometry.
    • Developmental Algebra and Continuing Algebra for high school This two-year algebra sequence, that begins with an exploration of the tools and principles of algebra is designed to provide students completing these two courses with a deep understanding of Algebra I.
    • Algebra I Extended Learning for high school Students are able to master working with and evaluating mathematical expressions, equations, graphs, and other topics, with an emphasis on real-world applications throughout this year-long course. Unlike a traditional Algebra course, this course uses adaptive learning technology and contains a built-in diagnostic to assess foundational pre-algebra skills, and provides instruction targeting any gaps in prerequisite skills. After these learning gaps are addressed and tested, algebra instruction is presented. If mastery is not achieved following core instruction, alternative activities are presented to improve comprehension.
    • Integrated Mathematics I, II and III for high school In these three courses, which are aligned to the Integrated Pathway for Mathematics as defined in the Common Core State Standards, students learn about linear and simple exponential models, followed by irrational and complex numbers and quadratic polynomials, and then learn how to integrate all of these concepts in the third course.

    “Mathematics is so closely tied to overall student success that educators now regard Algebra I as a key predictor of high school success, and Algebra II as key predictor for work, college, and career success even further down the road,” said David Pelizzari, Vice President of Curriculum.

    “We are happy to offer new paths to mathematics success for middle school and high school studentspaced in different ways and scaffolded to support an even wider range of students, from those with the greatest skills to those needing the most reinforcement, review, and support. These fresh offerings are aligned with the new standards and more sophisticated assessments associated with Common Core State Standards and many state standards, offering high quality course choices for every type of student.”

    Also new for the coming school year is 7 new high school electives designed to engage teenagers and promote exploration of their career interests. New electives include Careers in Criminal Justice, Introduction to Agriscience, Public Speaking, Early Childhood Education, and Entrepreneurship. In addition, many electives previously available for blended programs are now available for full-time programs.

    As previously announced, the catalog also features FuelEd Online Courses for Middle School, the standards-aligned curriculum designed for students as they transition through the “make or break” years, available on a wide variety of platforms and devices such as the iPad, Chromebook and Android.

    New courses designed for blended learning are also integrated into PEAK, Fuel Education's Personalized Learning Platform, which makes it easy for districts to integrate and manage all of their online learning programs in one place. In addition, teachers can easily customize the courses with resources available in the PEAK Library, which includes more than 5,500 supplemental lessons and assessments plus content from third-party partners such as Britannica School, and open educational resources such as Khan Academy and YouTube Education.

    All of Fuel Education's courses, including core, foundational, honors, AP, world languages and credit recovery courses, can be found in Course Finder in the Curriculum section of the company's web site.

    About Fuel Education

    Fuel Education partners with school districts to fuel personalized learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform, PEAK, enables teachers to customize courses using their own content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open educational resources. Fuel Education offers the industry's largest catalog of digital curriculum, certified instruction, professional development, and educational services. FuelEd has helped 2,000 school districts to improve student outcomes and better serve diverse student populations. To learn more, visit getfueled.com and Twitter.

    2014 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education, FuelEd, and PEAK are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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    SOURCE Fuel Education

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