K12 Inc. to Present at BMO Capital Markets 16th Annual Back To School Conference

August 18, 2016 11:39 AM Eastern Daylight Time

HERNDON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), a technology-based education company and leading
provider of proprietary curriculum and online school programs for
students in pre-K through high school, today announced that it will be
presenting at the 16th Annual BMO Capital Markets Back To School
Conference. The event will take place on Thursday, September 15, 2016
and will be held at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York, NY.

K12 joins the online learning community on that day in marking the
first-ever National Online Learning Day (http://www.onlinelearningday.com).
The community of online learners is rapidly growing as student and
teacher engagement expands beyond the boundaries of traditional
learning. Online learning opens up new avenues of exploration and is
available to all learners, from pre-school to college and beyond.
Students can study almost any subject- anywhere, anytime. National
Online Learning Day is dedicated to showcasing the accomplishments of
online students and educators.

Stuart Udell, K12’s Chief Executive Officer will be presenting at 3:45
p.m. Eastern and both he, and James Rhyu, Chief Financial Officer will
be hosting meetings with institutional investors throughout the day. If
you wish to schedule a meeting with the Company, please contact your BMO
Capital Markets representative or Mike Kraft, Vice President Finance.

About K12 Inc.

K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN)
is driving innovation and advancing the quality of education by
delivering state-of-the-art, digital learning platforms and technology
to students and school districts across the globe. K12’s award winning
curriculum serves over 2,000 schools and school districts and has
delivered more than four million courses over the past decade. K12 is a
company of educators with the nation’s largest network of K-12 online
school teachers, providing instruction, academic services, and learning
solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms,
blended school programs, and directly to families. The K12program
is offered through K12partner public schools in 33
states and the District of Columbia, and through private schools serving
students in all 50 states and more than 100 countries. More information
can be found at K12.com.

Contacts

K12 Inc.Investor and Press Contact:Mike Kraft,
571-353-7778VP Financemkraft@k12.com

K12 Inc. Deploys D2L’s Brightspace Across High School, Middle School and Fuel Education

KITCHENER, ON–(Marketwired – August 11, 2016) – D2L, a global learning technology leader, today announced that K12 Inc., one of the largest virtual schools in the U.S., is continuing to expand the use of the Brightspace LMS. Following a successful rollout to thousands of students across the country enrolled in K12’s high school, K12 is now making Brightspace available to thousands more middle school students.

In addition, K12’s Fuel Education will use Brightspace for the distribution of its curriculum. Fuel Education will begin rolling out Brightspace in December with a full rollout scheduled for the first half of 2017.

D2L’s Brightspace platform was embraced by K12 due to a fundamental distinction: Brightspace delivers a personalized learning experience, not the one-size-fits-all model utilized by traditional LMS offerings. Brightspace was designed with modern students in mind and offers a clean, responsive user experience as well as integrated social media, game-based learning, chat and advanced video features. The new Brightspace Daylight experience lets students and teachers use smartphones, tablets or any browser-enabled device, eliminating barriers to learning. Teachers also favor Brightspace because engagement data — offered via real-time learning analytics </strong–< can help them improve student outcomes.

“D2L’s customers such as K12 Inc. care deeply about the educational experience and want a more personalized, engaging learning platform to help each learner learn their own way,” said John Baker, CEO of D2L. “Brightspace is an easy, flexible and smart LMS that was built from the ground up to do exactly that. We are very pleased that K12 and Fuel Education learners will benefit from this personalized approach and learn on their own terms to achieve their academic goals. We look forward to continuing to broaden the scope of our partnership.”

“Our goal in considering a new LMS was to improve student engagement, retention and outcomes while advancing our effort to deliver a more mobile-ready curriculum,” explained Lynda Cloud, Executive Vice President of Products at K12 Inc. “After thorough evaluation, K12 chose D2L to power K12’s next-generation online high school and middle school. The Brightspace platform has enabled us to provide students, learning coaches, and teachers with an innovative, engaging and collaborative learning experience that puts tools and resources right at their fingertips. Parents find that both they and their students have better visibility into what students need to do each day, allowing them to spend more time learning.”

D2L’s track record of innovation has been widely recognized. In March, Fast Company ranked D2L #6 on the Most Innovative Companies of 2016 list in the Data Science Category, amongst Google, IBM, Spotify, Costco, and Blue Cross Blue Shield. eLearning Magazine recently rated D2L as #1 in Adaptive Learning, and Brightspace was recently named the #1 LMS in Higher Ed by Ovum Research.

To learn more about Brightspace, visit http://www.d2l.com/products/learning-environment/.

ABOUT K12 INC.

K12 Inc. (LRN) is driving innovation and advancing the quality of education by delivering state-of-the-art, digital learning platforms and technology to students and school districts across the globe. K12’s award winning curriculum serves over 2,000 schools and school districts and has delivered more than four million courses over the past decade. K12 is a company of educators with the nation’s largest network of K-12 online school teachers, providing instruction, academic services, and learning solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms, blended school programs, and directly to families. The K12 program is offered through K12 partner public schools in approximately two-thirds of the states and the District of Columbia, and through private schools serving students in all 50 states and more than 100 countries. More information can be found at K12.com.

ABOUT FUEL EDUCATION

Fuel Education™ partners with school districts to fuel personalized learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through 12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform, PEAK™, enables teachers to customize courses using their own content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open educational resources. Fuel Education offers one of the industry’s largest catalogs of K–12 digital curriculum, certified instruction, professional development, and educational services. FuelEd has helped 2,000 school districts to improve student outcomes and better serve diverse student populations. To learn more, visit getfueled.com and Twitter.

ABOUT BRIGHTSPACE

D2L’s Brightspace is a digital learning platform that helps schools and institutions deliver personalized learning experiences in a classroom or online to people anywhere in the world. Created for the digital learner, Brightspace is cloud-based, runs on mobile devices, and offers rich multimedia to increase engagement, productivity and knowledge retention. The platform makes it easy to design courses, create content, and grade assignments, giving instructors more time to focus on what’s most important – greater teaching and learning. At the same time, analytics reports track and deliver insights into the performance levels of departments, courses, or individuals.

ABOUT D2L

D2L is the software leader that makes learning experiences better. The company’s cloud-based platform, Brightspace, is easy to use, flexible, and smart. With Brightspace, organizations can personalize the experience for every learner to deliver real results. The company is a world leader in learning analytics: its platform predicts learner performance so that organizations can take action in real-time to keep learners on track. Brightspace is used by learners in higher education, K-12, and the enterprise sector, including the Fortune 1000. D2L has operations in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, Brazil, and Singapore. www.d2l.com

© 2016 D2L Corporation.

The D2L family of companies includes D2L Corporation, D2L Ltd, D2L Australia Pty Ltd, D2L Europe Ltd, D2L Asia Pte Ltd, and D2L Brasil Soluções de Tecnologia para Educação Ltda.

All D2L marks are trademarks of D2L Corporation. Please visit D2L.com/trademarks for a list of D2L marks.

K12 upgraded to Overweight By First Analysis

August 10, 2016 10:01 am

Writer: Camille Ainsworth

Posted In:

US Broker Ratings

In an analyst rating update on Wednesday shares of K12 (NYSE:LRN) had their rating upgraded by analysts at First Analysis.

The broker said it has now set a ‘Overweight’ rating on shares of K12 with a price target of 14. The price target according to the broker shows a possible increase of 23.35% from the current stock price of 11.35.

Over the last twelve months K12’s share price has decreased from 14.88 to 11.35, changing by -23.72%.

The companies 50 day moving average is 12.68 and its 200 day moving average is 11.16. The 52 week high K12’s shares have peaked at is 15 whilst the 52 week low for the company’s shares is 7.11.

K12 has 37,492,000 shares which are currently outstanding with a price of 11.35 calculating K12’s market capitalisation to 425.53M USD .

K12 Inc. (K12) is a technology-based education company. The Company offers curriculum, software systems and educational services designed to facilitate individualized learning for students in kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12). It provides a range of technology-based educational products and solutions to public school districts, public schools, virtual charter schools, private schools and families. The Company offers a set of products and services primarily to three lines of business, which include public school programs, which consists of managed programs and non-managed programs, Institutional Sales, which includes educational products and services sold to school districts, public schools and other educational institutions that it does not manage and international and private pay schools, which consists of private schools. The Company offers a range of learning applications, which include mobile learning, interactive games, virtual labs, e-book and digital book distribution.

Option Market: K12 Inc Risk Hits An Elevated Level

K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) Risk

Date Published:

2016-07-18

PREFACE

This is a proprietary risk rating for the next 30-days built by Capital Market Laboratories (CMLviz) based on a large number of interactions of data points, many of which
come directly from the option market for K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) .

Risk as reflected by the option market has hit
a slightly elevated level relative to the company’s past. The option market reflects a 95% confidence interval stock price range of
($11.90, $15.00) within the next 30 calendar days.

LRN OPTION MARKET RISK

The short-term risk for a stock is reflected in the option market by a measure called the 30-day implied volatility or IV30®.
The IV30 is the risk reflected by the option market in the stock price for the next 30 calendar days — it’s forward looking.
K12 Inc shows an IV30 of 50.1%, which is a slightly elevated level for the company relative to its past.

The option market for LRN has shown an IV30 annual low of
38.6% and an annual high of 72.8%, meaning that LRN is at the 34% percentile right now. Here’s a table of the data before we dig into the risk rating further.

LRN
Current IV30    
LRN
Low IV30    
LRN
High IV30   
50.1% 38.6% 72.8%

01020304050607080Current IV30Low IV30High IV30

The option market reflects less risk in the next 30 calendar days for K12 Inc (NYSE:LRN) than on average.

Further, if we look backwards, the stock has a realized 30-day historical volatility, called the HV30, of 39.03%.

We have an unusual situation now where the IV30 is depressed relative to the past, but even with that risk pricing, the option market reflects the likelihood of a greater stock movement in the next 30-days than the stock has realized in the last 30-days.

Let’s turn to a chart to see what’s going on.

 0510152025303540455055Next 30 DaysLast 30 Days

Note how much higher the future risk for K12 Inc is priced (50.1%) compared to what happened just in the last 30-days (39.0%).

K12 Inc Risk Rating

The LRN risk rating is at 3.5, where the rating goes from one (the lowest risk) to five (the highest risk). The driving factors for the 3.5 rating are:

↪ The IV30 is below the annual average.

↪ The IV30 is above 50%.

↪ The HV30 is below the 20th percentile.

↪ The IV30 is above the HV30.

↪ The stock has moved +33.0% over the last 3-months which does indicate some elevated risk.

WHY THIS MATTERS

Understanding short-term risk is important, but it is not the silver bullet of investing. At Capital Market Labs we identify thematic trends that will revolutionize our futures and the companies that will benefit most from them to find the “next Apple” or the “next Google.” Our research sits side-by-side with Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and the rest on professional terminals, but we are the anti-institution. Our purpose is to break the information monopoly held by the top .1%.
Each company in our ‘Top Picks’ is the single winner in an exploding thematic shift like artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, drones, biotech and more. In fact, here is just one of the trends that will radically affect the future that we are ahead of:

Virtual reality is one of the fundamental shifts coming in the very near future that will change how we live, work, and play. This is a technology whose consumer base looks increasingly like all of humanity. This is the opportunity so many investors say they welcome – that say they search for. The opportunity to find the “Next Apple,” or the “next Google.” Friends, it’s coming right now, and it lies in the depths of technology’s core. It’s not artificial intelligence, it’s artificial super intelligence and there is one company that will rule all of it.

This just one of the themes we have identified and this is just one of the fantastic reports CML Pro members get along with all the visual tools, the precious few thematic top picks for 2016, research dossiers and alerts. For a limited time we are offering CML Pro at a 90% discount for $10/mo. with a lifetime guaranteed rate.

Join Us: Get the most advanced premium research delivered to your inbox along with access to visual tools and data that until now has only been made available to the top 1%.

Charter School Must Pay California Millions

By DON DEBENEDICTIS 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) — The operator of 14 online charter schools in California must pay the state $8.5 million, provide $160 million in debt relief and reform itself to resolve charges of false advertising and using misrepresentations to increase its taxpayer funding.     The settlement should end a July 8 lawsuit the attorney general filed against Virginia-based K12 Inc. and its 14 California schools, and a 2012 whistleblower lawsuit against K12 and its California Virtual Academy @ Los Angeles.     The profit-seeking K12 and its “virtual,” or online, schools, misrepresented their students’ achievements, test scores, class size, individualized instruction and parent satisfaction, the state says in its Superior Court complaint.     All 14 California defendants are named a variation of “California Virtual Academy”: California Virtual Academy @ San Mateo, California Virtual Academy @ Los Angeles, and so on. All 14 are organized as, or operated by, nonprofit California Public Benefit corporations.     “K12 ‘provides substantially all of the management, technology and academic support services in addition to curriculum, learning systems and instructional services’ for the virtual school defendants,” the attorney general says in the lawsuit, without specifying what she is quoting in the interior quotes.     The complaint continues: “The virtual school defendants receive funds from the State of California every year to pay for the education of the approximately 13,000 students attending these schools. Pursuant to the agreements, the virtual school defendants pay significant management and technology fees to K12 based on a percentage of the total funding the virtual school defendants receive.”     The fees include the cost of using K12’s software to take the Internet classes, for which students must pay, despite the defendants’ offer of a free education, according to the state.     Also, K12 et al. advertised that graduates would qualify for the University of California and California State University campuses, though they did not offer classes in several areas required for UC admission, according to the complaint.     At K12’s direction, the 14 schools inflated their daily attendance to collect unjustified funding from the state Department of Education: They credited students with a full day at school for logging in to class for as little as one minute, according to the whistleblower lawsuit.     “All children deserve, and are entitled under the law, to an equal education,” Attorney General Kamala Harris said in a statement. “K12 and its schools misled parents and the State of California by claiming taxpayer dollars for questionable student attendance, misstating student success and parent satisfaction, and loading nonprofit charities with debt.”     Harris put the total value of the settlement at $168.5 million because the agreement requires K12 to expunge about $160 million in so-called “balanced budget credits” the company provided the online schools under their contracts. Harris called the $160 million debt relief.     But in an angry retort, K12’s CEO said the company never sought or expected to collect on the credits, which he called subsidies, not debts.     “The attorney general’s claim of $168.5 million in today’s announcement is flat wrong,” Stuart Udell said in a statement. “Despite our full cooperation throughout the process, the Office of the Attorney General grossly mischaracterized the value of the settlement just as it did with regard to the issues it investigated.”     Udell put the value of the settlement at only $2.5 million: the amount K12 will pay to resolve claims it inflated attendance figures. It will pay another $6 million to cover the costs of the attorney general’s investigation and to fund other “enforcement cases to protect the rights of children” by the office, according to the main settlement document.     K12’s attorneys, Timothy Hatch with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in Los Angeles and Peter Wald with Latham & Watkins in San Francisco did not respond to requests for comment. Neither did the attorney for the charter schools, Paul C. Minney, with Young, Minney & Corr in Sacramento.     K12 did not admit wrongdoing or liability in the settlement, but it had been under fire for some time. In addition to the attorney general’s months-long probe, the California Department of Education was monitoring it, and the San Jose Mercury News published a series of investigative stories on it this spring.     The case began with a whistleblower lawsuit filed under seal in 2012 by a teacher from the California Virtual Academy @ Los Angeles. Susie Kaplar claimed she had been fired for refusing to pad her attendance figures. Because she filed the suit on behalf of the state, the attorney general’s office was able to take it over and bring its own suit.     The settlement agreement for her lawsuit includes the $2.5 million payment on attendance data. Under state law, Kaplar should collect an undisclosed portion of the settlement. She also will receive $80,000 in damages and attorneys’ fees.     Kaplar’s attorney, J. Mark Moore in Canoga Park, did not return a call seeking comment.     The California Charter Schools Association, which usually supports charter operators, praised the attorney general’s actions.     “CCSA condemns the predatory and dishonest practices employed by K12, Inc. to dupe parents using misleading marketing schemes, siphon taxpayer dollars with inflated student attendance data, and coerce [the nonprofit schools] into dubious contracting arrangements,” the association said in a statement.     It also endorsed legislation pending in Sacramento to prevent for-profit companies from controlling or operating charter schools.

Charter school organizations take stand against virtual schools

Dive Brief:

  • The National Alliance for Public Charter schools, the 50-State Campaign for Achievement Now, and the National Association of Charter School Authorizers released a call to action Thursday to hold full-time virtual charter schools accountable for student performance.
  • The joint report highlights research showing that students who attend these schools perform worse than their traditional public school counterparts on virtually every metric and across all subgroups, and it calls on charter school authorizers to make renewal and closure decisions based on progress toward rigorous performance goals.
  • The report also encourages statewide enrollment caps at virtual charter schools, enrollment criteria so only students who would be best-served by virtual schools get in, and funding levels based on performance and real costs of operating such schools.

Dive Insight:

One complaint of the rise of virtual charter schools has been the lack of cost-savings for traditional districts that have to funnel a portion of their funding to the charters. Virtual schools, with no brick-and-mortar maintenance or transportation costs, and higher student-to-teacher ratios should be expected to operate with lower per-student funding than traditional schools. Critics have accused major players in the virtual charter school space, like K12 Inc., of operating with too-high profits. The CEO of the massive virtual school earned more than $5.3 million in total compensation in 2015, according to SEC filings.

Virtual charter schools defend their student performance by saying they attract students traditional schools have failed, arguing they serve cohorts who come to them already behind. More rigorous performance standards would have to take student demographics into account when setting expectations.

Recommended Reading

U.S. News & World Report:
Charter Groups Call Out Virtual Schools

Michael Stratford:
Revamping virtual charter schools

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Blended and Online Learning Solutions from Fuel Education Recognized by Education Industry’s Leading Awards Programs

PEAK™ and LearnBop® chosen in 2016 BESSIE, CODiE, Cool Tool, International Distance Learning, and Revere awards programs

08:15 ET
from Fuel Education

HERNDON, Va., May 26, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Personalized learning solutions provider Fuel Education™ (FuelEd™) has won two education industry awards and was named a finalist by three additional award programs for online and blended learning solutions PEAK™, its personalized learning platform, and LearnBop®, its interactive math learning system.

“Our school and district partners have seen tremendous success as they have implemented our solutions and technology to create innovative instructional models,” said Gregg Levin, General Manager of Fuel Education. “We are honored to be recognized by these award programs and look to further the use of digital learning to meet the individual needs of more students.”

Continue reading

getfueled.com (PRNewsFoto/Fuel Education)

PEAK, FuelEd’s personalized learning platform, won a 2016 BESSIE Award for Best Teacher Tools from ComputED Gazette. The BESSIE Awards, now in its 22nd year, target innovative and content-rich programs, apps, and websites that provide parents and teachers with the technology to foster educational excellence. PEAK was also a finalist in SIIA’s 2016 CODiE Awards for Best Cross-Curricular Solution, which recognizes the best software tools for students, educators, or administrators that can be used in multiple curriculum areas in the preK–12 or postsecondary market.

LearnBop, FuelEd’s interactive math program, won a Platinum 2016 International Distance Learning Award from the United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA) for Best Distance Learning Programming. This prestigious award is presented to organizations and individuals engaged in the development and delivery of distance learning programs. In addition to the company winning a platinum award, the founder of LearnBop, Bharani Rajakumar, won USDLA’s Outstanding Leadership by an Individual in the Field of Distance Learning Award for 2016.

LearnBop is also a current finalist in the Association of American Publishers’ 2016 Revere Awards in the Supplemental Resources for Mathematics category.  The REVERE Awards, which will be announced June 8, 2016, honor high quality resources that educate learners of all ages, in all media, and in all educational environments, both in and beyond the classroom.

In addition, both PEAK and LearnBop were recognized as finalists in EdTech Digest’s 2016 Cool Tool Awards for Best e-Learning, Blended, or Flipped Solution. EdTech Digest recognizes the best tools, people, and trendsetters in and around education for transforming education through technology to enrich the lives of learners everywhere. 

PEAK is FuelEd’s open technology platform featuring personalized dashboards that provide a unified view of online program metrics for administrators, teachers, and students, including single click access to teacher and learner tools, and an interactive display of student progress and performance. Using PEAK Library, the platform’s course customization tool, teachers can incorporate self-authored content, as well as third-party content from Khan Academy® and YouTube® Education, to quickly develop or customize assessments, lessons, or courses.

FuelEd’s exclusive partner LearnBop is an online math program that provides students in grades K–12 with instant step-by-step tutoring via guided hints, video, and adaptive feedback to teach students how to solve problems on their own. Because every step of each program is tagged with a core concept, teachers can immediately detect a student’s missing prerequisites.

About Fuel Education

Fuel Education™ partners with school districts to fuel personalized learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through 12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform, PEAK™, enables teachers to customize courses using their own content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open educational resources. Fuel Education offers the industry’s largest catalog of K–12 digital curriculum, certified instruction, professional development, and educational services. FuelEd has helped 2,000 school districts to improve student outcomes and better serve diverse student populations. To learn more, visit getfueled.com and Twitter.

©2016 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education, FuelEd, LearnBop and PEAK are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140821/138483

 

SOURCE Fuel Education

Related Links

http://www.getfueled.com

May 11, 2016, 08:30 ET

Preview: Idaho School District Wins 2016 Fuel Education™ Transformation Award

Read More

May 11, 2016, 08:30 ET

Idaho School District Wins 2016 Fuel Education™ Transformation…

Jan 06, 2016, 08:00 ET

Fourth Annual Survey of School and District Leaders Reveals…

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Pa. seeks financial, contract info from Agora Cyber Charter

Updated:May 24, 2016 — 6:39 PM EDT

by Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER martha.woodall@phillynews.com @marwooda

The state Department of Education has expanded the scope of information that the Agora Cyber Charter School must provide by a deadline Friday.

A May 20 letter obtained by the Inquirer shows the department has directed the virtual charter based in King of Prussia to turn over detailed information about its finances, contracts and consultants.

Spokeswomen for the department and Agora confirmed the letter Tuesday.

The communication follows a May 16 letter in which the department told the charter with 8,500 students to submit accurate data on testing and attendance by the deadline or the department “will take appropriate actions against the school.”

The letters express the department’s growing impatience with Agora. Officials have been pressing the cyber for information about its operations since it laid off scores of employees in February without informing the state.

David W. Volkman, the department’s executive deputy secretary, wrote both letters.

He has told Agora that its problems providing requested information appear to be “another symptom of Agora’s ongoing operational issues.”

Since last August, Agora has been led by four leaders and experienced turnover on its board.

Last week, the current three-member board voted to retain Jon Marsh, the former CEO of 21st Century Cyber in Downingtown, to manage the school’s day-to-day operations and be an advisor.

In Volkman’s most recent letter, he asked Agora for monthly financial reports for this fiscal year; copies of contracts negotiated after Jan. 1 and copies of contracts with all independent consultants hired since Jan. 1, including Marsh.

JoAnn Gigliotti, an Agora spokeswoman, said in an e-mail Tuesday that the cyber was working to deliver the data and financial records the department requested.

The cyber has been seeking a five-year renewal of its operating agreement from the Education Department since October 2014. The department oversees Agora and the other 12 cyber charters, which provide online instruction to students in their homes.

“The department is continuing its comprehensive review of Agora Cyber Charter School as required to evaluate the school’s charter renewal,” a department spokeswoman said.

Agora is the second-largest cyber in the state. Its proposed budget for the current fiscal year of $110.2 million was based on an enrollment of 9,140 students, which it did not reach. The revenue comes primarily from taxpayer-funded tuition paid by students’ home districts.

Volkman has said that Agora’s problems recording student attendance raise concerns about whether the cyber is submitting accurate invoices to school districts and is billing for students who are no longer enrolled.

He also said that Agora’s data issues affect its ability to meet state and federal reporting requirements, which could jeopardize federal funding.

Many current and former Agora parents and staffers say some of Agora’s recent problems stem from the end of its management contract with K12 Inc., the for-profit company in Herndon, Va.

In 2014 the board voted to end K12’s management contract and said that Agora would begin managing itself in 2015-16.

According to some parents and teachers, Agora was not ready for the transition. They said numerous problems developed with the systems and software the cyber purchased to replace the technology that K12 had provided.

Volkman’s most recent letter asks for copies of contracts Agora awarded or renegotiated after Jan. 1 related to the cyber’s transition to self-management.

Pa. seeks more data from Agora Cyber Charter

Updated:May 25, 2016 — 1:08 AM EDT

by Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER martha.woodall@phillynews.com

The state Department of Education has expanded the scope of information that the Agora Cyber Charter School must provide by Friday.

A letter dated last Friday and obtained by the Inquirer shows the department has directed the virtual charter, based in King of Prussia, to turn over detailed information about its finances, contracts, and consultants.

Spokeswomen for the department and Agora confirmed the letter Tuesday.

The communication follows a May 16 letter in which the department told the charter, with 8,500 students, to submit accurate data on testing and attendance by the deadline or the department “will take appropriate actions against the school.”

The letters express the department’s growing impatience with Agora. Officials have been pressing the cyber for information about its operations since it laid off scores of employees in February without informing the state.

David W. Volkman, the department’s executive deputy secretary, wrote both letters.

He has told Agora that its problems providing requested information appear to be “another symptom of Agora’s ongoing operational issues.”

Since last August, Agora has been led by four leaders and experienced turnover on its board.

Last week, the current three-member board voted to retain Jon Marsh, the former CEO of 21st Century Cyber in Downingtown, to manage the school’s day-to-day operations and be an adviser.

In Volkman’s most recent letter, he asked Agora for monthly financial reports for this fiscal year, copies of contracts negotiated after Jan. 1, and copies of contracts with all independent consultants hired since Jan. 1, including Marsh.

JoAnn Gigliotti, an Agora spokeswoman, said in an email Tuesday that the school was working to deliver the data and financial records the department requested.

The school has been seeking a five-year renewal of its operating agreement from the Education Department since October 2014. The department oversees Agora and the 12 other cyber charters, which provide online instruction to students in their homes.

“The department is continuing its comprehensive review of Agora Cyber Charter School as required to evaluate the school’s charter renewal,” a department spokeswoman said.

Agora is the second-largest cyber charter in the state. Its proposed budget for the current fiscal year of $110.2 million was based on enrollment of 9,140 students, which it did not reach. The revenue comes primarily from taxpayer-funded tuition paid by students’ home districts.

Volkman has said that Agora’s problems recording student attendance raise concerns about whether the cyber is submitting accurate invoices to school districts and is billing for students who are no longer enrolled.

He also said that Agora’s data issues affect its ability to meet state and federal reporting requirements, which could jeopardize federal funding.

Many current and former Agora parents and staffers say some of Agora’s recent problems stem from the end of its management contract with K12 Inc., a for-profit company in Herndon, Va.

In 2014, the board voted to end K12’s management contract and said Agora would begin managing itself in 2015-16.

According to some parents and teachers, Agora was not ready for the transition. They said numerous problems developed with the systems and software the school purchased to replace the technology that K12 had provided.

Volkman’s most recent letter asks for copies of contracts Agora awarded or renegotiated after Jan. 1 related to the transition to self-management.

Call for Proposals: The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning to Reward Education Innovators

10:30 ET
from The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning

HERNDON, Va., May 17, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning is now accepting applications for grant proposals to recognize and reward innovative educators in blended and online learning environments.

The Foundation’s Teacher Grant Program is looking for teachers and counselors demonstrating excellence with their use of digital tools and out-of-the-box teaching strategies, including but not limited to video, social media, games and other highly-engaging and effective learning strategies.

One-time grants of up to $10,000 each will be awarded. All grants will be made payable to the school and may be used for technology, software, curriculum, classroom supplies and materials.

Launched in January, the mission of The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning is to empower students through personalized learning by advancing the availability and quality of blended and online learning opportunities and outcomes.

Eligibility

Applicants for the Teacher Grant Program must:

  • Be a teacher or guidance counselor, grades K-12, employed by an accredited, state-approved blended or online learning program in the United States.
  • Propose an innovative project that relates specifically to one or more of the following areas:
    • Special Education Support using technology as a catalyst for individual growth
    • English Language Acquisition/English Language Learning (ELA/ELL)
    • Remedial Math
    • Literacy/Reading Interventions

Applications can be submitted at: https://www.scholarsapply.org/fbol-teachergrant/

The deadline for applications is June 15, 2016.

About The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning

The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning is an independent charitable education organization. The mission of the foundation is to empower students through personalized learning by advancing the availability and quality of blended and online learning opportunities and outcomes. To become involved with The Foundation or to learn more, visit www.blendedandonlinelearning.org 

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SOURCE The Foundation for Blended and Online Learning

Related Links

http://www.blendedandonlinelearning.org